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Keeping Your Moderating Skills Sharp
 

Keeping Your Moderating Skills Sharp

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    Keeping Your Moderating Skills Sharp Keeping Your Moderating Skills Sharp Presentation Transcript

    • Keeping Your Moderating Skills SharpSusan MercerSenior Experience Researchersmercer@madpow.com@susanamercer
    • The Importance of Neutrality•  Clients want objective answers•  Asking biased questions lead to biased answers•  Participants want to please us •  Providing types of feedback can subtly communicate our expectations •  They are more likely to answer future questions that way2
    • The Reality of Moderation•  Observed 17 practitioners•  Many usability professionals get sloppy: •  Ask leading questions •  Participant: “I would share this article with friends.” •  Moderator: “By printing it?” •  Ask closed-ended questions •  Moderator: “Would you print this?” •  Focus on known problems for “ammunition” •  Use biasing response phrases “Good job”, “Yes, that’s a problem.”3 Source: Norgaard & Hornbaek, 2006
    • What does this mean?•  Current practices are not consistent•  Moderating is taught through mentorship •  bad habits can easily be perpetuated•  We need to pay attention to our moderation and remain neutral to capture unbiased data. 4
    • 5 Rules of Great Moderating
(A Quick Review)
    • 5 Rules of Great Moderating1.  Know your goals2.  Stay neutral 3.  Be responsible4.  Be confident5.  Be genuine6
    • 1. Know Your Goals•  What are you trying to achieve? •  Formative •  Summative •  What topics are highest priority?These will influence •  What to focus on when time runs short •  How you fine-tune your moderating style7
    • 5 Rules of Great Moderating1.  Know your goals2.  Stay neutral 3.  Be responsible4.  Be confident5.  Be genuine8
    • 2. Stay Neutral•  Be Quiet!•  Don’t insinuate they gave a wrong answer ✘ “Why did you do that?” ✘ “What made you think to click that link?”•  Don’t put ideas into their heads ✘ “Does entering your SSN make you feel uncomfortable?”  “What do you think about entering your SSN?”•  Use their words •  If they call the dashboard a “chart area”, then call it a “chart area”•  Keep your tone naturally curious, not derisive •  “What did you expect here?”9
    • 2. Stay Neutral•  Don’t start with a verb ✘  id you see that? D ✘  as that difficult? W ✘ s this frustrating? I•  Start with What, When, Where, Why, How   hat would you change to make this easier? W   hen in this process would you be ready to buy? W   here did you expect to find that information? W   hy did you say this was easy? W   ow does that error message make you feel? H10
    • 2. Stay Neutral•  Use neutral, “continuing” response phrases•  Acknowledge that they gave feedback•  Don’t imply whether it is good or bad ✘ “Oh”, “Hmm”, “Interesting” - Assessing ✘ “OK”, “Yeah”, “That’s good” - Agreeing   Uh huh”, “Mhmm”, “Tell me more” – Continuing “•  Other tips to staying neutral?11 Source: Boren & Ramey, 2000
    • 5 Rules of Great Moderating1.  Know your goals2.  Stay neutral 3.  Be responsible4.  Be confident5.  Be genuine12
    • 3. Be ResponsibleYou have responsibilities to:•  Participant•  Company•  Future Users •  Study Integrity13
    • 3. Be ResponsibleSituations happen during testing.You may need to juggle your responsibilities.What are your priorities?•  Study Integrity•  Company•  Future Users•  Participant14
    • What to do?If…•  Participant overshares personal information•  The participant rants about the website and calls it “crap”15
    • 5 Rules of Great Moderating1.  Know your goals2.  Stay neutral 3.  Be responsible4.  Be confident5.  Be genuine16
    • 4. Be Confident•  Project confidence•  If you make a mistake, keep going•  Don’t over-apologize•  Pause if you need to collect your thoughts•  “Fake it until you make it”17
    • 5 Rules of Great Moderating1.  Know your goals2.  Stay neutral 3.  Be responsible4.  Be confident5.  Be genuine18
    • 5. Be Genuine•  Don’t play the notes on the page……play the music•  Don’t just read the questions from the page……have a conversation19
    • 5 Rules of Great Moderating1.  Know your goals2.  Stay neutral 3.  Be responsible4.  Be confident5.  Be genuine6. What else?20
    • Keeping sharp
    • Keep Improving1.  Identify your improvement areas •  Watch your videos •  Have colleagues give you feedback22
    • Keep Improving2.  Learn from others •  Watch others moderate •  Be a participant •  Listen to talk radio interviews23
    • Keep Improving3.  Practice skills in everyday life •  People watch (observe) in public •  Be quiet and listen in everyday conversations24
    • Your Thoughts?25
    • Thank You! (Full presentation is on Slideshare. Follow me on twitter for link) Susan Mercer Senior Experience Researcher smercer@madpow.com @susanamercer26
    • References / Photo CreditsBoren, T. and Ramey, J. (2000) Thinking aloud: reconciling theory and practice. IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, 43 (3), 261-278.Dumas, J. and Loring, B. (2008) Moderating usability tests, Morgan Kaufman.Dumas, J. and Redish, J. (1999) A practical guide to usability testing, Intellect Ltd.Ericsson, K. and Simon, H. (1980) Verbal reports as data. Psychological review. 87 (3), 215-251.Krahmer, E. and Ummelen, N. (2004) Thinking about thinking aloud: A comparison of two verbal protocols for usability testing. IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, 47 (2), 105-117.Norgaard, M. and Hornbaek, K. (2006) What do usability evaluators do in practice? An exploratory study of think-aloud testing. DIS 2006, 209-218.Slide 4: Samantha Louras Photography Slide 5: flickr: torgeauxSlide 14: flickr: mkorcusa, flickr: Calsidyrose, flickr: marioanima, flickr: breity, flickr: Qole PejorianSlides 27, 29 and 30: flickr: Raphael Quinet, flickr: acme, flickr: betsyweber, flickr: KirkOlsSlide 32: flickr: bberburbSlide 34: flickr: Tulane Public RelationsSlide 35: flickr: apdk, flickr: marktristanSlide 38: flickr: Raphael QuinetSlide 39: flickr: l-i-n-kSlide 40: flickr: loppear27