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Lccc curriculum design handouts- 1-17-1045

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  • In Florida the median earnings is 27% greater for certificate holders than those who left without any credential. ($8,000 per year more)Overall median earnings was higher for those who gained certificates than for those who completed an AA degree and went immediately into the workforce.The longer the certificate the higher the earnings.
  • Materials includedCourse ContentLearning ObjectsDiscussion Questions
  • California Community College System -25% of FTIC students achieve this goal.ExampleIf your school increased the percentage from 25% to 30
  • 19% took classes in summerIf raised to 25%10% increase in your graduation rate or 2 graduates per 100 FTIC
  • California Community College System- Take Math = 29%54% attempt no math two years29% enrolled in math but only at the remedial level 17% enrolled in a college level math but dropped or failed.-Take College English = 36%Math if increased to 34% (from 29%)6% increase in graduation or 2 additional graduates per 100 FTICEnglish if increased to 41% (from 36%)5% increase in graduation or 1.5 additional graduates per 100 FTICIn Florida, students with accelerated credit are 14% more likely to earn a C or higher in ENC 1101 and 23% more likely to earn a C or higher in MAC 1105

Transcript

  • 1. Jim SimpsonFlorida State College at Jacksonville
  • 2. Keys to How Program Design Can Increase Graduation Rates  Maximize Program Design  Program Length  Certificate Programs  Electives  Synergize Programs  Strengthen On-Line Courses  Advising Actions  LCCC Observations  Lesson Learned
  • 3. LCCC Model
  • 4. Stopping ShortSource: Theuen, B. (2010), Most Community College StudentsNever Graduate, The Texas Tribune
  • 5. Our Students Have Changed  75% of students are juggling jobs, commuting to class.  Even when given twice as long, no more than a quarter of part-time students ever graduate with either a certificate or associate degree.  Students are taking too many credits and too much time to complete.Source: Complete College America; (2011); Time is the Enemy; Completionby Design, Washington D.C.
  • 6. Excess Hours = Lower Graduation• Nationally, students receiving an associate degree earned an average of 79 credits for programs that were 60 credit hours in length• Nationally, Students receiving certificate earned on average 63.5 credits even though just 30 credits were required to attain a certificate.Are LCCC students obtaining degree in themost efficient manner and what is the addedmonetary cost to the student and to the statefor attaining a degree with excess hours?Source: Complete College America, 2001, Time is the Enemy, Washington DC
  • 7. Program Structure“College students are more likely to persistand succeed in programs that are highlystructured, with little room for individuals todeviate from a path toward completion.”– Judith Scott-ClaytonSource: Scott-Clayton, J., 2011, The Shapeless River: Does a Lack of StructureInhibit Students’ Progress at Community Colleges?, CCRC Working Paper No. 25:A Working Paper in the CCRC Assessment of Evidence Series
  • 8. Contributing Factors  Community college students may not have appropriate college knowledge.  Many community college students report that they have had limited access to advising.  Scheduling barriers also play a role.Source: Zeidenberg, M.; (2012), Valuable Learning or Spinning Their Wheels?Understanding Excess Credits Earned by Community College Associate Degree Completers:CCRC Working Paper No. 44; Columbia University: Community College Research Center.
  • 9. Program LengthCore questions to ask in designingprogram length: Are you required by statute, licensure, or accreditation to offer a program over 60 credit hours? If the answer is no, ask yourself do the additional hours result in significant value added for the graduate?
  • 10. Impact of Additional Hours at LCCC Median Program Length for Associate Degree = 66 hours  Projected 150% graduation rate for 66 credit hour program  27.9% for Full Time Students  10.2% for Part Time Students  16.4% Graduation Rate  Need to recruit 6 new students every Fall to produce 1 graduate
  • 11. Impact of Additional Hours at LCCC If Program Length for Associate Degree = 60 hours  Projected 150% graduation rate for 60 credit hour program  31.4% for Full Time Students (+13% increase)  12.5% for Part Time Students (+22% increase)  19.1% Total Graduation Rate (+17% increase)  Need to recruit 5 new students every Fall to produce 1 graduate  Reduces time to degree:  From 2.04 years to 1.86 years for full time students  8.8% reduction in time to degree  From 5.2 years to 4.7 years for part time students  9.6% reduction in time to degree
  • 12. Impact of Additional Hours at LCCC For every credit hour over 60, a LCCC program reduces the number of graduates it can produce by 2.6%.
