5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Avoiding unintentional plagiarism can result in considerable stres...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />As with other strategies for avoiding unintentional plagiarism, th...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />The key is to consider your rhetorical purpose.<br />What are you ...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />The basic principles for using paraphrases, summaries, and indirec...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Use a paraphrase if the details are so important that you want som...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />The guidelines for choosing a direct quotation are a little more c...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Use a direct quotation when:<br />You are responding to (agreeing ...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Use a direct quotation when:<br />You like the way your source sai...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Use a direct quotation when:<br />You haven’t used many quotations...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />REMINDER:<br />YOU SHOULD USE QUOTATION MARKS TO INDICATE A DIRECT...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />CHOOSE WISELY.<br />Although quotation marks help you avoid uninte...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />In some discourse communities, paraphrase and summary are favored ...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />If you’re writing a paper for a class in the social sciences like ...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Sometimes your sources may be charts, tables, graphs, or other ima...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Do NOT use visuals to pad your paper. <br />Many instructors judge...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Place a visual (chart, table, graph, or other image) as close to t...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Table 1. Mean Numbers of Claims, Data, and Backing<br />
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Place a label for other visual images with Fig. (for Figure), an A...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Fig. 1. Fine-grained Description.<br />
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />If the image contains source information, you don’t need an entry ...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Fig. 1. Fine-grained Description.<br />Source: Massengill, Sonya. ...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />SURVIVAL TIPS:<br />There are many ways to take notes, as an earli...
5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Let’s practice.<br />Locate a scholarly, peer-reviewed article in ...
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Plagiarism 5.1.4

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  • Of nine low-scoring essays, 6 included 4 or fewer claims.The other three included 7, 17, and 20 claims. The mean number of total claims (6.33) represented a wide range of total claims (0-20) but a much narrower range of supported claims (0-4).Low-scoring essays included a mean of 5.22 connected elements of TM.Middle-scoring essays included a mean of 12.High scoring-essays included a mean of 21.33. The highest scoring essay (7) included 34 connected elements of the TM.
  • What I learned
  • What I learned
  • Plagiarism 5.1.4

    1. 1. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />
    2. 2. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Avoiding unintentional plagiarism can result in considerable stress as you try to determine how to manage your sources and still make everything flow together smoothly.<br />Distinguishing between when to use a direct quotation and when to use a paraphrase, summary, or indirect quotation is not an exact science.<br />
    3. 3. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />As with other strategies for avoiding unintentional plagiarism, the best way to develop this skill is to read extensively in your discourse community.<br />There are also some general principles that can help you make decisions about how to integrate your sources.<br />
    4. 4. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />The key is to consider your rhetorical purpose.<br />What are you trying to accomplish by including information from another source?<br />
    5. 5. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />The basic principles for using paraphrases, summaries, and indirect quotations are fairly simple.<br />
    6. 6. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Use a paraphrase if the details are so important that you want something about the same length as the original so that you don’t omit an important point.<br />Use a summary if you just want to include an idea you found in one of your sources, but you don’t need all the detail.<br />Use an indirect quotation if you just want to refer briefly to a specific idea in your source.<br />
    7. 7. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />The guidelines for choosing a direct quotation are a little more complicated, and they’re not absolute rules.<br />They should give you something to look for in scholarly articles as you try to learn to write like the experts in your academic community.<br />
    8. 8. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Use a direct quotation when:<br />You are responding to (agreeing or disagreeing or qualifying) an idea in a source, and you need to clearly convey the original author’s ideas.<br />Note: If you are NOT agreeing or disagreeing or qualifying ideas in your sources, you may be writing something closer to a middle school book report than a college-level academic paper, and this is NOT a good thing. You will probably get a low grade even if you don’t get in trouble for unintentional plagiarism.<br />
    9. 9. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Use a direct quotation when:<br />You like the way your source said something, and you can’t create the same impact with your own words.<br />You need particular factual details that it’s hard to convey – and senseless – to try to reword.<br />
    10. 10. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Use a direct quotation when:<br />You haven’t used many quotations, and your text feels dull and monotonous.<br />Note: If you are writing in the social sciences, use very few, if any, direct quotations. If your text is still dull and monotonous, find another way to spruce it up.<br />
    11. 11. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />REMINDER:<br />YOU SHOULD USE QUOTATION MARKS TO INDICATE A DIRECT QUOTATION ANY TIME YOU USE AN AUTHOR’S EXACT WORDS – EVEN IF IT’S JUST TWO. . . .<br />
    12. 12. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />CHOOSE WISELY.<br />Although quotation marks help you avoid unintentional plagiarism, they can get distracting and make it look like you didn’t have any part in the composition of your paper – other than possibly the role of a scribe.<br />
    13. 13. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />In some discourse communities, paraphrase and summary are favored over direct quotes. <br />If you’re writing a paper for a literature class, lots of direct quotations are common, and you’re probably citing them with MLA format.<br />
    14. 14. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />If you’re writing a paper for a class in the social sciences like psychology or sociology or education, direct quotations are much less common, and there’s a good chance your instructor is requiring you to use APA format.<br />In fact, in the social sciences, writers often summarize ideas from three or four research studies and then list all the authors in one incredibly long parenthetical citation.<br />
    15. 15. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Sometimes your sources may be charts, tables, graphs, or other images. Most often you will want to summarize their findings in prose in your paper.<br />If you think the visual image will explain a point best, be sure to get permission to use it if needed, and always cite your source.<br />
    16. 16. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Do NOT use visuals to pad your paper. <br />Many instructors judge length by word count.<br />Those who give suggested page lengths are not confused when your paper consists of three pages of writing and two pages of pictures.<br />The images risk distracting from your argument, so ONLY use them when they STRENGTHEN your paper – not as filler or decoration. <br />
    17. 17. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Place a visual (chart, table, graph, or other image) as close to the text where you are discussing it as possible. Avoid distracting breaks in your text.<br />Place a label for a table, an Arabic numeral, and a title ABOVE the table.<br />
    18. 18. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Table 1. Mean Numbers of Claims, Data, and Backing<br />
    19. 19. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Place a label for other visual images with Fig. (for Figure), an Arabic numeral, and a caption BELOW the image, using the same margins as the rest of the paper. <br />
    20. 20. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Fig. 1. Fine-grained Description.<br />
    21. 21. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />If the image contains source information, you don’t need an entry in the Works Cited page. See the MLA Handbook, Section 4.5 for more information.<br />
    22. 22. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Fig. 1. Fine-grained Description.<br />Source: Massengill, Sonya. “Preparing Students for College-Level Writing: An Application of the Toulmin Model to Arguments about Literature.” MA thesis. NC State University, 2010. Print.<br />
    23. 23. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />SURVIVAL TIPS:<br />There are many ways to take notes, as an earlier lesson in this tutorial explained. Some of that comes down to personal preference.<br />If you are not sure about whether you want to use information as a paraphrase, summary, or quotation, it might be wise to record your note as a quotation.<br />You can make up your mind later, but you’ll have the original to work with, which saves a lot of frustration when you decide you want a quote but are running out of time to go back and look at the source again.<br />
    24. 24. 5.1.4 Distinguishing When to Use Direct Quotations<br />Let’s practice.<br />Locate a scholarly, peer-reviewed article in your field of interest.<br />Skim through the article to determine whether the author uses more direct quotations or paraphrases, summaries, and indirect quotations.<br />Explain why you think authors in this discourse community might use this style of source management.<br />
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