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All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)
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All Hands on Deck - Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum (AAM 2011 Houston)

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It’s the age of participatory engagement, and the crowd is making vital contributions in areas where only experts used to tread. How can museums harness their visitors’ collective skills and …

It’s the age of participatory engagement, and the crowd is making vital contributions in areas where only experts used to tread. How can museums harness their visitors’ collective skills and intelligence, not just to make exhibits and programs more engaging but also to help carry out the museum’s scientific, historical, aesthetic, or environmental work? In this panel, we looked at how three science-themed institutions are approaching this new frontier and what the future holds in three state-of-the-art facilities now on the drawing boards: a new learning space at the National Museum of Natural History; a redesigned visitor center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida; and the new Nature Research Center at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. In the q&a, we debated the whys and hows of bringing citizen science inside the museum and inviting visitors to lend their hands, eyes, and minds to the cause.

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  • More than 23,000 submissionsMore than 14 million views on YouTube
  • More than 23,000 submissionsMore than 14 million views on YouTube
  • Over 275,000 volunteers so far50 million classifications in the first year!Zooniverse – a clearinghouse site for Citizen Science project, maintained by the Citizen Science Alliance (of which the Adler Planetarium is a key member).
  • An online game where you solve the puzzle of how to fold an RNA molecule.“Each week the best designs created by game players (and chosen by the gaming community will be synthesized at Stanford” !!! This isn’t just online, it moves from online right into the lab!
  • An online game where you solve the puzzle of how to fold an RNA molecule.“Each week the best designs created by game players (and chosen by the gaming community will be synthesized at Stanford” !!! This isn’t just online, it moves from online right into the lab!
  • Authority was like mainframe computers:centralized in a few big organizations, hard to access, distant and really designed more for expertsToday it’s like distributed supercomputing:decentralized, democratized, ubiquitous, near at hand, and designed for all of us.
  • As the most-visited natural history museum in the world, we welcome 7 million visitors to our location in Washington, DC, and another 30 million visit us online. We are caretakers of the largest natural history collection in the world, with more than 126 million objects. 200 research scientists work in the museum, in 7 departments.We are fortunate to have over 600 volunteers who serve the public, and 500 volunteers who work behind-the-scenes with our scientists and collections professionals.Our scale and status as a national museum positions us to reach out to citizens to participate in our science.
  • In 2010, we engaged Slover-Linett to conduct a study on museum audiences which captured what they are looking for:Audience NeedInterest in “real” experiences Relevance, customizationImmersion, dynamic contentOne-of-a-kind experienceSense of wonderNMNH NeedPublic outreach mandate for science staff Digitization for collection accessBroader data collection
  • Cristián Samper, Director of the Natural History Museum, inspired us to “seize the moment,” by stating that:“Science has taken us very far, very fast. But in some disciplines, we’re at a point where the big questions simply can’t be answered by the scientists alone. We need more minds, more hands on deck. It’s not just a question of good ‘public science.’ It’s a question of good science. We need to involve the public in the process of science and make it theirs.”
  • Our 10,000 square foot Education Center will be located on the ground floor near the wheelchair-accessible entrance to the Museum on Constitution Avenue.The space will have an auditorium, open collections, flexible work stations, technology, tools, and staff to involve the public in our science.
  • We need:-A platform or space that is flexible enough to accommodate a variety of activities-An infrastructure so we can manage “all hands on deck” and staff-Buy-in from scientists and collections professionals, and their input and continued participation-Projects that: address scientists’ needs, are meaningful to visitors, and allow for various levels of participation.
  • LeafSnap: The Smithsonian worked with Columbia University and the University of Maryland on visual recognition software to help identify species from photographs. Leafsnap is the first in a series of electronic field guides being developed to demonstrate this new technology. This free mobile app helps identify tree species from photographs of their leaves and contains beautiful high-resolution images of their flowers, fruit, seeds, and bark. Leafsnap currently includes the trees of New York City and Washington, D.C., and will soon grow to cover the trees of the entire continental United States.Leafsnap turns users into citizen scientists, automatically sharing images, species identifications, and geo-coded stamps of species locations with a community of scientists who will use the stream of data to map and monitor the ebb and flow of flora nationwide.The Leafsnap family of electronic field guides aims to leverage digital applications and mobile devices to build an ever-greater awareness of and appreciation for biodiversity.“Citizen scientists” can assist in other museum projects, such as:-pinning beetle specimens for the Entomology Department,-digitizing objects (taking photos and scanning),-entering text from paper cards -- recording basic information like color and size,-checking the work of others (so each object is checked at least 5 times, increasing the chance that it’s correct), and-inventorying natural life around the museum, or in their own backyards, using mobile devices – information can be used to create a virtual map that documents change over time.-participating in the “biocube” project – where a one-foot-square metal cube is placed it in a range of ecosystems-land and water, tropical and temperate, freshwater and marine. Participants will observe, identify, and photograph creatures that pass through the cube. A recent biocube sample in a coral reef of Moorea yielded over 600 species of plants and animals in its cubic foot.
