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5.1.3  Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />In this lesson, you will learn to distinguish between effe...
5.1.3  Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />There are two problems to address in integrating quotation...
5.1.3  Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />As a general rule, don’t try to start a quotation in the m...
5.1.3  Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Awkward:<br /><ul><li>Thoreau argued that individuals have...
5.1.3  Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />As an alternative, if you want to start in the middle of a...
5.1.3  Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Improved:<br /><ul><li>Thoreau argued that individuals hav...
5.1.3  Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Use a colon after you introduce a direct quotation when th...
Thoreau argued, “That government is best which governs least . . .” (226).
“That government is best,” according to Thoreau, “which governs least . . .” (226).</li></li></ul><li>5.1.3  Effective and...
Correct: Thoreau argued that “[i]t is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right” (227).</...
5.1.3  Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Is it clear WHY you are using a quotation? Don’t assume th...
5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Let’s practice:<br />The best way to get better at integrat...
5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Work Cited<br />Thoreau, Henry David. “Resistance to Civil ...
Plagiarism 5.1.3
Plagiarism 5.1.3
Plagiarism 5.1.3
Plagiarism 5.1.3
Plagiarism 5.1.3
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Plagiarism 5.1.3

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ECI 716 5.1.3

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Transcript of "Plagiarism 5.1.3"

  1. 1. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />In this lesson, you will learn to distinguish between effective and ineffective integration of quotations.<br />
  2. 2. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />There are two problems to address in integrating quotations in your own text.<br />One is losing your voice in the paper.<br />The other is just sounding awkward. <br />They often feed upon each other, so the guidelines for avoiding the problems overlap to some degree.<br />
  3. 3. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />As a general rule, don’t try to start a quotation in the middle of a sentence from an original source and continue with one or more new sentences in the quotation.<br />This takes quite a bit of sophistication to make work, and unless you’re really good at it, or have lots of time for revising, avoid the problem.<br />
  4. 4. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Awkward:<br /><ul><li>Thoreau argued that individuals have “the right to refuse allegiance to and to resist government, when its tyranny or its inefficiency are great and unendurable. But almost all say that such is not the case now” (229).</li></ul>The reference to “now” connects a statement about a general principle with a comment about a historical situation and creates an awkward mix of present and past tense.<br />
  5. 5. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />As an alternative, if you want to start in the middle of a sentence, try:<br />quoting that segment, <br />then interrupting with your commentary, <br />and then continuing with the quote that begins a new sentence<br />
  6. 6. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Improved:<br /><ul><li>Thoreau argued that individuals have “the right to refuse allegiance to and to resist government, when its tyranny or its inefficiency are great and unendurable.” He further asserted that “almost all [said] that such [was] not the case right now” (229).</li></li></ul><li>5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Even Better:<br /><ul><li>Thoreau argued that individuals have “the right to refuse allegiance to and to resist government, when its tyranny or its inefficiency are great and unendurable.” His observation that “almost all say that such is not the case right now” is as relevant today as it was when his words were first published (229).</li></ul>Now you are engaging in a discussion and submitting your position for consideration.<br />
  7. 7. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Use a colon after you introduce a direct quotation when that introduction could function as a complete sentence.<br /><ul><li>Thoreau made a startling statement that many individuals still believe today: “That government is best which governs least . . .” (227).</li></li></ul><li>5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Use commas to set off introductory tags or interruptions markers.<br /><ul><li>According to Thoreau, “That government is best which governs least . . .” (226).
  8. 8. Thoreau argued, “That government is best which governs least . . .” (226).
  9. 9. “That government is best,” according to Thoreau, “which governs least . . .” (226).</li></li></ul><li>5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Do NOT use commas to set off your introductory tag or interruption marker when it ends with that. <br /><ul><li>Incorrect: Thoreau argued that, “It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right” (227).
  10. 10. Correct: Thoreau argued that “[i]t is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right” (227).</li></li></ul><li>5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Avoid stringing quotes together. Never end one quotation and immediately start another one. <br /><ul><li>Awkward: Thoreau argued that the American government “is a sort of wooden gun to the people themselves, and if ever they should use it in earnest as a real one against each other, it will surely split” (226). “But it is not the less necessary for this” (226).</li></li></ul><li>5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Somewhat better , but not much:<br /><ul><li>Thoreau argued that the American government “is a sort of wooden gun to the people themselves, and if ever they should use it in earnest as a real one against each other, it will surely split” (226). He then said, “But it is not the less necessary for this” (226).</li></li></ul><li>5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Instead, insert your position in the argument. This can be simple or more complex. <br /><ul><li>Thoreau argued that the American government “is a sort of wooden gun to the people themselves, and if ever they should use it in earnest as a real one against each other, it will surely split” (226). As he correctly observed, however, “it is not the less necessary for this” (226).</li></li></ul><li>5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />You could even break it up with more of your voice.<br /><ul><li>Thoreau argued that the American government “is a sort of wooden gun to the people themselves, and if ever they should use it in earnest as a real one against each other, it will surely split” (226). While this may be true, abandoning government entirely would be a foolish course of action. As he correctly continued, “it is not the less necessary for this” (226).</li></li></ul><li>5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Other strategies:<br />Read aloud sections of your text that use quotations. Are they awkward? You may need to do a little of your own talking to make the statement make sense.<br />If you wouldn’t have connected the ideas this way if the words were all your own, there’s probably a problem to be fixed. <br />
  11. 11. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Is it clear WHY you are using a quotation? Don’t assume that the audience can read your mind. If you need to explain the inclusion of the information, do it.<br />Remember that your voice is supposed to dominate the paper – not your sources – even when it is appropriate to provide extensive evidence and frequent quotations to support your argument.<br />
  12. 12. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Let’s practice:<br />The best way to get better at integrating sources is to observe how experts do it. <br />Locate a scholarly, peer-reviewed article on a topic of interest to you.<br />Identify 10 examples of effectively integrated quotations and explain (1) what they have done to make the quotations avoid awkwardness AND (2) how they have kept their own voices dominant in the article. <br />
  13. 13. 5.1.3 Effective and Ineffective Integration of Quotations<br />Work Cited<br />Thoreau, Henry David. “Resistance to Civil Government.” WaldenandResistance to Civil Government. Ed. William Rossi. New York: Norton, 1992. 226-245. Print.<br />
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