Understanding e government in edinburgh

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his report summarises the e-government context in Edinburgh, based on interviews with staff from the city, and identifies factors that they feel shape their local e-government context and their involvement in the Smart Cities project. The local e-government environment varies tremendously across the North Sea Region of the EU, with municipal strategies being shaped by very different national, regional and local policy contexts and political and technological agendas. This is the fifth of a series of six reports summarising the local e-government environment in six municipalities from six different countries who are participating in the Smart Cities Interreg IVb project.

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Understanding e government in edinburgh

  1. 1. Understanding e-governmentin EdinburghSummary & ContextThe local e-government environment varies tremendously across theNorth Sea Region of the EU, with municipal strategies being shaped byvery different national, regional and local policy contexts and political Project Context Mapand technological agendas. This series of reports summarises the locale-government environment in six municipalities from six different countries No.5who are participating in the Smart Cities Interreg IVb project. The reportsallow project partners to review their local e-government context, and helpsus identify to common factors across project partners, along with areas ofdifference between partners. This report summarises the e-governmentcontext in Edinburgh, based on interviews with staff from the Council, andidentifies factors that they feel shape their local e-government context andtheir involvement in the Smart Cities project.As well as a narrative description of the context, this report contains twodiagrams: • Main policy drivers • Context diagram covering the projects that they feel are most relevant to Smart Cities • Details of the entities mentioned including links to source material, in English where available.The information in this document is derived from descriptions supplied by Key Facts:directly by staff at the City of Edinburgh Council (referred to as Edinburgh orCEC from now), supplemented by desk-based research. Edinburgh Local Authority in devolvedThe Project Context UK region of ScotlandFigure 1 illustrates the organisations that Edinburgh has identified as being Populations:significant to the City’s involvement in the Smart Cities project, showing thestrategies and drivers Edinburgh City – 478 000 Scotland – 5 194 000The main top level driver for Edinburgh’s participation in the project (along UK – 62 042 000with all project partners) is INTERREG IVB North Sea, funded by theEuropean Union (EU).The INTERREG initiative is designed to strengthen economic and socialcohesion throughout the European Union, by fostering the balanceddevelopment of the continent through cross-border, transnational andinterregional cooperation. A principal aim of the Programme is to expandthe scope of territorial cooperation and focus on high quality projects ininnovation, the environment, accessibility, and sustainable and competitivecommunities.The 2007-2013 Programme connects regions from seven countries aroundthe North Sea, incorporating policy level planning and the long lastingand tangible effects of projects. The North Sea Region Programme 2007-2013 works with cutting edge policy areas in regional development throughtransnational projects.Smart Cities is one of the projects funded through the programme. The generalaim of the Smart Cities project is to create an innovation network betweengovernments and academic partners leading to excellence in the domain ofthe development and take-up of e-services. Edinburgh’s involvement in theproject’s work is focussed on customer services (WP3), and wireless city(WP4) workpackages.
  2. 2. Europe European Union Regional Development INTERREG IVB Best practice PORISM sharing UK I&DEA ESD Toolkit Scottish Building a Better Pathfinder Government Scotland reports Customer first Scotland Local Government in Scotland Act COSLA National Infrastructure Improvement Service Citizen Scottish Account Services List Police, Fire, UoE Edinburgh Napier NHS Edinburgh Partnership Efficiency/Cost saving Edinburgh Best value Excellence Customer service SOA City of Edinburgh Council Corporate Strategy Smart Cities BT PLC Fig 1: Main policy drivers for City of EDinburghNB All items are linked to or supporting Smart Cities