  • Delineating what is ‘real science’ and what is ‘like real science’ – educators and scientists need to communicate how science is done.Easy entry instructions: there is a need for very clear instructions and often staff to answer questions; or very robust digital interfaces that walk people through a process.Possible high failure rate: but this might be mitigated by including visitors in the vetting process so each visitor decision is checked by 10 others.
  • Last month, a team of Smithsonian scientists conducting a fish survey in Guyana ran into a problem. After collecting 5,000 fish specimens from the river, the ichthyologists had to identify them all in less than a week in order to obtain a permit to export the specimens back to the United States. Only, they had no idea how they could complete this task in time. They decided to post photographs of the fish on Facebook and ask their friends to help them identify the species.The response was overwhelming and within 24 hours, 90 percent of the specimens had been identified. By quickly tapping the collective expertise of their social network to help with the preliminary identification process, the expedition members were able to sort, pack and export the specimens to Washington, D.C. in a timely manner. The Facebook identifications also will speed the cataloging process and help make the material available for loan and study as quickly as possible.
  • Even as most of the news about NASA focuses on the end of the 30 year shuttle program, NASA continues to explore the bounds of science and technology with breakthrough projects. But they haven’t always told their own story very well.NASA recognized the need to create a two-way line of communication.Created PE
  • More engaging one way communicationLower levels examples are really PR…engaging, fun, a way for many people to get involved…communicate with ISS astronauts, access images of earthExamples…even visitor centers like KSCVC
  • Zero-RoboticsA robotics programming competition that opens the world-class research facilities on the International Space Station (ISS) to high-school students. Students actually write programs at their High School that controls a satellite in space.Extend the benefits of space research on the ISS to high school studentsExpands the scope of activities available on the ISS National LabHigh school students build critical engineering skills, such as problem solving, design thought process, operations training, teamwork and presentation skills. Participants:High school students, Grades 9-12 (opportunities for Middle School Students have also been done)Teachers and subject matter experts will assist the studentsBased on selection of 24 teams of 20 students each, will reach 480 students directly with future opportunities planned to scale to Nation-wide opportunityApproach to Engagement:Call for participants; Selected the top 24 applicants based on a competitive proposal
  • Desert RatsNASA tests prototype vehicles in the Arizona desert,Public can visitOn-line opportunities to chose exploration areas, etc.
  • Moon Zoo – http://www.moonzoo.org/Elicit public participation in detailed lunar crater counting to the widest extent possible given image data from LRO to improve understanding of the MoonLeverage a multitude of human eyes to the discover unusual visual features on the lunar surfaceOffer opportunities for the public to engage in real exploration, discovery, and scienceParticipants:Global general public, all ages, no restrictions>14,000 classifiers since launchApproach to Engagement:The “Zooniverse” community involves ~320,000 people registered and interested in helping to classify space images for science. Moon Zoo draws from this community.Conversation is created via a blog, forum, and social media; challenges are issued (Moonometer)
  • Moon Zoo – http://www.moonzoo.org/Elicit public participation in detailed lunar crater counting to the widest extent possible given image data from LRO to improve understanding of the MoonLeverage a multitude of human eyes to the discover unusual visual features on the lunar surfaceOffer opportunities for the public to engage in real exploration, discovery, and scienceParticipants:Global general public, all ages, no restrictions>14,000 classifiers since launchApproach to Engagement:The “Zooniverse” community involves ~320,000 people registered and interested in helping to classify space images for science. Moon Zoo draws from this community.Conversation is created via a blog, forum, and social media; challenges are issued (Moonometer)
  • Public Participation in Science Data Analysis Projects:Stardust@homeA citizen science project that encourages volunteers to search images for tiny interstellar dust impactParticipants have access to the web-based "virtual microscope" which allows them to search each field for interstellar dust impacts by focusing up and down with a focus control.As an incentive for volunteers, Stardust@home will allow the first individual to discover a particular interstellar dust particle to name it. Also, the discoverer will appear as a co-author on any scientific paper announcing the discovery of the particle.Uses the power of large numbers of people at low cost (projects amass more data than professional researchers can review alone; humans can discern patterns in data with accuracy superior that of any computer algorithm).Give interested public the opportunity to contribute meaningfully to NASA research projects.Participants:General public – anyone interested is welcome to participate.Stardust@home: 27,000 people registered; 71 million images viewedApproach to Engagement:Projects are available to the public through the InternetThe Planetary Society assists Stardust@home with publicity/outreach
  • Science and exploration effort to explain the origin of freshwater microbialites . Earliest remnants of life on ancient Earth,.. ~2.5 billion to 540 million years ago. Today, microbialites are found in environments where conditions are often too harsh for most organisms. The microbialites of Pavilion Lake are relevant to our understanding of ancient microbialites that were once common and diverse on early Earth.Pavilion Lake has become an for the search for life in our solar system and beyond.
