Microsoft ®  Office  Training Get up to speed with the  2007 system
<ul><li>Overview: A new look to familiar programs </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system When you open a 20...
<ul><li>The new Office: Made for you </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Yes, there’s a lot of change to...
<ul><li>What’s on the Ribbon?  </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system The three parts of the Ribbon are  ta...
<ul><li>What’s on the Ribbon?  </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system How do you get started? In Word 2007,...
<ul><li>How commands are organized </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Commands are organized by how the...
<ul><li>More commands, but only when you need them </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Commands you use ...
<ul><li>More options if you need them </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Sometimes an arrow, called the...
<ul><li>Preview before you select </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Are you familiar with the try-undo...
<ul><li>Put commands on your own toolbar </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Do you often use commands t...
<ul><li>Working with different screen resolutions  </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Everything descri...
<ul><li>Working with different screen resolutions  </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Everything descri...
<ul><li>Answers to critical questions </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Now it’s time to look beyond t...
<ul><li>What happened to the File menu? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system The Microsoft  Office Button...
<ul><li>What happened to the File menu? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system The  Microsoft Office Button...
<ul><li>Where do I start a blank document? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system When you create a new doc...
<ul><li>What about favorite keyboard shortcuts?  </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system If you rely on the ...
<ul><li>What about favorite keyboard shortcuts?  </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system The new shortcuts a...
<ul><li>What about favorite keyboard shortcuts?  </li></ul><ul><li>Keyboard shortcuts of old that begin with CTRL are stil...
<ul><li>[Author: .swf gets inserted here; delete this placeholder before inserting .swf file.] </li></ul><ul><li>What if I...
<ul><li>What about the new file formats? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Word 2007, Excel 2007, and ...
<ul><li>What about the new file formats?  </li></ul><ul><li>For documents, workbooks, and presentations, the default file ...
<ul><li>Working with files from earlier versions </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system You may be the firs...
<ul><li>Working with files from earlier versions  </li></ul><ul><li>You can open a file created in previous versions of Of...
<ul><li>Working with files from earlier versions  </li></ul><ul><li>Colleagues who have Word, Excel, or PowerPoint version...
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Office2007

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This presentation is provided for training purposes courtesy of Microsoft Office Online.

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  • [ Notes to trainer : For detailed help in customizing this template, see the very last slide. Also, look for additional lesson text in the notes pane of some slides. Adobe Flash animations : This template contains Flash animations. These will play in PowerPoint 2000 and later. However: If you want to save this template in PowerPoint 2007, save it in the earlier PowerPoint file format: PowerPoint 97-2003 Presentation (*.ppt) or PowerPoint 97-2003 Template (*.pot) (you’ll see the file types in the Save As dialog box, next to Save as type) . Warning: If you save it in a PowerPoint 2007 file format, such as PowerPoint Presentation (*.pptx) or PowerPoint Template (*.potx) , the animations won’t be retained in the saved file. Also : Because this presentation contains Flash animations, saving the template may cause a warning message to appear regarding personal information. Unless you add information to the properties of the Flash file itself, this warning does not apply to this presentation. Click OK on the message.]
  • Notes: Microsoft Office programs described in this training presentation include Microsoft Office Word 2007, Office Excel ® 2007, Office PowerPoint ® 2007, Office Access 2007, and Office Outlook ® 2007. The Ribbon was developed in response to what Office users—possibly you—have asked for: programs that are simpler to use, with commands that are easier to find. The Ribbon may be new, but with a little time and exposure you’ll find that it works for you, not against you.
  • Instead of having 30 or so undisplayed toolbars, and commands buried on menus or in dialog boxes, you now have one control center that brings the essentials together and makes them very visual. And once you learn how to use the Ribbon in one program (the picture here shows Word 2007), you’ll find it easy to use in other programs too.
  • You’ll find the same organization in other 2007 Office system programs, with the first tab including commands for the most key type of work. The primary tab in Excel, PowerPoint, and Access is also the Home tab. In Outlook, when you create a message, it’s the Message tab.
  • Take the Paste command, for example. It’s one of the most frequently used commands. Why not give it maximum exposure in the window, along with its related commands, Cut and Copy ? In Word and Excel, these commands all appear on the Home tab. Less frequently used commands are less prominent on the Ribbon. For example, most people use Paste Special less often than they use Paste . So to access Paste Special , you first click the arrow on Paste .
  • If you don’t have a picture in your Word document, the commands to work with a picture aren’t necessary. But after you insert a picture in Word, the Picture Tools appear along with the Format tab that contains the commands you need to work with the picture. When you’re through working with the picture, Picture Tools go away. If you want to work on the picture again, just click it, and the tab appears again with all the commands you need.
