Measuring Success  Phase One of a Longitudinal Study that Measures the Impact of a Statewide Program in Oregon to Reduce t...
Sharon Warner Methvin, PhD Department of Sociology  Clark College Vancouver, Washington 98663 [email_address]   360.992.29...
Do Trap Neuter Return Programs for Oregon’s Feral Cats Make a Difference?  How Do We Measure Success?
Measuring Success <ul><li>Which Cats?  </li></ul><ul><li>Which Places?  </li></ul><ul><li>Which Circumstances?  </li></ul>...
Areas of Measurement of Program Success in this Study <ul><li>The cat </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term health and well-being of...
Research Design <ul><li>Stratified by location of urban and rural </li></ul><ul><li>Systematic ten percent sample </li></u...
Sample Strategy <ul><li>Ten percent sample of six clinics over a six month period </li></ul><ul><li>Sample consists of 48 ...
The Question Asked? <ul><li>Is the Feral Cat Coalition of Oregon making a difference in reducing overpopulation?  </li></ul>
FCCO Program <ul><li>Founded in 1995 </li></ul><ul><li>A Trap, Neuter, Return (TNR) Program </li></ul><ul><li>3-4 Saturday...
Cat Archetypes <ul><li>Commercial Kitty </li></ul><ul><li>Lone Mom/Tom Hobo </li></ul><ul><li>Barnyard Kitty </li></ul><ul...
Commercial Kitty Archetype  Mama
Commercial Kitty 7 cases  <ul><li>A four generation lineage, meaning an offspring of a commercial kitty who often has had ...
Mom/Tom Hobo Tuxedo Kitty
Mom/Tom Neighborhood Hobo 14 cases <ul><li>Usually an abandoned stray that over time may become more scared and wild </li>...
Barnyard Kitten Chocolate Chip
Barnyard Kitten 4 cases <ul><li>Born into the farm colony </li></ul><ul><li>Usually and offspring of a mamma cat that was ...
Residential Cluster Mr. Monroe
Residential Cluster 16 cases <ul><li>May be in the shed, garage, green space </li></ul><ul><li>Single family houses, apart...
Colony Archetypes <ul><li>Virgin Colony </li></ul><ul><li>First time Trapped  </li></ul><ul><li>Colony Undergoing Stabiliz...
Virgin Colonies 13 cases <ul><li>9 at stabilization; 4 at maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>Most brought in my caregivers not ...
Colonies at Stabilization 10 cases (non virgin) <ul><li>Reached on average 50% sterilization rate </li></ul><ul><li>Usuall...
Colonies at Maintenance 21 cases  <ul><li>11 colonies at 100% sterilization </li></ul><ul><li>Others have one or two cats ...
Strategies to Improve Success <ul><li>Colony follow up plan to achieve 80% rule </li></ul><ul><li>Establish voucher progra...
Discussion <ul><li>Clearly for the cats, such as Mr. Monroe, Tuxedo Kitty, Mama, and Chocolate and 19, 996 others, the org...
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Feral Cat Trap, Neuter Release Programs: Measuring Success of Community Feral Cat TNR Programs

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  • Commercial Kitty-Mama Hobo
  • Mom/Tom Hobo-Tuxedo Kitty
  • Barnyard Kitten-Chocolate Chip
  • Residential Cluster- Mr. Monroe
  • Feral Cat Trap, Neuter Release Programs: Measuring Success of Community Feral Cat TNR Programs