  • 13. The Value of Certificate Programs  People earn certificates throughout their working lives.  Certificate holders tend to come from backgrounds of low to moderate family income.  On average, certificate holders earn roughly the same as workers with some college, but no degree. Source: Carnevale, A., Rose, S., Hanson, A., (2012), Certificates: Gateway to Gainful Employment and College Degrees. Georgetown University; Center on Education and the Workforce.
  • 14. The Value of Certificate ProgramsEarning Benefit In the US, the median earnings is 7% greater for certificate holders than those who leave without any credential. In the US, certificate holders are 16% more likely to be employed full time than those who leave without any credential. In the US, certificate holders are 11% more likely to be employed in a job with benefits than those who leave without any credential. In the US, certificate holders are 36% less likely to be unemployed than those who leave without any credential. Source: Ifill, N, Radford, A, (January 2012), Beginning Subbaccalaureate Students’ Labor Market Experiences: Six Years Latter in 2009, NCES 2012-273, US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics
  • 15. Impact of CertificatePrograms onGraduation Rates A student is 33% morelikely to graduate withan associate degree ifthey graduate from anembedded certificateprogram. Source: Simpson, Jim (2007); Impact of Certificate Graduates on AS/AAS Graduate Rates at FCCJ; Florida Community College at Jacksonville Internal Study
  • 16. Impact of Certificates at FSCJ  College credit certificate graduates have a 84% placement rate, earning $36,628 per year. 55% are continuing their education.  Non-credit certificate graduates have a 78% placement rate, earning $39,264 per year. 22% are continuing their education. Source: Florida Department of Education, Florida College Vocational Report, 2009-2010 Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program, Florida State College at Jacksonville.
  • 17. The Value of Certificate Programs “Among policymakers, practitioners, and other stakeholders, a growing consensus emerged that certificates requiring less than one year of study have little economic value. Evidence is presented that suggests that this option is overstated.– Dr. Anthony Carnevale” Source: Carnevale, A., Rose, S., Hanson, A., (2012), Certificates: Gateway to Gainful Employment and College Degrees. Georgetown University; Center on Education and the Workforce.
  • 18. Impact of Certificates at FSCJ Certificates 1 semester in length (11 to 12 credit hours)  54% of graduates continue their education  85% are placed in field, continue their education, or join the military  Yearly earnings = $52,164 Certificates 2 semesters in length (13 to 24 credit hours)  60% of graduates continue their education  86% are placed in field, or continue their education or join the military  Yearly earnings = $32,768 Certificates 3 semesters or longer in length (+24 credit hrs)  53% of graduates continue their education  80% are placed in field, or continue their education or join the military  Yearly Earnings = $42,220 Source: Florida Department of Education, Florida College Vocational Report, 2009-2010 Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program, Florida State College at Jacksonville.
  • 19. Good Program Design  Limit Program Options  FSCJ Practice 1:2 Ratio on Electives  Limit “Or” Statements  Remove Hidden and Non- Enforceable Prerequisites  Remove Structural Barriers  Capitalize on Program Cluster SynergyAdapted From: D. Jenkis, S. Cho, 2012, Get with the Program: Accelerating CommunityCollege Students’ Entry into and Completion of Programs of Study, CCRC Working PaperNo. 32. Columbia College Teachers College, Community College Research Center
  • 20. Program Cluster Synergy Take Advantage of Synergistic Opportunities Accounting (46 to 47 hrs)Common Core with an Aviation Management (40 hrs)Embedded Certificate Business Administrative Support (26 to 27 hrs) Hospitality Management (43 hrs) Logistics Management (29 to 30 hrs)
  • 21. Strengthen On-Line CoursesWhat are you doing to bolster and strengthen youronline courses? Student are more likely to fail or withdrawal from a fully online course as compared to a face-to-face course. Students who took online coursework in early terms were significantly less likely to return to college in subsequent terms. Students who took a high proportion of credits online were significantly less likely to attain an educational award or transfer to a four-year institution. Source: Xu, D., Jaggars, S.; March 2011, Online and Hybrid Course Enrollment and Performance in Washington State Community and Technical Colleges. CCRC Working Paper No. 31. Columbia College Teachers College, Community College Research Center.