  • In PowerPoint, the example described here, the Font group on the Home tab contains all the commands that are used the most to make font changes: commands to change the font face and font size, and to make the font bold, italic, or underlined. Clicking the Dialog Box Launcher gets you to all the other, less commonly used options such as superscript.
  • Try-undo-try. You select a font, font color, or style, or make changes to a picture. But the option you select turns out not to be what you want, so you undo and try again, and perhaps again, until you finally get what you have in mind. To use live preview, rest the mouse pointer on an option. Your document changes to show you what that option would look like, before you actually make a selection. After you see the preview of what you want, then you click the option to make your selection. Click Play to watch the process of seeing how different underline styles will look before selecting one. [ Note to trainer: To play the animation when viewing the slide show, right-click the animation, and then click Play . After playing the file once, you may have to click Rewind (after right-clicking) and then click Play . If you have problems viewing the animation, see the notes for the last slide in this presentation about playing an Adobe Flash animation. If you still have problems viewing the animation, the slide that follows this one is a duplicate slide with static art. Delete either the current slide or the next slide before showing the presentation.]
  • For example, if you use Track Changes in Word or Excel every day to turn on revision marks, and you don’t want to have to click the Review tab to access that command each time, you can add Track Changes to the Quick Access Toolbar. To do that, right-click Track Changes on the Review tab, and then click Add to Quick Access Toolbar . To delete a button, right-click it, and then click Remove from Quick Access Toolbar . Click Play to see both these processes in action. [ Note to trainer: To play the animation when viewing the slide show, right-click the animation, and then click Play . After playing the file once, you may have to click Rewind (after right-clicking) and then click Play . If you have problems viewing the animation, see the notes for the last slide in this presentation about playing an Adobe Flash animation. If you still have problems viewing the animation, the slide that follows this one is a duplicate slide with static art. Delete either the current slide or the next slide before showing the presentation.]
  • More on low resolution: For example, in Word, with a higher resolution you will see all the commands in the Show/Hide group on the View tab. But with 800 by 600 resolution, you will see the Show/Hide button only, not the commands in the group. In that case, you click the arrow on the Show/Hide button to display the commands in the group. Generally, the groups that display only the group name at a lower resolution are those with less frequently used commands.
  • More on smaller windows: At any resolution, there is a window size at which some groups will display only the group name. So if you’re working in a program window that isn’t maximized, you may need to click the arrow on the group button to display the commands. More on Tablet PCs : If you have a Tablet PC with a larger monitor, the Ribbon adjusts to show you larger versions of the tabs and groups.
  • The Microsoft Office Button takes the place of the File menu in several Office programs. It provides more options, more conveniently located together. In this lesson you’ll also find out what to do if you can’t find a command you need, see how to work with the new file formats, and find out how people who haven’t upgraded to Word, Excel, or PowerPoint 2007 can open your files and work in them as usual.
  • For example, you’ve got support here for checking that files in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint don’t contain private information or comments.
  • Having program options available through the Microsoft Office Button makes them more visible and conveniently close at hand when you start work on old files or new ones. Click Excel Options , Word Options , and so on, at the bottom of the menu, and then click any of the categories in the list that appears on the left. For example, in Excel, click Formulas to turn the R1C1 reference style on or off. In Word, click Proofing to turn on or off the feature to check spelling as you type.
  • To get to the new window, start by clicking the Microsoft Office Button in the upper-left corner of the window. Then click New to open the New Document window in Word, the New Workbook window in Excel, the New Presentation window in PowerPoint, or the Getting Started with Microsoft Office Access window in Access. The picture shows the New Presentation window in PowerPoint.
  • More on using the new shortcuts When you press ALT, you’ll see Key Tips for all the Ribbon tabs, all commands on the tabs, the Quick Access Toolbar, and the Microsoft Office Button . Press the key for the tab you want to display. This makes all the Key Tip badges for that tab’s buttons appear. Then, press the key for the button you want.
  • To learn more about keyboard shortcuts, see the Quick Reference Card, linked to at the end of this presentation.
  • The animation shows how to use the interactive guide: You point to a command in the Office 2003 program to see where it is in the new program. For example, to find the Insert Table command in Word, in the guide you would rest the pointer on the Insert command in Word 2003. Click to see an animation of the location of the command in Word 2007. (It’s on the Insert tab in the Tables group). In addition to giving you immediate help, the guides serve as a learning tool that will help you get familiar with the location of particular commands. You’ll find the links to these guides in the Quick Reference Card at the end of the course. [ Note to trainer: To play the animation when viewing the slide show, right-click the animation, and then click Play . After playing the file once, you may have to click Rewind (after right-clicking) and then click Play . If you have problems viewing the animation, see the notes for the last slide in this presentation about playing an Adobe Flash animation. If you still have problems viewing the animation, the slide that follows this one is a duplicate slide with static art. Delete either the current slide or the next slide before showing the presentation.]