  3. 3. National level – UK, ScotlandThe nature of the relationship between Scotland and central UK governmentis not a federal one: in many cases, the UK and Scottish government will berunning their own programmes in the same area; sometimes there is confusionover whether ‘UK’ programmes do in fact also include Scotland, or are intendedonly for England (or England and Wales). Reflecting this, descriptions of UK andScottish activities in Figure 1 are interleaved in this section. Moreover, in the caseof Smart Cities, there are no UK level departments or projects that are affectingEdinburgh’s engagement with the project.The Scottish Government is responsible for all local authorities, includingEdinburgh. The Local Government in Scotland Act 2003 contained a packageof measures intended to support local determination and to deliver better,more responsive, public services. The three core elements are interlinked,Best Value, Community Planning and the Power to Advance Wellbeing. BestValue is a central, enduring foundation for continuous improvement across thepublic sector and places the emphasis on the customer, while having regard toeconomy, efficiency, effectiveness, equal opportunities requirements and to theachievement of sustainable development. Edinburgh’s shared services agendais now being progressed as part of the Alternative Business Models programme,replacing the Pathfinder Reports.The government allocates local authorities a budget for a three year settlementperiod at each Spending Review to provide more certainty and stability for localauthorities as a result of knowing their individual revenue and capital allocationsfor three years. When the current government came into office in 2007, ringfencing of local government funding was ended and replaced by the creation ofa Single Outcome Agreement (SOA). SOAs underpin the funding provided tolocal government over the period 2008-09 to 2010-2011. They are agreementsbetween the Scottish Government, Local Authorities and Community PlanningPartnerships (CPP)s which set out how each will work in the future towardsimproving outcomes for the local people in a way that reflects local circumstancesand priorities, within the context of the Government’s 15 National Outcomes andPurpose. All of the outcome agreements are uniquely shaped to reflect the needsand circumstances of the areas they cover and designed to ensure local peopleknow exactly what their CPP is committed to provide on their behalf.I&DeA, the Improvement & Development Agency is a subsidiary of the (English)Local Government Association. It has been used as an inspiration and aresource for the Scottish Improvement Service (IS), which was set up in 2005help improve the efficiency, quality and accountability of local public services inScotland by providing advice, consultancy and programme support to councilsand their partners. Their purpose is to help councils and their partners to improvethe health, quality of life and opportunities of all people in Scotland throughcommunity leadership, strong local governance and the delivery of high quality,efficient local services. Stakeholders include the Scottish Government, COSLAand the Scottish Local Authorities.
  4. 4. Porism is a Smart Cities partner. Maintained in conjunction with I&DeA, Porism’sesd-toolkit publishes a list of some 600 customer facing services supplied bycouncils. The list results from co-operation between the Life Events AccessProject (LEAP) and a number of councils, some of whom previously publishedtheir own lists. The esd-toolkit is being implemented in Scotland as the ScottishServices List, which has been used as the basis for the A-Z service listing withinthe Web Services project.The Improvement Service is coordinating a number of national projects, of whichthe most relevant to Smart Cities is the National ICT Infrastructure project,which will supports joined up/shared services across Scottish local governmentas well as the wider public sector. It aims to deliver ‘first time’ public services byre-designing them around customers’ needs, also making use of the ScottishServices List (SSL).EdinburghThe City of Edinburgh Council (CEC) has powers over most matters of localadministration such as housing, planning, local transport, parks, economicdevelopment and regeneration.The local CPP (qv) is the Edinburgh Partnership, which apart from CEC includesrepresentation from the health service (NHS), police and fire services, regionaltransport and the local universities, including Edinburgh Napier University.The Single Outcome Agreement agreed between the Council, the EdinburghPartnership and the Scottish Government in 2009 now provides the Council’scorporate strategy, replacing the previous three-year corporate plan.A private company, BT PLC, is responsible for delivery and support of most ICTservices to CEC. A ten-year ICT partnership agreement was signed in 2001,focused on achieving the Council’s vision of being recognised as the UK leader indelivering modern, joined up and interactive public services using new technology.This shared vision is encapsulated in the Council’s Smart City ICT Strategy (norelation). In early 2006 a five year contract extension was agreed.Figure 2 shows how five divisions from three of the city’s six departments areengaged with the Smart Cities project. From Corporate Services, eGovernmentand Corporate Communications are working on a revised website, driven bya new content management system (CMS). eGovernment is also working withCustomer Services as part of the process change programme to implementcustomer journey mapping for users of services provided by Revenues &Benefits. Edinburgh Napier is working with CEC to create a case study for widerdissemination though Smart Cities.