  • 22. Sirius Course Elements Infusion of Mastery Learning  Research based Constructivist Approach  Activities grounded in everyday content  Topics with multiple perspectives  Collaboration Cooperative Learning  Social engagement  Group Projects
  • 23. Embedded Active Learning Strategies  Cooperative Learning  Project Based Learning  Internships/Coops  Simulation  Learning Communities  Supplemental Instruction  Technology Enhanced Classes  “Right Start” Orientation  On-going Active Teaching Strategy Training for Faculty
  • 24. Advising Action #1Talk with Students before theyWithdrawals from a Class Nationally, a student who receives a “W” on 20% or more of the credits they attempted decreases the probability of graduation within 3 years by 51%. In Florida community colleges, a student who receives a “W” on 20% or more of the credits they attempted decreases the probability of graduation within 3 years by 83%.
  • 25. Advising Action #2 57.90% Tell Your Students 60% the Importance of 50% Earning 20 credit 40% hours in a Year 19.40% 30%  A FTIC who earns 20 20% credit hours is 2.98 x’s more likely to graduate 10% than a student who 0% doesn’t earn 20 credit Earned 20+ Credits in First year in First Year Did Not Earn 20 Credits hours.Source: Colleen, Moore, Nancy Shulock, Jermey Ofenstein, October 2009, Steps toSuccess: Analyzing Milestone Achievement to Improve Community College StudentOutcomes, Institute for Higher Education Leadership & Policy.
  • 26. Advising Action #3 Let Students Know 60% 45% about the 50% Importance of 40% Summer Enrollment 30%  A FTIC student who is 20% 14.5% continuously enrolled in their first year has a 3.1 x’s 10% higher graduation rate 0% than a student who did not Earned Summer Did Not Earn earn credits in the summer. Credits Summer CreditsSource: Colleen, Moore, Nancy Shulock, Jermey Ofenstein, October 2009, Steps to Success: AnalyzingMilestone Achievement to Improve Community College Student Outcomes, Institute for Higher EducationLeadership & Policy.
  • 27. Advising Action #4 70% Completed Course Did Not Complete Course Tell Your College 60% 61.10% Ready Students not 51.20% to Postpone CL 50% English or Math 40%  Students taking CL Math in 30% first two years have a 22% 21.20% 20% graduation rate that is 2.78 x’s greater. 10%  Students taking CL English in first two years have a 0% graduation rate that is 2.4x Complete CL Math Completed CL greater. in 2 Years English in 2 YearsSource: Colleen, Moore, Nancy Shulock, Jermey Ofenstein, October 2009, Steps to Success: AnalyzingMilestone Achievement to Improve Community College Student Outcomes, Institute for Higher EducationLeadership & Policy.
  • 28. Time for Action When: Student Misses the First Day of Class. Students who do not attend the first day of class reduce their chances of graduating with an associate or certificate by 27%. Student is Late with First Assignment. Students who failed to turn in their first assignment on time or failed to turn in the first assignment (regardless of the point value of the assignment) were 72% less likely to complete the course as compared to students who turned in the first assignment of time. Student Earns a “D” on First Assignment. Students earning a letter grade of “D” or lower on their fist assignment (regardless of the point value) were 84% less likely to complete the course as compared to students who scored “C” or better.
