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Moral Absolutes
 

Moral Absolutes

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    Moral Absolutes Moral Absolutes Presentation Transcript

    •  
    • Is it ever right to do the wrong thing?
    • By the end of today you will:
      • KNOW what is meant by the term ‘moral absolute’
      • UNDERSTAND why some religious people think there are problems with making absolute moral rules
      • HAVE DEVELOPED your ability to think about moral questions critically
    • Profile: Brian Spillman
      • job: undercover police man
      • responsibility: to catch the criminal
      • so is he a failure??
    • Profile: Brian Spillman
      • job: undercover police man
      • responsibility: to catch the criminal
      • did he ‘do the wrong thing?’
    • So how do you know what to do?
      • this is asking you...
      • how do you decide what is the right thing to do?
      • how would you convince people that thought you were doing the wrong thing?
    • Remember this guy?
      • Immanuel Kant & the Categorical Imperative
      • people are starting to worry about how you know what to do
      • “ You should only do things which you would choose for everyone to do, all the time !”
    • “ You should only do things which you would choose for everyone to do, all the time !”
      • what would the world be like if policemen just let people go all the time ?
      • So according to Mr Kant, what he did was totally wrong. no doubt.
    • “ You should only do things which you would choose for everyone to do, all the time !”
    • perhaps it’s more complicated than that?
      • Should he have given him the keys?
      • Is it a difficult decision? Why?
    • Is it ever right to do the WRONG thing?
    • conflict of interests?
      • What do you think might be running through Brian's head?
      • Is he torn between two things that are right?
    • Q1- what would Kant say about Brian? was he right to do what he did?
    • a real life story...
      • imagine this was you
      • what would you say to defend yourself?
      • what would be the right thing to do?
    • an ancient story...
      • they had rules back then too...
      • really strict ones...
      • that would be punished...
      • some of them by stoning...
    • “ You should only do things which you would choose for everyone to do, all the time !”
    • Q2
      • What did Jesus think about human rules that were required to be kept absolutely?
      • How do you know?
    • Moral Absolutes
      • are when you think something is right or ususally wrong
      • but more than that...
      • it’s something that is never okay, no matter what happens...
    • Moral Absolutes
      • What sorts of things are we told in our daily lives are moral absolutes?
      • things about which there’s no discussion (q3).
    • What, Always??
      • Should you tell the truth even if you know something really bad will happen if you do?
      • q4
    • By the end of today you will:
      • KNOW what is meant by the term ‘moral absolute’
      • UNDERSTAND why some religious people think there are problems with making absolute rules
      • HAVE DEVELOPED your ability to think about ideas of moral questions
      • “ These contradictions simply don’t happen in real life.”- Geech
    • Extension
      • “ These contradictions simply don’t happen in real life.”- Geech
      Think about this statement. Is it true in your experience? Think of an example of people that “have done done what was wrong” but you think it might’ve been right.