  • NASA Tournament LabUtilizes the principles of distributed innovation to allow participants worldwide to contribute to solving internal NASA technical challenges by developing innovative computational algorithms. NTL is an online virtual facility for NASA researchers with a computational or complex data processing challenge to post ideas for potential algorithmic or software development challenges. These ideas can then be discussed, refined, and voted upon by peers.Chosen problems will be converted into problem statements and run as competitions within the TopCoder community.    Software developers, algorithmists, and mathematicians will compete with each other to create a winning solution as measured by internal code quality, performance against benchmarks, and the ability to be integrated into NASA systemsParticipants earn prize money, prestige, and reputationParticipants:Open to anyone but with strong participation by Masters, Doctoral, and Post-Doc studentsTwo prominent researchers in Crowd sourcing theory from Harvard and London Business SchoolOver two-hundred thousand coders worldwide who participate in TopCoder ® tournament challenges (439 participated in a limited NASA study in 2009 in a single tournament)Approach to Engagement:TopCoder challenge initiated at October 2010 TopCoder® OpenFuture years activities in negotiation
  • Future of EngagementThrough a 10 year master plan, enhance current experience by building new hands-on/minds-on exhibits which include more interactivity and use state of the art technologies to develop totally immersive environments. Concepts include:Continue to enhance the highly energetic "Exploration Space" exhibit as a major platform for launching and testing Participatory Exploration initiatives such as opportunities to remotely operate real hardware being tested in the field. Existing exhibit elements that support the spirit of PE include a live show that excites guests about the future of exploration inviting them to get engaged and social media connections to keep guests involved after their visit. “Legacy” interactive museum including an opportunity to travel through NASA’s history as you soar through time and space in a 4D motion theatre;Get nose to nose with a flown space shuttle orbiter in the “Prodigy Center”, interact with retired KSC workers who cared for and processed this unique vehicle for each of its historic missions. Learn about the humankinds most complex engineering endeavor – the construction of the International Space Station and many other amazing accomplishments of the space shuttle program;Participate in hands on opportunities to get involved with exploration at “NASA Next” including:Work together to build and test your ideas with robotics;Team up with scientists to witness dramatic rocket engine tests;Maneuver robotic arms to handle lunar samples;Watch robots compete in the test arena;Work in real-time with NASA Scientists to map other planets.
  • PE is a great way to deliver authenticity…visitors contributing in real ways
  • The KENNEDY SPACE CENTER MASTER PLAN seeks to integrate PE into the Visitor ExperienceAreas in NASA NEXT, and the ORBITER HOME, for instance, offer visitors the opportunity to help NASA by sharing ideas and participating in research projects.
  • Transcript

    • 1. All Hands on Deck<br />Getting Visitors Involved in the Work of the Museum<br />AAM Annual MeetingMay 25, 2011<br />Peter LinettSlover Linett Strategies Inc.Chicago, IL<br />Margaret Lowman, PhDNature Research CenterNorth Carolina Museum of Natural SciencesRaleigh, NC<br />Tom OwenPGAV DestinationsSt. Louis, MO<br />Shari WerbNational Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, DC<br />
    • 2. citizen journalism<br />crowdsourcing<br />the pro-am revolution<br />maker culture<br />collective intelligence<br />participatory design<br />citizen science<br />social practice art<br />user-generated content<br />
    • 3.