  • 29. Early Alert System Reminder “Early alert is the timely intervention for student experiencing academic difficulty or exhibiting behaviors that are counter-productive to student success PLUS a predictive modeling system that allows preemptive intervention for likely students in need.”Source: Entering StudentSuccess Institute
  • 30. Course Design Principles Take attendance.  “Class attendance is a better predictor of college grades than any other know predictor of academic performance.”  “Mandatory attendance policies appear to have a positive impact on average grades.”Source: Crede, M., Roch, S., & Kieszczynka, U.; (2012); Class Attendance in College: A Meta-Analytic Review of the Relationship of Class Attendance with Grades and Student Characteristics;Review of Educational Research; December 2012 82: 436-476, first published on November 2, 2012
  • 31. Course Design Principles More Frequent Assessments, Starting Earlier in the Term  “Student report increased control and voice in the classroom.”  “Faculty report that students are more involved in their own learning.”  “Students are more or much more satisfied with their class.”  “Increased metacognition and improved ability for students to monitor their own methods.” Sources: (1) Steadman, Mimi, M., (1994) Implementation and Impact of Classroom Assessment Techniques in Community Colleges; University of California, Berkeley, (UMI Microform no. 9528688). (2) Catlin, A., & Kalina, M., (1993) What is the Effect of the Cross/Angelo Model of Classroom Assessment on Student Outcome? A study of the Classroom Assessment Project at Eight California Community Colleges; Research projected funded by the California Community College Chancellor’s Office. Funds for Instructional Improvement Grant 92-0016.
  • 32. Course Design Principles More Frequent Assessments, Starting Earlier  “Student report increased control and voice in the classroom.”  “Faculty report that students are more involved in their own learning.”  “Students are more or much more satisfied with their class.”  “Increased metacognition and improved ability for students to monitor their own methods.” Sources: (1) Steadman, Mimi, M., (1994) Implementation and Impact of Classroom Assessment Techniques in Community Colleges; University of California, Berkeley, (UMI Microform no. 9528688). (2) Catlin, A., & Kalina, M., (1993) What is the Effect of the Cross/Angelo Model of Classroom Assessment on Student Outcome? A study of the Classroom Assessment Project at Eight California Community Colleges; Research projected funded by the California Community College Chancellor’s Office. Funds for Instructional Improvement Grant 92-0016.
  • 33. Course Design Principles Incorporate College Knowledge into the Classroom.  Gates Foundation funded a $2.5 million challenge to develop Apps around college knowledge. Winners to be announced on January 23, 2013  http://www.collegeknowledgechallenge.org/
  • 34. Battle of the TitiansLone Star College Harvard University  65% Part Time Students  70% Full Time Students  Commuter College  Residential University  Most Students are  Most Students are Not Working Working  50% Pell & Fed Loans  21% Pell & Fed. Loans  130+ Programs of Study  48 Programs of Study  Many First Generation  Most Are Not First College Students Generation Students
  • 35. Time-to-Degree Formula150% Graduation ( standard)  (Program Length in credit hours x 1.50)/30 = Years to complete degree or certificate; or  Program Length/20 200% Graduation (Common metric)  (Program Length x 2) = Years to complete degree or certificate; or  Program Length/15 Part-Time Graduation (Internal tool)  Program Length / Median credit hours successfully completed by part-time students Legend: Red Font = USDOE Formula; Blue Font = Shortcut Formula
  • 36. Associate Median Length = 66 hours 15% 13% 72% Program Length 60 to 64 65 to 69 70 or Longer
  • 37. Certificate Median Length = 30 hours 45% 26% 5% 24% Credit Hour Length 12 to 19 20 to 28 29 to 38 39 or higher
  • 38. Observations – Accounting Program Length – 66 to 67 Hours  Program is over 60 credit hours.  Program has a range of hours.  2 years to complete. No summer Large Number of Courses  72 courses; 255 credit hours  General Education “wildcard” electives  5 courses to support a 2/3 hour technical elective.  13% to 15% of total credit hours consist of electives. Pluses  CL English and Math required in the first year.  College 101 included in the Associate Degree and Certificates
  • 39. Observations – Culinary Program Length – 70 to 71 Hours  Program is over 60 credit hours.  Program has a range of hours.  2 years to complete. No Summer Large Number of Courses  110 courses; 317 credit hours  General Education “wildcard” electives  College 101 only in 1 Certificate  CL Math in 2nd year  15% to 17% of total credit hours consist of electives. All in general education. Pluses  CL English required in the first year.  College 101 included in the Associate Degree and 1 of 2 Certificates  No Technical Electives.
