Samuel De Champlain Vahid[1]

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Samuel De Champlain Vahid[1]

  1. 1. Samuel de Champlain Vahid (5-B)
  2. 2. When and Where Did Samuel de Champlain Live? Samuel de Champlain lived  from 1567 to 1635 He was born in Brouage, a  seaport on France's west coast and moved to New France later on Samuel de Champlain had an  important role in his colony in New France
  3. 3. Samuel de Champlain’s Accomplishments Samuel de Champlain built two fur trading posts:  • Port Royal (1605) • Habitantion de Quebec (1608) He was the founder of Quebec  Samuel de Champlain earned the name “Father of New  France” He was a sailor, explorer, map-maker, writer, and  governor of New France Samuel de Champlain battled in the “Battle of  Ticonderoga” and killed 2 Iroquois chiefs
  4. 4. When and How Samuel de Champlain Died Samuel de Champlain was  ill from October to December 1635 He died on December 25  (Christmas) Samuel de Champlain  died when he was 68 years old
  5. 5. What Samuel de Champlain’s Daily Life Was Like Samuel de Champlain battled in hostile wars (“Battle  of Ticonderoga”) He went on long voyages  Samuel de Champlain had lots of interactions with  other people He was a very hard worker 
  6. 6. Samuel de Champlain’s Goals and Dreams Samuel de Champlain had a clear mission:  • It was to explore the country called New France, examine its waterways and then choose a site for a large trading factory
  7. 7. Samuel de Champlain’s Enemies The Iroquois and Huron were two of Samuel de  Champlain’s enemies Samuel de Champlain battled in the “Battle of  Ticonderoga” and killed 2 Iroquois chiefs Samuel de Champlain, and the rest of his colony, came  to New France looking for fur to trade with The Iroquois and Huron didn’t like the French  intruding their land

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