  5. 5. Edinburgh Napier Programmes & BT PLC Projects Strategy Unit CMS/New website Smart City Vision The Council Process change Efficiency & Cost Savings eGovernment Journey Mapping Revenues and Achieving Benefits excellence Smart Cities WP3 Customer Corp Comms Services WirelessCustomer Services Libraries Libraries transformation Smart Citiesand info services People’s Network WP4 Fig 2: Projects most relevant to Smart Cities for Edinburgh City
  6. 6. Source information Table 1 Name: DWPDetails of significant entities www.dwp.gov.uk/local-authority-staff/housing-benefit Department of Work & Pensions: Funds Housing Benefits. CEC online service for the Housing Benefits part of its benefits online service and took part in the ‘Tell Us Once’ project. Name: IDEA www.idea.gov.uk Improvement & Development Agency: subsidiary of the Local Government Association (LGA). It was formed in 1998 to work in partnership with all councils in England and Wales, to serve people and places better, to enhance the performance of the best authorities, accelerate the speed of improvement of the rest, and develop the sector as a whole. Name: Porism Ltd & esd-toolkit www.porism.com Porism Limited is a progressive software company located in Brixton, London, developing bespoke database systems for Windows and the web. Porism’s esd-toolkit (developed in conjunction with I&DeA) publishes a list of some 600 customer facing services supplied by councils in England. It is now being adapted to the Scottish. Name: Scottish Government www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Government/local-government The Scottish Government is responsible for all local authorities. It allocates local authorities budget for a three year settlement at each Spending Review to provide more certainty and stability for local authorities as a result of knowing their individual revenue and capital allocations for three years. Name: Single Outcome Agreement www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Government/local-government/SOA www.improvementservice.org.uk/single-outcome-agreements/ Underpins the funding provided to local government over the period 2008-09 to 2010-2011. A central element of the new relationship was the ending of ring fencing of local government funding and the creation of a Single Outcome Agreement. They are agreements between the Scottish Government and CPPs which set out how each will work in the future towards improving outcomes for the local people in a way that reflects local circumstances and priorities, within the context of the Government’s 15 National Outcomes and Purpose.
  7. 7. Name: Building a Better Scotlandwww.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2004/11/20318/47372Agenda setting document - in 2004. Written under previous government, butsome work under this agenda continues. Name: Local Government in Scotland Act and Community Planning Partnershipswww.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Government/PublicServiceReform/community-planningThe Local Government in Scotland Act 2003 contained a package of measuresintended to support local determination and to deliver better, more responsive,public services. The three core elements are interlinked, Best Value, CommunityPlanning and the Power to Advance Wellbeing.Community Planning is intended to provide “trust within a framework”,empowering and charging local Government, core partners and ScottishMinisters to take ownership and drive forward improvement in local services.CPPs are intended to impact on the complex long standing issues that face someareas, for example poverty and health inequalities. Reporting on CommunityPlanning is to communities rather than to the Scottish Government. Name: Best Valuewww.improvementservice.org.ukSet up in 2005 help improve the efficiency, quality and accountability of localpublic services in Scotland by providing advice, consultancy and programmesupport to councils and their partners. Their purpose is to help councils andtheir partners to improve the health, quality of life and opportunities of allpeople in Scotland through community leadership, strong local governance andthe delivery of high quality, efficient local services. Name: Improvement Servicewww.improvementservice.org.ukSet up in 2005 help improve the efficiency, quality and accountability of localpublic services in Scotland by providing advice, consultancy and programmesupport to councils and their partners. Their purpose is to help councils andtheir partners to improve the health, quality of life and opportunities of all peoplein Scotland through community leadership, strong local governance and thedelivery of high quality, efficient local services.
  8. 8. Name: IS Shared Serviceswww.improvementservice.org.uk/shared-servicesThe Improvement Service works with the Local Government National SharedServices Board, councils and other partners on developing shared servicesstrategy and delivering specific collaborative projects.Nine current areas of work: Development strategy, Pension Pathfinder, PublicInformation Notices portal, Customer first, Improving together, Diagnosticpathway, Shared workforce planning, Revenues and benefits. Name: National Infrastructurewww.improvementservice.org.uk/national-infrastructure/The National ICT Infrastructure supports joined up/shared services acrossScottish local government as well as the wider public sector. Name: Customer Firstwww.improvementservice.org.uk/customer-first/It aims to deliver ‘first time’ public services by re-designing them aroundcustomers’ needs.The programme supports the principles of: easier to access, better integrated,local services; effective collaboration across the public sector; better use ofpublic resources; high standards of public service; and willingness to innovateand learn from others. Name: CRMwww.improvementservice.org.uk/national-crmNational CRM: Customer Relationship support. Name: Entitlement Cardswww.improvementservice.org.uk/national-entitlement-cardOneScotland Card Management System replaces the interim system that wasput in place to support the national concessionary fare scheme. As well assupporting concessionary travel, the new system will allow commercial travelticketing and other applications, and will allow councils to add products andservices to cards that have already been issued.
