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Sexual Activity during Adolescence: Risks, statistics, and influences involving pre-marital sex

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  • this is very important information to our youth thank you
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  • The risks, statistics, and influences that are incorporated in an adolescent’s sexual activity are investigated. The following literature reviews demonstrate and support the hypothesis.
  • Sexual activity during adolescence causes an increase in teen moms, sexually transmitted infections (STI’s), school drop-outs, and higher effects on adolescent’s psychological state. To prevent or reduce the consequences of adolescents being sexually active, interventions, education, and awareness are used. . A meta-analysis involving youth-focused intervention/prevention programs aimed at delaying sexual activity and reducing risky behaviors found no evidence of having beneficial effects (DiCenso et al., 2002). On the other hand, Brody et al. (2006) found that numerous family intervention techniques that focus on parent-child communication, parental monitoring, involved parenting, and limit settings have shown a dramatic effect on these outcomes.
  • Friedlander et al. (2007), focused on the influences that were involved in decisions that are involved in sexual activity during adolescence. This study examined 784 adolescents (394 boys and 390 girls). These boys and girls were followed for a year; they all were enrolled in grades 5, 6, and 7th. The hypothesis in this study was that biology, family, and peer influences were involved in dating in early adolescence, which would increase the risk of having sexual contact with their partner.
  • Parental monitoring was found to be a major factor in this area. Putting attention to their children and tracking their whereabouts was found to decrease the adolescent’s sexual activity.
  • “Peers set an example for the adolescent and the adolescent imitates the behavior of valued others because of a general desire to look and behave as their peers do” (Friedlander et al., (2007). Most adolescents want to fit in, if it requires to have intimate relations with their partner it will happen.
  • Not only is peers and parents involved in influencing an adolescent… Pubertal maturation in adolescence is also involved. The more knowledge and maturity an adolescent maintains an increase in having pre-marital sex is seen. Findings of this research conjoined all of the three influences that were being studied and found that pubertal maturation was involved most in sexual and dating activities but with proper parental guidance and good peer experiences it would reduce the risks involved in adolescent sexual activity dramatically. The strengths from this research involves the extensive detail on all of the areas. As for the weakness of the research is that it was not a longitudinal study.
  • The environment influence research found that economic status does have an effect. The poor neighborhoods has an increased percentage in adolescent females being sexually active. The weakness in this research was that the participants in where mostly white. This will not give a chance to explore the different backgrounds and ethnicities. The strength of this research is that most of the information correlates to the other researches that have been done before.
  • The media research conclusion found that more exposure to adult based television and movies leads to earlier sexual activity they also found that restrictions on the hours per day should be applied. The strength of this study was that the information was gathered from a longitudinal study. As for the negative, it could have biased information given by the researcher who was involved with the longitudinal research.
  • In a research article by Forhan et al. (2009), focused on the prevalence of STI’s. The research involved 838 females who were within the ages of 14 to 19. Among these young women 37.7% were sexually experienced and 24.1% of them showed having one of the five STI’s mentioned. “These findings support early and comprehensive sex education, routine HPV vaccination at the age of 11 to 12 years, and C trachomatis screening of sexually active female adolescents” (Forhan et al., 2009). The results provided by this article could be incorrect due to the inaccurate information that participants gave. The strength in this article is that the participants were personally interviewed. The participants were also examined physically and provided laboratory results from the specimens that were given.
  • Adolescents that have a strong healthy relationship with their parents reduce the risks of having a sexually active life. An assumption can be made from these literature reviews that at an early age children are influenced by parental involvement, where they live, peers, and maturity. Due to the insufficient longitudinal studies, more longitudinal studies should be done. It is imperative to understand adolescent sexual behavior and how different lifestyles may affect their future in their sexually active lives.
  • Thank-you for your time and hope you enjoyed it!

