Velocity acceleration

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  • Answer: C
  • IG2.1
  • Velocity acceleration

    1. 1. Kinematics in One DimensionIn this chapter we studykinematics of motion in onedimension—motion along astraight line. Runners, dragracers, and skiers are just afew examples of motion inone dimension.Chapter Goal: To learnhow to solve problems aboutmotion in a straight line.Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    2. 2. Kinematics in One Dimension Topics: • Uniform Motion • Instantaneous Velocity • Finding Position from Velocity • Motion with Constant Acceleration • Free Fall • Motion on an Inclined Plane • Instantaneous AccelerationCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    3. 3. Reading QuizzesCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    4. 4. The slope at a point on a position- versus-time graph of an object is A. the object’s speed at that point. B. the object’s average velocity at that point. C. the object’s instantaneous velocity at that point. D. the object’s acceleration at that point. E. the distance traveled by the object to that point.Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    5. 5. The slope at a point on a position- versus-time graph of an object is A. the object’s speed at that point. B. the object’s average velocity at that point. C. the object’s instantaneous velocity at that point. D. the object’s acceleration at that point. E. the distance traveled by the object to that point.Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    6. 6. Basic Content and ExamplesCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    7. 7. Uniform MotionStraight-line motion in which equal displacements occurduring any successive equal-time intervals is called uniformmotion. For one-dimensional motion, average velocity isgiven byCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    8. 8. Skating with constant velocityCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    9. 9. Skating with constant velocityCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    10. 10. Skating with constant velocityCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    11. 11. Skating with constant velocityCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    12. 12. Skating with constant velocityCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    13. 13. Tactics: Interpreting position-versus-time graphsCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    14. 14. Tactics: Interpreting position-versus-time graphsCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    15. 15. Instantaneous VelocityAverage velocity becomes a better and betterapproximation to the instantaneous velocity as the timeinterval over which the average is taken gets smaller andsmaller.As Δt continues to get smaller, the average velocity vavg =Δs/Δt reaches a constant or limiting value. That is, theinstantaneous velocity at time t is the average velocityduring a time interval Δt centered on t, as Δt approacheszero.Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    16. 16. Finding velocity from position graphicallyQUESTION:Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    17. 17. Finding velocity from position graphicallyCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    18. 18. Finding velocity from position graphicallyCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    19. 19. Finding velocity from position graphicallyCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    20. 20. Finding velocity from position graphicallyCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    21. 21. Finding velocity from position graphicallyCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    22. 22. Tactics: Interpreting graphical representations of motionCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    23. 23. Instantaneous AccelerationThe instantaneous acceleration as at a specific instant oftime t is given by the derivative of the velocityCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    24. 24. Finding velocity from accelerationQUESTION:Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    25. 25. Finding velocity from accelerationCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    26. 26. Summary SlidesCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    27. 27. Important ConceptsCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    28. 28. Important ConceptsCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.
    29. 29. ApplicationsCopyright © 2008 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley.

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