  • If the technical details interest you: The new file formats are based on XML (Extensible Markup Language) and embrace the Office Open XML Formats.
  • Note : There’s a new file format in Access, too, but it has some different characteristics. The presentation covers that in a bit.
  • Note: If you open a presentation created in PowerPoint 95, PowerPoint will default to the 2007 format when you save it. But you can choose to save the file in the 97-2003 format. If you want to save a file in the 2007 format, select Word Document , Excel Workbook , or PowerPoint Presentation in the Save as type box.
  • You can learn more about the new file format in individual courses about Word 2007, Excel 2007, and PowerPoint 2007. You’ll find pointers to these courses in the Quick Reference Card linked to at the end of this presentation.
  • Office2007

    1. 1. Microsoft ® Office Training Get up to speed with the 2007 system
    2. 2. <ul><li>Overview: A new look to familiar programs </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system When you open a 2007 Microsoft Office system program, you’ll see a lot that’s familiar. But you’ll also notice a new look at the top of the window. Menus and toolbars have been replaced by the Ribbon , which contains tabs that you click to get to commands. This presentation introduces you to the Ribbon and other new ways to make better documents, faster.
    3. 3. <ul><li>The new Office: Made for you </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Yes, there’s a lot of change to familiar Microsoft Office programs. But it’s good change. With the Ribbon, commands and other tools you need are now exposed and more readily available.
    4. 4. <ul><li>What’s on the Ribbon? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system The three parts of the Ribbon are tabs , groups , and commands . Tabs sit across the top of the Ribbon. Each one represents core tasks you do in a given program. Groups are sets of related commands. They remain on display and readily available, giving you rich visual aids. Commands are arranged in groups. A command can be a button, a menu, or a box where you enter information.
    5. 5. <ul><li>What’s on the Ribbon? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system How do you get started? In Word 2007, for example, that’s the Home tab. It’s got the commands that people use most commonly when they write documents: font formatting commands ( Font group), paragraph options ( Paragraph group), and text styles ( Styles group). Begin with the first tab.
    6. 6. <ul><li>How commands are organized </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Commands are organized by how they’re used. Frequently used core commands no longer have to share space with a range of remotely related commands on a menu or toolbar. They’re the ones that get used, and so now they’re the ones most prominently featured.
    7. 7. <ul><li>More commands, but only when you need them </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Commands you use most are available on the Ribbon all the time. Others appear only when you need them, in response to an action you take. For example, the Picture Tools in Word appear on the Ribbon when you insert a picture, and they go away when you’re done. The Ribbon responds to your action. So don’t worry if you don’t see all the commands at all times. Take the first steps, and what you need will appear.
    8. 8. <ul><li>More options if you need them </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Sometimes an arrow, called the Dialog Box Launcher , appears in the lower-right corner of a group. This means more options are available for the group. On the Home tab, click the arrow in the Font group. For example, to get to a less commonly used font option in PowerPoint ® 2007 : The Font dialog box opens, with the full selection of font commands.
    9. 9. <ul><li>Preview before you select </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Are you familiar with the try-undo-try cycle? You make a change, it’s not what you want, and so you undo and keep trying until you get what you had in mind. Now you can see a live preview of your choice before you make a selection, which saves you time and gives you better results. Animation: Right-click, and click Play .
    10. 10. <ul><li>Put commands on your own toolbar </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Do you often use commands that aren’t as quickly available as you’d like? You can easily add them to the Quick Access Toolbar . Located above the Ribbon when you first start your Microsoft Office program, the Quick Access Toolbar puts commands where they’re always visible and near at hand. Animation: Right-click, and click Play .
    11. 11. <ul><li>Working with different screen resolutions </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Everything described so far applies if your screen is set to high resolution and the program window is maximized. If not, things look different. <ul><li>Low resolution: If your screen is set to a low resolution, a few groups on the Ribbon will display the group name only, not the commands in the group. Click the arrow on the group button to display the commands. </li></ul>How? Like this:
    12. 12. <ul><li>Working with different screen resolutions </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Everything described so far applies if your screen is set to high resolution and the program window is maximized. If not, things look different. <ul><li>Screen not maximized: Some groups will display only the group names. </li></ul>How? Like this: <ul><li>Tablet PCs: On those with smaller screens, the Ribbon adjusts to show smaller versions of tabs and groups. </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>Answers to critical questions </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Now it’s time to look beyond the Ribbon and see what else is new. The Microsoft Office Button is new, as are new keyboard shortcuts and new file formats for Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access 2007. In this lesson, you’ll find out how to work with some of the new options.