  • 40. Observations – Workplace Relations Program Length – 63 Hours  Don’t know how long to complete Large Number of Courses  159 courses; 500 credit hours  General Education “wildcard” electives  35% of total credit hours consist of electives.  No semester layout so when CL English and Math is suggested is unknown. Pluses  College 101 included in the Associate Degree.
  • 41. Observations – Supply Chain Program Length – 64 to 65 Hours  Program is over 60 credit hours.  Program has a range of hours.  2 years to complete. No Summer. Large Number of Courses  68 courses; 242 credit hours  Large number of math/science electives  No certificates Pluses  CL English and Math shown in the first term.  College 101 included in the Associate Degree  No Broad Technical Elective Options.  9% of total credit hours were electives.
  • 42. Florida Sources  URL for Florida State Colleges Program Frameworks: http://www.fldoe.org/workf orce/dwdframe.  Hint for Translating Florida Edu-speak to English  PSAV = Non-credit frameworks.  Everything else is creditSource: Destin Chamber of Commerce
  • 43. Impact of Program Design at FSCJ Total Programs250240 236230220 218210200190 26% Reduction in Total180 Programs 173170160150 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2009-2010 2010-2011
  • 44. Impact of Program Design at FSCJ Impact on FSCJ Associate Degrees  3%reduction in the median length of an Associate degree since 2000-2001  From 66.5 to 64.5 credit hours in length in 2010- 2011  17% gain in projected (Theoretical) graduation rate  11.4% gain for full time students  30% gain for part time students
  • 45. Impact of Program Design at FSCJ Impact on Certificate Programs  63% increase in the number of certificate programs since 2000-2001.  From 60 to 98 certificate programs in 2010-2011  76% increase in the number of certificate programs that are 20 credit hours or less in length since 2000-2001  From 29 to 51 certificate programs that are 20 credit hours or less in length
  • 46. Quality Trend Lines3530 Florida Coast Career Tech Division2520 Military, Public Safety, & Security15 Division Florida State College at Jacksonville10 5 Florida State College Division0 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012
  • 47. Lessons Learned  Control credit creep by limiting program length  Establish model for three-year and four-year semester-by- semester road maps for all programs  Simplify your Programs (Limit Options)Adapted from: Complete College America; (2011); Three Policies to ReduceTime to Degree: Complete College America: Washington D.C.
  • 48. Lessons LearnedFocus Strategies on Part Time Students Source: Complete College American (2011) September, 2011 Time is the Enemy: The surprising truth about why today’s college students aren’t graduating and what needs to change
  • 49. Lessons LearnedMaximize Program Design  Review your programs for hidden prerequisites.  Reduce elective options to no more than 10% of your program length.  If you think you have too many embedded certificate programs you probably don’t.
  • 50. Lessons LearnedAdvising for Impact “The problem of excessive, no penalty withdraws and numerous course repeats affects 10% of a cohort. Institutional policy and advising can cut the incidence of withdrawals and repeats by half.” – Clifford Adelman
  • 51. Lessons LearnedMost Attrition is NOT Caused by Academic Failure“Over 40% of attrition costs nationwide are attributableto students who leave with grade point averages in theA & B range. Attrition associated with poor academicperformance (i.e., students leaving with C averages orbelow) accounts for just 15% of attrition costs.” – DeltaCost Project Source: Johnson, N., September 2012; Delta Cost Project Research Paper: The Institutional Costs of Student Attrition; Delta Cost Project, American Institutes for Research
  • 52. Lessons LearnedPromote Active Learning Strategies  Patience is the key. The payoff in higher graduation rates is three to five years in the future
  • 53. Rethinking College Practices Connection Entry Progress Completion From interest to From enrollment to From program entry to From program enrollment entry into a program of 75% of program completion to study requirements credential of value for completed further education and labor market advancement Design (at scale) and align with every stageSource: Jenkins, D., January 2011, Redesigning Community Colleges for Completion: Lessons from Research onHigh –Performance Organizations, CCRC Working Paper No. 24; Columbia University TeacherCollege, Community College Research Center
  • 54. Contact Information Jim SimpsonAssociate Vice President of Degree and Career Programs Florida State College at Jacksonville 501 West State Street Jacksonville, FL 32202 E-mail: simpsonjamesd@gmail.com