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THE SEVENTEENTHAND EARLYEIGHTEENTHCENTURIES
NATIVEAMERICANS INPRE-COLUMBIANNORTH AMERICA
Between 1 millionand 5 million NativeAmericans lived inmodern Canada andthe United States
Tribes wereindependent of eachother and oftencompeted for thesame naturalresources
Difficult tounite againstEuropeans
THE EARLYCOLONIAL ERA:SPAIN COLONIZESTHE NEW WORLD
Columbus returned toSpain and reported theexistence of a rich NewWorld with easy-to-subjugate natives
During the nextcentury, Spainwas the colonialpower
Advancedweaponry andincredibleruthlessness of theconquistadors
Spanish Armadamade it difficult forother countries tosend their ownexpeditions.
conquistadors enslavedthe natives andattempted to erase theirculture and supplant itwith Catholicism
Europeans were"carriers" ofsmall pox
THE ENGLISHARRIVE
The “LostColony”
Sir Walter Raleighsponsored asettlement onRoanoke Island
By 1590 thecolony haddisappeared
In 1607 theysettledJamestown
joint-stock company: agroup of investors whobought the right toestablish New Worldplantations from theking
company wascalled theVirginiaCompany
Englishgentlemen, were ill-suited to the manyadjustments life in theNew World required
Captain JohnSmith imposedharsh martiallaw
"He who willnot work shallnot eat."
During the starvingtime of 1609 and1610, someresorted tocannibalism
PowhatanConfederacy taughtthe English whatcrops to plant andhow to plant them
1614, Pocahontas,the daughter of thechief, marriedplanter John Rolfe
English forgot theirdebt to thePowhatan as soonas they neededmore land
PowhatanConfederacy wasdestroyed byEnglish in 1644.
John Rolfeintroduced thecash crop oftobacco
Indiansshowed himhow
Tobacco’s successlargelydetermined thefate of theVirginia region
Area came to beknown as theChesapeake(named after thebay)
Whyemigrate?
Overpopulation inEngland had led towidespread famine,disease, and poverty
Opportunityprovided byindenturedservitude
Indentured servantsreceived a small piece ofproperty with theirfreedom, thus enablingthem (1) to survive, and (2)to vote
In 1619 Virginiaestablished the Houseof Burgesses, in whichany property-holding, white malecould vote
THE PILGRIMS ANDTHEMASSACHUSETTSBAY COMPANY
Protestantmovement calledPuritanism arose inEngland
Wanted to purifythe corruptAnglican Church
One Puritan groupcalled Separatists leftEngland and went toHolland
In 1620 they set sail for VirginiaMayflower, went offcourse and theylanded in modern-dayMassachusetts
Mayflower Compactcreated a legal authority and anassembly. It asserted that thegovernments power derivesfrom the consent o...
Pilgrims receivedlife-savingassistance fromlocal NativeAmericans
1629: a larger and morepowerful colony calledMassachusetts Bay wasestablished byCongregationalists (Puritanswho wanted to ...
Separatists and theCongregationalists did nottolerate religious freedomin their colonies, eventhough both hadexperienced a...
Roger Williams, a teacher in theSalem Bay settlement, taught thatchurch and state should beseparatePuritans banished Willi...
He moved tomodern-day RhodeIsland and foundeda new colony
Anne Hutchinson wasa prominentproponent ofantinomianism
antinomianismfaith and Gods gracesuffice to earn one aplace among the"elect."
She was tried forheresy, convicted,and banished
The death ofCromwell(1658)
English settlers inNew England andthe Chesapeakedifferedconsiderably
New Englanderswere definitelymore religious
OTHER EARLYCOLONIES
ConnecticutValley, a fertileregion with lots ofaccess to the sea
Pequots attacked asettlement inWakefield and killednine colonists
Massachusetts BayColony retaliated byburning the main Pequotvillage, killing 400, manyof them women andchildren
This was the“PequotWar”
Proprietorships: ownedby one person, whousually received the landas a gift from the kingConnecticut was one suchcolony
Maryland wasanother, granted toCecilius Calvert,Lord Baltimore
Maryland became ahaven of religioustolerance for allChristians, and it becamethe first major Catholicenclave in the New Wo...
New York was also a royal giftSome of the area wasa Dutch settlementcalled NewNetherland
The Quakers received theirown colony. William Penn,a Quaker, was a closefriend of King Charles II,and Charles granted Penn...
Carolina was also aproprietary colony,which ultimatelysplit in two
North Carolina, whichwas settled byVirginians, developedinto a Virginia-likecolony
South Carolina wassettled by thedescendants ofEnglishmen who hadcolonized Barbados
Their arrival trulymarked thebeginning of theslave era in thecolonies.