  9. 9. Name: DNA-Scotlandwww.improvementservice.org.uk/core-programmes/customer-first/dna-scotlandDefinitive National Addressing for Scotland: The DNA-Scotland Programmeaims to establish a single property information source that adheres to commonagreed standards and, together with the citizens account, will be used toimprove service delivery within Councils and throughout the Scottish publicsector. Corporate Address Gazetteers (CAGs) created by Councils will be linkedto a national address gazetteer – the One Scotland Gazetteer. Name: Esd-toolkit – Scotlandwww.esd.org.uk/esdtoolkit/Communities/A-ZScotland/ContentView.aspx?ContentType=Content-236Community of practice developing Scottish Navigation List and Scottish Services List. Name: A-Z/ Knowledgewww.improvementservice.org.uk/national-entitlement-cardOneScotland Card Management System replaces the interim system that wasput in place to support the national concessionary fare scheme. As well assupporting concessionary travel, the new system will allow commercial travelticketing and other applications, and will allow councils to add products andservices to cards that have already been issued. Name: Scottish Enterprisewww.scottish-enterprise.comScotland’s main economic, enterprise, innovation and investment agency. theultimate goal is to stimulate sustainable growth of Scotland’s economy bysupporting ambitious and innovative businesses. Works with public and privatesector partners to develop the business environment in Scotland. Deliversa range of dedicated support services locally, nationally and internationally.Relevant to Edniburgh:* Edinburgh Science Triangle is ranked in the world’s top twenty science parks.* Edinburgh BioQuarter is a landmark life science real estate development whichwill establish Edinburgh and Scotland as one of the world’s top ten centres forbiomedical commercialisation.
  10. 10. Name: COSLAwww.cosla.gov.ukScottish Local Authorities: The representative voice of Scottish local government.Also acts as the employers’ association on behalf of all Scottish councils. Asa membership organisation, one of our highest priorities is to maintain andenhance our relationship with member Councils and the key principles Name: SOLACEwww.solacescotland.org.ukLA Chief Executives: Scottish Branch of the Society of Local Authority ChiefExecutives & Senior Managers. Founded in 1973, it is the representative bodyfor senior strategic managers working in local government. Name: Edinburgh Partnershipwww.edinburgh.gov.uk/internet/Council/Partnerships/Community_planning/edinburghpartnershipwww.edinburgh.gov.uk/CEC/Corporate_Services/CommunityPlanningHomeLeads joint action to address key issues facing people living and working in thecity. The Community Plan for Edinburgh 2008 - 2011 sets out the priorities forthe Partnership:– sustainable economic growth– maximisation of land use and affordable housing– investment in prevention and care services, health improvement and social inclusion– environmental sustainability and climate change.
  11. 11. Name: City of Edinburgh Council (CEC)www.edinburgh.gov.ukCity of Edinburgh Council: Smart Cities partner.CEC has powers over most matters of local administration such as housing,planning, local transport, parks, economic development and regeneration. Name: CEC Plan 2007-2011www.edinburgh.gov.uk/internet/council/council_publications/CEC_corporate_plan__edinburgh_2007The Council’s Corporate Plan, covering the period 2007-11, was agreed by theCity of Edinburgh Council in August 2007. The plan shows how the Council istackling the strategic issues that matter to the public, improving performanceand working with partners to improve services. The plan outlines priorities forthe next four years, identifies what the Council will be doing to contribute toEdinburgh’s City Vision, and provides strategic direction for the Council and allthose working within the organisation. Name: BT Public Sector Scotlandwww.btplc.com/Thegroup/BTUKandWorldwide/BTRegions/Scotland/Factsandfigures/BTGlobalServices/DevolvedGovernment.htmThe City of Edinburgh Council partnership programme was created in 2001when a ten-year ICT partnership agreement was signed. It is focused onachieving the Council’s vision of being recognised as the UK leader in deliveringmodern, joined up and interactive public services using new technology. In early2006 a five year contract extension was agreed.
  12. 12. www.smartcities.info www.epractice.eu/community/smartcitiesThe Smart Cities project is creating an innovation network between cities and academicpartners to develop and deliver better e-services to citizens and businesses in the NorthSea Region. Smart Cities is funded by the Interreg IVB North Sea Region Programme of theEuropean Union.Smart Cities is PARTLY funded by the Interreg IVB North Sea Region Programme of theEuropean Union. The North Sea Region Programme 2007-2013 works with regionaldevelopment projects around the North Sea. Promoting transnational cooperation, theProgramme aims to make the region a better place to live, work and invest in. 9 781907 576157

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