5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />
5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />In this lesson, you will learn to apply strategies for integrating paraphrases, sum...
5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Place parenthetical citations at the end of the text (a phrase, clause, sentence, o...
5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Place “markers” to distinguish between your ideas and those from your sources, even...
5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Ineffective integration of a source:<br />Wind power is an important but under-used...
5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Effective integration of a source:<br />Jacobson is correct when he asserts that wi...
5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />If it takes more than one sentence to summarize or paraphrase an idea you are using...
5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Example:<br />Jacobson noted the importance of wind power as an under-utilized reso...
5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Review:<br />Let’s review by seeing what the experts do. <br />(1) Find a scholarly...
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Plagiarism 5.1.1

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Transcript of "Plagiarism 5.1.1"

  1. 1. 5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />
  2. 2. 5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />In this lesson, you will learn to apply strategies for integrating paraphrases, summaries, and indirect quotations in your text. <br />To avoid unintentional plagiarism, you must distinguish between your ideas and ideas from your sources.<br />
  3. 3. 5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Place parenthetical citations at the end of the text (a phrase, clause, sentence, or paragraph) that includes the borrowed information.<br />The citation should be as close to the borrowed information as possible without distracting the reader from the text.<br />Most often, you should place it at the end of the sentence in which the borrowed information appears.<br />
  4. 4. 5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Place “markers” to distinguish between your ideas and those from your sources, even if your contribution is just to agree or disagree with the author of your source.<br />
  5. 5. 5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Ineffective integration of a source:<br />Wind power is an important but under-used source of energy (Jacobson 32).<br />This sounds like an opinion, not a fact, and you could have come up with this on your own without Jacobson. You are probably referring to his idea because you deem him an expert, so show that you understand that it is an opinion, but you think it’s a good one. Consider adding in Jacobson’s credentials if you haven’t already done so in order to establish why you are bothering to include his opinion.<br />
  6. 6. 5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Effective integration of a source:<br />Jacobson is correct when he asserts that wind power is an important but under-used source of energy (32).<br /> Even better integration of a source:<br />Decisions about energy sources are always complicated, but as Robert Jacobson, President of the National Council on Energy, suggests, wind power is an important but under-used resource (32).<br />
  7. 7. 5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />If it takes more than one sentence to summarize or paraphrase an idea you are using from another source, clarify which information comes from that source by using an in-text citation at the beginning of a section and a parenthetical citation at the end of the section.<br />
  8. 8. 5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Example:<br />Jacobson noted the importance of wind power as an under-utilized resource. Although much attention has been given to solar energy in the United States, several European countries have explored wind power with impressive results (Jacobson 32).<br />Without the in-text citation AND the parenthetical citation, the reader would not be sure that the information about European countries also came from Jacobson. Now, the boundaries are clear.<br />
  9. 9. 5.1.1 Integrating Sources in Text<br />Review:<br />Let’s review by seeing what the experts do. <br />(1) Find a scholarly, peer-reviewed article on a topic of interest to you, and identify five examples demonstrating the effective integration of paraphrase, summary, or indirect quotation.<br />(2) Explain why each example is effective.<br />
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