Triangular traderoutesSlaves to sugar plantations,sugar to distillers in colonies,rum and such to Europe
Eventually, most of theproprietary colonieswere converted to royalcolonies (owned by thecrown)
THE AGE OFSALUTARY NEGLECT(1650 TO 1750)Also “Benign Neglect”
British too busywith otherproblems to keepclose rein oncolonies
ENGLISH REGULATIONOF COLONIAL TRADEMercantilists believed thateconomic power was rooted in afavorable balance of trade.Ame...
Navigation Acts requiredthe colonists to buy goodsonly from England andprohibited the coloniesfrom manufacturing anumber o...
MAJOR EVENTSOF THE PERIODConsult your “laundry list”
LIFE IN THE COLONIESPopulation in 1700was 250,000; by 1750,that number was1,250,000
Over 90 percent-livedin rural areasChildren and women werecompletely subordinate tomen! (Great Idea!!)
Childrens educationhad to be fit inaround their workschedules
Married womenwere not allowed tovote, own property,draft a will, ortestify in court.
Slaves often developedextended-kinship ties andstrong communal bonds tocope with the misery ofservitude and the possibilit...
New Englandsociety centered ontrade. Boston wasthe colonies majorport city
The middle colonies-New York,Pennsylvania, NewJersey-had more fertileland and so focusedprimarily on farming
The lower South(the Carolinas)concentrated onsuch cash crops astobacco and rice
Majority ofSoutherners weresubsistence farmerswho had no slaves
Colonies on theChesapeakecombined features ofthe middle coloniesand the lower South
Colonies were hardlya unified whole asthey approached theevents that led themto rebel
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Transcript of "1 early colonies-1"

  1. 1. THE SEVENTEENTHAND EARLYEIGHTEENTHCENTURIES
  2. 2. NATIVEAMERICANS INPRE-COLUMBIANNORTH AMERICA
  3. 3. Between 1 millionand 5 million NativeAmericans lived inmodern Canada andthe United States
  4. 4. Tribes wereindependent of eachother and oftencompeted for thesame naturalresources
  5. 5. Difficult tounite againstEuropeans
  6. 6. THE EARLYCOLONIAL ERA:SPAIN COLONIZESTHE NEW WORLD
  7. 7. Columbus returned toSpain and reported theexistence of a rich NewWorld with easy-to-subjugate natives
  8. 8. During the nextcentury, Spainwas the colonialpower
  9. 9. Advancedweaponry andincredibleruthlessness of theconquistadors
  10. 10. Spanish Armadamade it difficult forother countries tosend their ownexpeditions.
  11. 11. conquistadors enslavedthe natives andattempted to erase theirculture and supplant itwith Catholicism
  12. 12. Europeans were"carriers" ofsmall pox
  13. 13. THE ENGLISHARRIVE
  14. 14. The “LostColony”
  15. 15. Sir Walter Raleighsponsored asettlement onRoanoke Island
  16. 16. By 1590 thecolony haddisappeared
  17. 17. In 1607 theysettledJamestown
  18. 18. joint-stock company: agroup of investors whobought the right toestablish New Worldplantations from theking
  19. 19. company wascalled theVirginiaCompany
  20. 20. Englishgentlemen, were ill-suited to the manyadjustments life in theNew World required
  21. 21. Captain JohnSmith imposedharsh martiallaw
  22. 22. "He who willnot work shallnot eat."
  23. 23. During the starvingtime of 1609 and1610, someresorted tocannibalism
  24. 24. PowhatanConfederacy taughtthe English whatcrops to plant andhow to plant them
  25. 25. 1614, Pocahontas,the daughter of thechief, marriedplanter John Rolfe
  26. 26. English forgot theirdebt to thePowhatan as soonas they neededmore land
  27. 27. PowhatanConfederacy wasdestroyed byEnglish in 1644.
  28. 28. John Rolfeintroduced thecash crop oftobacco
  29. 29. Indiansshowed himhow
  30. 30. Tobacco’s successlargelydetermined thefate of theVirginia region
  31. 31. Area came to beknown as theChesapeake(named after thebay)
  32. 32. Whyemigrate?