    14. 14. <ul><li>What happened to the File menu? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system The Microsoft Office Button appears in the upper-left corner of the window in several Microsoft Office programs, such as Word and Excel. But the button offers more commands than the File menu did.
    15. 15. <ul><li>What happened to the File menu? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system The Microsoft Office Button also leads you to the program settings that control things like your preferences for correcting spelling. In previous versions of Office programs you could set options in the Options dialog box, which you opened through the Tools menu. Many of those options can now be found when you click the Microsoft Office Button .
    16. 16. <ul><li>Where do I start a blank document? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system When you create a new document, workbook, presentation, or database, you’ll get a full, colorful window to help you begin. You can start with a blank or existing file, as you’re accustomed to doing. Or to jump-start your authoring work, look on the left. Under Microsoft Office Online , click Featured , and choose from the catalog of links to online templates and training courses.
    17. 17. <ul><li>What about favorite keyboard shortcuts? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system If you rely on the keyboard more than the mouse, you’ll want to know that the Ribbon design comes with new shortcuts. <ul><li>There are shortcuts for every single button on the Ribbon. </li></ul><ul><li>Shortcuts often require fewer keys. </li></ul>This change brings two big advantages over previous versions of Office programs:
    18. 18. <ul><li>What about favorite keyboard shortcuts? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system The new shortcuts also have a new name: Key Tips . The picture shows an example of using Key Tips to remove a heading style in Word. Press ALT to make the Key Tips appear. Press H to select the Home tab. Press E to select the Clear Formatting button in the Font group to remove the heading style.
    19. 19. <ul><li>What about favorite keyboard shortcuts? </li></ul><ul><li>Keyboard shortcuts of old that begin with CTRL are still intact, and you can use them as you always have. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, the shortcut CTRL+C still copies something to the clipboard, and the shortcut CTRL+V still pastes something from the clipboard. </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system What about the old keyboard shortcuts?
    20. 20. <ul><li>[Author: .swf gets inserted here; delete this placeholder before inserting .swf file.] </li></ul><ul><li>What if I can’t find a command? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system If you can’t find the command you’re looking for, there’s help. For Word 2007, Excel 2007, and PowerPoint 2007, there’s a visual, interactive reference guide to help you quickly learn where things are. Animation: Right-click, and click Play .
    21. 21. <ul><li>What about the new file formats? </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Word 2007, Excel 2007, and PowerPoint 2007 use new file formats. <ul><li>Increased security for your files and reduced chances of file corruption. </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced file size. </li></ul><ul><li>New features. </li></ul>There are lots of great reasons for the change:
    22. 22. <ul><li>What about the new file formats? </li></ul><ul><li>For documents, workbooks, and presentations, the default file format now has an “x” on the end, representing the XML format. For example, in Word, a document is now saved by default with the extension .docx, rather than .doc. </li></ul><ul><li>If you save a file as a template, the same applies: You get the template extension of old, with an “x” on the end; for example, .dotx in Word. </li></ul><ul><li>If your file contains code or macros, you have to save it using the new macro-enabled file format. For a Word document, that translates into .docm; for a Word template, it’s .dotm. </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system A bit more about the new format in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint:
    23. 23. <ul><li>Working with files from earlier versions </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system You may be the first in your group to get the 2007 Office system. Or you may work with departments that need to use Office documents saved in an earlier format. Don’t worry, you can still share documents between the 2007 Office system and earlier versions of Office programs.
    24. 24. <ul><li>Working with files from earlier versions </li></ul><ul><li>You can open a file created in previous versions of Office programs, from 95 through 2003. Just open the file as usual. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>After working with it in the 2007 version, you may want to save the file. By default, the Save As dialog box saves a file created in a previous version as that same version. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As you save, a Compatibility Checker will let you know of any new features added to the file that may be disabled, or matched as closely as possible. </li></ul></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Here’s how:
    25. 25. <ul><li>Working with files from earlier versions </li></ul><ul><li>Colleagues who have Word, Excel, or PowerPoint versions 2000 through 2003 (and the latest patches and service packs) can open 2007 files. </li></ul>Get up to speed with the 2007 Office system Here’s how: <ul><ul><li>When they open your document, they will be asked if they want to download a converter that will let them open your document. </li></ul></ul>
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