Sexual Activity during Adolescence: Risks, statistics, and influences involving pre-marital sex Sexual Activity during Adolescence: Risks, statistics, and influences involving pre-marital sex Presentation Transcript

  • Sexual Activity during Adolescence:
    Risks, statistics, and influences involving pre-marital sex.
  • Nearly half of all 15-19 year olds in the United States have had sex at least once…
  • What influences drives them to have pre-marital sex?
  • FAMILY…
    • Putting attention to their children
    • Spending time with them
    • Talking about sexual relations and their consequences
    • Knowing their whereabouts
  • PEERS…
    • Peers add pressure
    • Friends follow friends
    • The “FITTING IN” factor
  • BIOLOGY…
    The more intense pubertal maturation an adolescent has, the higher the sexual activity is seen.
  • The environment is also an influence?
    Parents working more
  • MEDIA is a huge influence…
    More exposure leads to more sexual action…
    Kids should be limited to at most 1-2 hours per day
    Kids should not have a TV in their room
    Most sexual facts are informed through the media
    Abercrombie and Fitch Ads
  • Consequences
    Increase in Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI’s)
    Increase in Unwanted pregnancies
    Higher school drop out rates
    Increase in help for low income families
  • ADOLESCENTS NEED?
  • References
    Abma J. C. (2003). Teenagers in the United States: sexual activity, contraceptive use, and childbearing. Vital and Health Statistics, 23 ( 24).
    American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Public Education. American Academy of Pediatrics: children, adolescents, and television. Pediatrics. 2001;107 :423 –426[Abstract/Free Full Text]
    Brody, G.H., Murry, V.M., Kogan, S.M., Gerrard, M., Gibbons, F.X., Molgaard, V., Brown, A.C., Anderson, T., Chen, Y., Luo, Z., & Wills, T.A. (2006). The Strong African American Families Program: A cluster-randomized prevention trial of long-term effects and a mediational model. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74(2),
    356-366.
    Bronfenbrenner, U., & Morris, P. A. (1998). The ecology of human development. In W. Damon (Series Ed.) & R. M. Lerner (Vol. Ed.), Handbook of child psychology, Vol 1: Theoretical models of human development (5th ed., pp. 993-1028). New York: Wiley.
    Children’s Hospital Boston; Children who view adult- targeted TV may become sexually active earlier in life. (2009). Biotech Week, 3039. Retrieved from ProQuest Health and Medical Complette. Document ID: 1707945831
    Commendador, K. A. (2010).Parental Influences on Adolescents Decision Making and Contraceptive Use. Pediatric Nursing, 36 (3), 147.
    Commendador, K. A. (2007). The relationship between female adolescent self-esteem, decision making, and contraceptive behavior. Journal of the American Academy of NursePractitioners, 19(11), 614-23.  Retrieved September 18, 2010, from ProQuest Health and Medical Complete. (Document ID: 1385010131).
  • References Cont.
    DiCenso, A., Guyatt, G., Willan, A., & Griffith, L. (2002). Interventions to reduce unintended pregnancies among adolescents: systematic review of randomized controlled trials. BMJ, 324, 1426.
    Friedlander, L., Connolly, J., Pepler, D., & Craig, W.. (2007). Biological, Familial, and Peer Influences on Dating in Early Adolescence. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 36(6), 821-30.  Retrieved September 18, 2010, from Research Library. (Document ID: 1396577251).
    Guttmacher Institute. (2010). U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity. Retrieved from http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/FB-ATSRH.html#9
    Gravenor, K. (2005). Poverty in Montreal: Where it’s at, where it came from, where it’s going. Retrieved from http://www.montrealmirror.com/2005/102005/watn24.html
    Katchadourian, H. (1990). Sexuality. In S. S. Feldman & G. R. Elliot (Eds.), At the threshold: The developing adolescent (pp. 330-351). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
    Marcia, J. E. (1980). Identity in adolescence. In J. Adleson (Ed.), Handbook of adolescent psychology (pp. 159-187). New York: Wiley.
    Schofield, H., Bierman, K., Heinrichs, B., & Nix, R.. (2008). Predicting Early Sexual Activity with Behavior Problems Exhibited at School Entry and in Early Adolescence. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 36(8), 1175-88.  Retrieved September 18, 2010, from Research Library. (Document ID: 1571804951).
    University of Montreal; Troubled girls from poor neighborhoods more likely to have sex in early adolescence. (2008, October). Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week,190.  Retrieved September 18, 2010, from Research Library. (Document ID: 1560499401)
    Wimberly, Y. (2005). STDs, pregnancy risk, and fertility: Practical tips to address adolescent misconceptions and reproductive needs. Retrieved from http://www.srm-ejournal.com/article.asp?AID=8610