    • 4. ?<br />authority<br />expertise<br />
    • 5. ?<br />authors<br />experts<br />
    • 6. What role do<br />you<br />play?<br />
    • 7.
    • 8.
    • 9.
    • 10.
    • 11.
    • 12.
    • 13. photo of Wish Tree and/or the Tunisian collective painting<br />
    • 14.
    • 15.
    • 16.
    • 17.
    • 18.
    • 19.
    • 20.
    • 21. “<br />Imagine a world where participating in science is as accepted a part of everyday life as participation in a sport is today.<br />Many people would participate in science at various levels, each making genuine contributions to scientific knowledge.How much more knowledge could we discover?How many more people could learn about the way that science works and make scientific habits of mind a part of their everyday lives?<br />”<br />M. Jordan Raddick et al. 2009 “Citizen Science: Status and Research Directions for the Coming Decade” <br />
    • 22. decentralized<br />collaborative<br />democratic<br />co-creator<br />expressor<br />amateur<br />expertise/authority<br />centralized<br />isolated<br />elite<br />your role<br />consumer<br />beholder<br />layman<br />
    • 23.
    • 24. Preparing for“All Hands on Deck”with a New Education Center<br />
    • 25. Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH)<br />Our Scale<br />Scale<br />Serve 7 million visitors annually<br />30 million online<br />200 Research Scientists<br />126 Million Objects<br />Current Volunteer Participation<br /><ul><li>600+ Public Serving Volunteers (scientists &amp; non-scientists)
    • 26. 500+ Behind-the-Scenes Volunteers (scientists &amp; non-scientists)</li></li></ul><li>Slover-Linett Study: Audience Needs &amp; Museum Needs<br />Audience Need<br />Interest in “real” experiences <br />Relevance, customization<br />Immersion, dynamic content<br />One-of-a-kind experience<br />Sense of wonder<br />NMNH Need<br />Public outreach mandate for science staff <br />Digitization for collection access<br />Broader data collection<br />
    • 27. “This is the moment, and we need to seize it.”<br />“Science has taken us very far, very fast. But in some disciplines, we’re at a point where the big questions simply can’t be answered by the scientists alone. We need more minds, more hands on deck. It’s not just a question of good ‘public science.’ It’s a question of good science. We need to involve the public in the process of science and make it theirs.”<br /> NMNH Director, Dr. Cristián Samper<br />
    • 28. How can we involve the public in science and make it theirs?<br />What we’re doing:<br />Building a 10,000 square foot Education Center that will have space, open collections, technology, tools, and staff to involve the public in our science<br />
    • 29. How can we involve the public in science and make it theirs?<br />What we need:<br /><ul><li>A “platform” or space
    • 30. A way to manage “all hands on deck”
    • 31. Buy-in from scientists and collections professionals
    • 32. Projects that:</li></ul> - address scientists’ needs,<br /> - are meaningful to visitors, and<br /> - allow for various levels of participation<br />
    • 33. Potential Projects for Education Center<br />LeafSnap for mapping invasive species in the area<br />Pinning beetles<br />Digitizing objects<br />“Biocube” project<br />
    • 34. Challenges<br />Delineating what is ‘real science’ and what is ‘like real science’<br />Easy entry instructions<br />Possible high failure rate<br />
    • 35. When It Has Worked<br />It solves a problem for a scientist<br />Facebook friends help scientists quickly identify nearly 5,000 fish specimens collected in Guyana <br />A fish identified as Hypostomus taphorni, from the Guyana expedition. <br />A fish identified as Guianacara cuyunii from the Guyana expedition.<br />
    • 36. Participatory Exploration<br />Presenter: Tom Owen, PGAV<br />Date: 2011.05.25<br />
    • 37. 34<br />PARTICIPATORY EXPLORATION<br />Public<br />PE is defined as “the active involvement of individuals as contributors to and collaborators in NASA’s research, science, and exploration activities…It encourages individuals to contribute their creativity and capabilities to NASA’s mission of discovery and invites them to share in the excitement of building our future.”  <br />
    • 38. Levels of Participation<br />35<br />NASA Tournament Lab<br />Fragile Oasis<br />SPHERES<br />NASA’sPE Goal Area <br />CubeSats <br /> Eyes on the Solar System<br />Required Experience <br />NASA Flickr<br />Stardust@home<br />NASA YouTube<br />Astronauts on Twitter <br />NASA Tweetups<br />HiWish<br />Zooniverse/ MoonZoo<br />Mission Web Streaming<br />NASA on Twitter <br />EarthKam<br />NASA Facebook<br />Wake up songs<br />KSCVC<br />Dissemination<br />(traditional one way engagement) <br />Contribution<br />Level 3 <br />Connect<br />Level 1 <br />Collaboration<br />Level 4<br />Experience<br />Level 2 <br />Increasing Intensity of Participation<br />