  33. 33. Overpopulation inEngland had led towidespread famine,disease, and poverty
  34. 34. Opportunityprovided byindenturedservitude
  35. 35. Indentured servantsreceived a small piece ofproperty with theirfreedom, thus enablingthem (1) to survive, and (2)to vote
  36. 36. In 1619 Virginiaestablished the Houseof Burgesses, in whichany property-holding, white malecould vote
  37. 37. THE PILGRIMS ANDTHEMASSACHUSETTSBAY COMPANY
  38. 38. Protestantmovement calledPuritanism arose inEngland
  39. 39. Wanted to purifythe corruptAnglican Church
  40. 40. One Puritan groupcalled Separatists leftEngland and went toHolland
  41. 41. In 1620 they set sail for VirginiaMayflower, went offcourse and theylanded in modern-dayMassachusetts
  42. 42. Mayflower Compactcreated a legal authority and anassembly. It asserted that thegovernments power derivesfrom the consent of thegoverned
  43. 43. Pilgrims receivedlife-savingassistance fromlocal NativeAmericans
  44. 44. 1629: a larger and morepowerful colony calledMassachusetts Bay wasestablished byCongregationalists (Puritanswho wanted to reform theAnglican church from within )
  45. 45. Separatists and theCongregationalists did nottolerate religious freedomin their colonies, eventhough both hadexperienced and fledreligious persecution.
  46. 46. Roger Williams, a teacher in theSalem Bay settlement, taught thatchurch and state should beseparatePuritans banished Williams
  47. 47. He moved tomodern-day RhodeIsland and foundeda new colony
  48. 48. Anne Hutchinson wasa prominentproponent ofantinomianism
  49. 49. antinomianismfaith and Gods gracesuffice to earn one aplace among the"elect."
  50. 50. She was tried forheresy, convicted,and banished
  51. 51. The death ofCromwell(1658)
  52. 52. English settlers inNew England andthe Chesapeakedifferedconsiderably
  53. 53. New Englanderswere definitelymore religious
  54. 54. OTHER EARLYCOLONIES
  55. 55. ConnecticutValley, a fertileregion with lots ofaccess to the sea
  56. 56. Pequots attacked asettlement inWakefield and killednine colonists
  57. 57. Massachusetts BayColony retaliated byburning the main Pequotvillage, killing 400, manyof them women andchildren
  58. 58. This was the“PequotWar”
  59. 59. Proprietorships: ownedby one person, whousually received the landas a gift from the kingConnecticut was one suchcolony
  60. 60. Maryland wasanother, granted toCecilius Calvert,Lord Baltimore
  61. 61. Maryland became ahaven of religioustolerance for allChristians, and it becamethe first major Catholicenclave in the New World
  62. 62. New York was also a royal giftSome of the area wasa Dutch settlementcalled NewNetherland
  63. 63. The Quakers received theirown colony. William Penn,a Quaker, was a closefriend of King Charles II,and Charles granted Pennwhat became Pennsylvania
  64. 64. Carolina was also aproprietary colony,which ultimatelysplit in two
  65. 65. North Carolina, whichwas settled byVirginians, developedinto a Virginia-likecolony
  66. 66. South Carolina wassettled by thedescendants ofEnglishmen who hadcolonized Barbados
  67. 67. Their arrival trulymarked thebeginning of theslave era in thecolonies.
  68. 68. Triangular traderoutesSlaves to sugar plantations,sugar to distillers in colonies,rum and such to Europe
  69. 69. Eventually, most of theproprietary colonieswere converted to royalcolonies (owned by thecrown)
  70. 70. THE AGE OFSALUTARY NEGLECT(1650 TO 1750)Also “Benign Neglect”
  71. 71. British too busywith otherproblems to keepclose rein oncolonies
  72. 72. ENGLISH REGULATIONOF COLONIAL TRADEMercantilists believed thateconomic power was rooted in afavorable balance of trade.American colonies were seenprimarily as markets for British andWest Indian goods.
  73. 73. Navigation Acts requiredthe colonists to buy goodsonly from England andprohibited the coloniesfrom manufacturing anumber of goods thatEngland already produced
  74. 74. MAJOR EVENTSOF THE PERIODConsult your “laundry list”
  75. 75. LIFE IN THE COLONIESPopulation in 1700was 250,000; by 1750,that number was1,250,000
  76. 76. Over 90 percent-livedin rural areasChildren and women werecompletely subordinate tomen! (Great Idea!!)
  77. 77. Childrens educationhad to be fit inaround their workschedules
  78. 78. Married womenwere not allowed tovote, own property,draft a will, ortestify in court.
  79. 79. Slaves often developedextended-kinship ties andstrong communal bonds tocope with the misery ofservitude and the possibilitythat their nuclear familiesmight be separated by sale
  80. 80. New Englandsociety centered ontrade. Boston wasthe colonies majorport city
  81. 81. The middle colonies-New York,Pennsylvania, NewJersey-had more fertileland and so focusedprimarily on farming
  82. 82. The lower South(the Carolinas)concentrated onsuch cash crops astobacco and rice
  83. 83. Majority ofSoutherners weresubsistence farmerswho had no slaves
  84. 84. Colonies on theChesapeakecombined features ofthe middle coloniesand the lower South
  85. 85. Colonies were hardlya unified whole asthey approached theevents that led themto rebel
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