Colour

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Colour

  1. 1. IMD09117 and IMD09118 Web Design and Development Unit 8 Colour
  2. 2. Names of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Names of colours enter the language slowly We can differentiate millions of shades Names for about thirty colours Colours tend to be acquired in a sequence
  3. 3. Names of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University All languages have black and white
  4. 4. Names of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University All languages have black and white Next colour acquired is red
  5. 5. Names of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University All languages have black and white Next colour acquired is red The next two are green and yellow
  6. 6. Names of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University All languages have black and white Next colour acquired is red The next two are green and yellow The next is blue
  7. 7. Names of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University All languages have black and white Next colour acquired is red The next two are green and yellow The next is blue The next is brown
  8. 8. Names of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University All languages have black and white Next colour acquired is red The next two are green and yellow The next is blue The next is brown The next four are purple, pink,orange and grey
  9. 9. Names of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University There are cultural differences An African tribe has 6 reds and no green Highland Scots have one word for green and blue Italian 3 blue, French 2 brown Inuit 7 white no brown New Guinea tribe only black and white
  10. 10. Characteristics of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Primary colours - red, yellow and blue Secondary colours - green, orange and violet Tertiary colours - primary and adjacent secondary 12 colours making a colour wheel
  11. 11. Characteristics of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University
  12. 12. Characteristics of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Complementary or contrasting colours - opposite on the colour wheel Compete - active and energetic Hard to look at for long periods of time Can create balance Can be used to highlight areas of screen
  13. 13. Characteristics of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University
  14. 14. Characteristics of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Use of contrasting colours is popular in websites http://www.costaricanrentals.com/
  15. 15. Characteristics of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Harmonious or analogous colours lie near each other on colour wheel Pleasing and tranquil Adding more colours nearby can add more complexity http://www.lukew.com/kdtu/ http://www.metisassoc.com/main/index.htm http://newark1.com/castlepoint1/
  16. 16. Characteristics of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Monotones use a single neutral colour such as grey or beige in varying tints and shades. Tints add white, shades add black http://www.thewhitecompany.com/
  17. 17. Characteristics of colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Monochromatic schemes use one colour Hard to create interest http://www.linkdup.com/ http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/mind/ http://www.worqx.com/color/palette.htm http://www.colorschemer.com/
  18. 18. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Retina made up of rods and cones Rods are light sensitive Cones (blue, green, red) see colour Colour difference green and red then between yellow and blue then all three for luminescence
  19. 19. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University
  20. 20. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Looks at colours in relation to their background
  21. 21. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University
  22. 22. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University http://members.lycos.nl/amazingart/E/32.html
  23. 23. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University
  24. 24. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University The eye detects edges- boundaries between light and dark Dark characters light background good Colour blindness 8% of men and 1% of women So don’t make colour sole source of info
  25. 25. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Can you read this text easily? Can you read this text easily? Can you read this text easily? Can you read this text easily?
  26. 26. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University
  27. 27. Perceiving colour Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University
  28. 28. Colour meanings Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Red Orange Yellow Green Blue
  29. 29. Colour meanings Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Violet Black White Neutral http://www.mariaclaudiacortes.com/colors/Colors.html
  30. 30. Colour meanings Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University calming – activating masculine – feminine simple – luxurious cosy – technical functional – romantic
  31. 31. Colour meanings Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University static – dynamic spartan – extravagant formal – playful cool – warm carefree - sincere
  32. 32. Colour temperatures Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Cool colours: blue, green and violet Blue the coolest Recede and contemplative Good for background
  33. 33. Colour temperatures Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Warm colours: red, orange and yellow Orange the warmest Active, dynamic and tend to advance Preferred by children http://www.boxingforfitness.com.au/ http://www.poplabs.com/ http://www.eeleen.com/
  34. 34. Colour temperatures Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Violet and green can appear warm or cool depending on what they are next to Most interfaces are cool-coloured Warm colours can cause congestion Warm colours for navigation systems
  35. 35. Colour associations Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Market research on washing powder Colour meanings Hotel chain Different cultures http://joehallock.com/edu/COM498/associations.html
  36. 36. Colour associations Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University The Mexican Cage, Mona Hatoum, 2002. The friendly colours of the cage work in contrast with the unfriendly nature of the cage.
  37. 37. Colour in the interface Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Think about contrasting or harmonious Pick dominant colour Limited colour palette adds sophistication and organisation Use accents and colour themes
  38. 38. Colour in the interface Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Depth cueing and layering http://webexhibits.org/colorart/contrast.html
  39. 39. Colour in the interface Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University
  40. 40. Colour contrasts Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Pure colour contrast Warm-cold contrast
  41. 41. Colour contrasts Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Simultaneous contrast Quantity contrast
  42. 42. Colour contrasts Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Light-dark contrast Complementary contrast
  43. 43. Colour contrasts Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Quality contrast
  44. 44. Colour contrasts Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Enough contrast between text and foreground Avoid overcontrast
  45. 45. Colour contrasts Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Red and blue not good 40% operators suffer eyestrain Colour changes to represent status changes Slower reading from screen colour, font and resolution all effect this
  46. 46. Summary Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Names of colours enter the language slowly in a strict sequence but with cultural differences. The colour wheel contains primary, secondary and tertiary colours. Complementary colours are on the opposite sides whilst harmonious are close together.
  47. 47. Summary Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University Mono colour schemes are based on tints and shades of one colour only. The eye uses rods and cones to perceive colour. Defective cones can cause colour blindness. Colours have emotions and associations that are personal, cultural and deep-rooted. Colours can be warm or cool.
  48. 48. Summary Version A Unit 8 ©2008 Napier University There should be a dominant colour in your interface design. Layering can be used for depth-cueing. Contrast should be enough but not excessive. Colour contrasts can be by: pure colour, warm-cold, simultaneous, quantity, light-dark, complementary or quality

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