    • 39. Collaborate <br />Zero-Robotics<br /> A robotics programming competition that opens the world-class research facilities on the International Space Station (ISS) to high-school students. Students actually write programs at their High School that controls a satellite in space.<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G30rTRUYkd8<br />Watch the SPHERES perform on the ISS<br />
    • 40. 37<br />
    • 41. Collaborate<br />Moon Zoo – http://www.moonzoo.org/Elicit public participation in detailed lunar crater counting to the widest extent possible given image data from LRO to improve understanding of the Moon<br />Leverage a multitude of human eyes to the discover unusual visual features on the lunar surface<br />Offer opportunities for the public to engage in real exploration, discovery, and science<br />
    • 42. Collaborate<br />Be a MartianNASA needs lots of help sorting through the hundreds of thousands of images they’ve collected from the surface of Mars. <br />Be A Martian combines the work of analyzing those images online with the competition of gaming. In this way, NASA hopes to enlist citizens to help with the huge project.<br />“We really need the next generation of explorers,” says Michelle Viotti, from the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which oversees Mars missions.“And we’re also accomplishing something important for Nasa. There’s so much data coming back from Mars. Having a wider crowd look at the data, classify it and help understand its meaning is very important.”<br />
    • 43. Colloborate – Level 4 <br />Public Participation in Science Data Analysis Projects:Stardust@home<br />A citizen science project that encourages volunteers to search images for tiny interstellar dust impact<br />Participants have access to the web-based &quot;virtual microscope”<br />
    • 44. Collaborate <br />41<br />Pavilion Lake Research Project: British Columbia, Canada<br /><ul><li>An analog for space exploration </li></li></ul><li>Collaborate <br />NASA Tournament Lab is an online virtual facility for NASA researchers with a computational or complex data processing challenge to post ideas for potential algorithmic or software development challenges. <br />
    • 45. Museum for Shuttle Atlantis<br />43<br />
    • 46. AUTHENTICALLY ABOUT THE PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE.<br />Authentically American.<br />Authentically heroic.<br />Authentically historic.<br />Authentic science.<br />Authentic astronauts.<br />Authentic hardware.<br />Key Brand attribute for KSCVC<br />44<br />
    • 47. 10-Year Master Plan for Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex<br />45<br />45<br />5/31/2011<br />
    • 48. 46<br />KSCVC …<br /> A PORTAL for Participatory Exploration projects, allowing many visitors their first exposure to the concept. Visitors can do more at home.<br />Help analyze imagery in the Orbiter Home<br />A TOOLBOX where visitors can make observations or explore ideas and communicate with experts<br /> using tools and facilities that they can’t access anywhere else.<br />Talk with the experts in the ISS Science Lab<br />An INCUBATOR where people can meet and work together, even very briefly, and generate new ideas that may change our future.<br />Explore your ideas in NASA Next<br />
    • 49. KSCVC …<br />Visitors participate in a “clickworkers” activity<br />
    • 50. Astronaut Encounter Theatre<br />Live interpretation will direct visitors to PE opportunities<br />48<br />
    • 51. Nature Research Center (www.naturesearch.org)<br />
    • 52. www.canopymeg.com<br />
    • 53. Citizen science<br />
    • 54. 1. Cutting-edge science and education outreach to the public<br />
    • 55. 2. Diversity in science androle models for youth<br />
    • 56. 3. No child left indoors……<br />
    • 57.
    • 58. Museum - What We Know<br />
    • 59.
    • 60.
    • 61.
    • 62.
    • 63.
    • 64.
    • 65. NRC – how we know what we know<br />
    • 66.
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    • 71.
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    • 79.
    • 80.
    • 81. Our children &amp; their children are counting on us…..<br />
    • 82. NRC – science that affects our daily lives… “how we know what we know”<br />
    • 83. Let’s talk.<br />What’s it going to look like in 10 years?<br />What will be the benefits<br />to people?<br /> to museums?<br /> to science?<br />What’s standing in the way?<br />

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