    1. 1. Measuring Success Phase One of a Longitudinal Study that Measures the Impact of a Statewide Program in Oregon to Reduce the Population of Feral Cats
    2. 2. Sharon Warner Methvin, PhD Department of Sociology Clark College Vancouver, Washington 98663 [email_address] 360.992.2976
    3. 3. Do Trap Neuter Return Programs for Oregon’s Feral Cats Make a Difference? How Do We Measure Success?
    4. 4. Measuring Success <ul><li>Which Cats? </li></ul><ul><li>Which Places? </li></ul><ul><li>Which Circumstances? </li></ul><ul><li>Which Caregivers? </li></ul>
    5. 5. Areas of Measurement of Program Success in this Study <ul><li>The cat </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term health and well-being of the animal </li></ul><ul><li>The colony </li></ul><ul><li>Stabilization of the increase of the feral population within the colony </li></ul><ul><li>The caretaker </li></ul><ul><li>Stability in caregiver responsibility for the feral colony </li></ul>
    6. 6. Research Design <ul><li>Stratified by location of urban and rural </li></ul><ul><li>Systematic ten percent sample </li></ul><ul><li>Randomized by all cats participating in the clinic each had an equal chance of entering study </li></ul><ul><li>Six clinics selected during a six month period </li></ul><ul><li>Follow up interviews at six months and one and a half years out (ongoing at this time) </li></ul><ul><li>A 55 point questionnaire and interview entered into access, coupled with two phone interviews that repeat key data points </li></ul>
    7. 7. Sample Strategy <ul><li>Ten percent sample of six clinics over a six month period </li></ul><ul><li>Sample consists of 48 cases that are representative of approximately 1500 cats served by the program </li></ul><ul><li>Clinics represent two urban service areas and a composite picture of the rural service area </li></ul>
    8. 8. The Question Asked? <ul><li>Is the Feral Cat Coalition of Oregon making a difference in reducing overpopulation? </li></ul>
    9. 9. FCCO Program <ul><li>Founded in 1995 </li></ul><ul><li>A Trap, Neuter, Return (TNR) Program </li></ul><ul><li>3-4 Saturday Clinics each Month </li></ul><ul><li>An average of 80 Cats per Clinic </li></ul><ul><li>20,000 Cats Sterilized to Date </li></ul><ul><li>www.feralcats.com </li></ul>
    10. 10. Cat Archetypes <ul><li>Commercial Kitty </li></ul><ul><li>Lone Mom/Tom Hobo </li></ul><ul><li>Barnyard Kitty </li></ul><ul><li>Residential Cluster </li></ul>
    11. 11. Commercial Kitty Archetype Mama
    12. 12. Commercial Kitty 7 cases <ul><li>A four generation lineage, meaning an offspring of a commercial kitty who often has had at least two of her own litters. </li></ul><ul><li>Workers tend to feed and create innovative shelters. </li></ul><ul><li>Adult cats are quite feral but well adapted to environment; kittens may be caught and adopted. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Mom/Tom Hobo Tuxedo Kitty
    14. 14. Mom/Tom Neighborhood Hobo 14 cases <ul><li>Usually an abandoned stray that over time may become more scared and wild </li></ul><ul><li>Usually wonders the neighborhood searching for a safe place to live, often with offspring from one or more litters </li></ul><ul><li>May search and/or compete with other animals for food and/or territory </li></ul><ul><li>May find/trust a new caregiver and settle into the new yard or even home </li></ul>
    15. 15. Barnyard Kitten Chocolate Chip
    16. 16. Barnyard Kitten 4 cases <ul><li>Born into the farm colony </li></ul><ul><li>Usually and offspring of a mamma cat that was dumped and showed up one day or was herself born into the colony </li></ul><ul><li>Those who survive beyond kitten hood tend to be healthy and well adapted to the environment </li></ul><ul><li>Some baby barn kittens are tamed by the caregivers and adopted out </li></ul><ul><li>Adult barn cats (3 more cases) are a subset </li></ul>
    17. 17. Residential Cluster Mr. Monroe
    18. 18. Residential Cluster 16 cases <ul><li>May be in the shed, garage, green space </li></ul><ul><li>Single family houses, apartment complexes, trailer parks </li></ul><ul><li>Two or more generations of feral or abandoned cats who stay </li></ul><ul><li>Often an extended lineage of collateral and lineal offspring </li></ul>
    19. 19. Colony Archetypes <ul><li>Virgin Colony </li></ul><ul><li>First time Trapped </li></ul><ul><li>Colony Undergoing Stabilization </li></ul><ul><li>Reached 50% Rate </li></ul><ul><li>Colony Undergoing Maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>Reached 80% Rate </li></ul>
    20. 20. Virgin Colonies 13 cases <ul><li>9 at stabilization; 4 at maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>Most brought in my caregivers not FCCO volunteer trappers </li></ul><ul><li>On average only 50% of the cats in colony had been caught </li></ul>
    21. 21. Colonies at Stabilization 10 cases (non virgin) <ul><li>Reached on average 50% sterilization rate </li></ul><ul><li>Usually one or more “holdouts” </li></ul><ul><li>May have one or more young litters to catch </li></ul><ul><li>Usually brought in by caregivers instead of FCCO volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>May need to wait two or more months for next clinic </li></ul>
    22. 22. Colonies at Maintenance 21 cases <ul><li>11 colonies at 100% sterilization </li></ul><ul><li>Others have one or two cats unaltered </li></ul><ul><li>All have reached the 80% sterilization </li></ul><ul><li>Half brought in by caregivers & half FCCO </li></ul><ul><li>Trapped over one or more years </li></ul><ul><li>Frequent attendance at clinics (3-8x’s) </li></ul>
    23. 23. Strategies to Improve Success <ul><li>Colony follow up plan to achieve 80% rule </li></ul><ul><li>Establish voucher program and/or Monday clinic to catch “holdout” cats and young </li></ul><ul><li>Establish separate mechanism for sterilizing cats from FCCO volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>Establish tracking plan to monitor colonies </li></ul><ul><li>Establish frequent, targeted clinic locations </li></ul><ul><li>Advance marketing in targeted location </li></ul>
    24. 24. Discussion <ul><li>Clearly for the cats, such as Mr. Monroe, Tuxedo Kitty, Mama, and Chocolate and 19, 996 others, the organization has made a difference </li></ul><ul><li>For the over population of feral and stray cats, the difference is less clear </li></ul><ul><li>Depends on which location and which colonies </li></ul><ul><li>These two factors will be better understood once the comparative data from the follow up interviews are analyzed </li></ul>

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