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Laroche Alexandra Obesity
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Laroche Alexandra Obesity

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  • -A crude population measure of obesity is the body mass index (BMI), a person’s weight (in kilograms) divided by the square of his or her height (in meters).-A person with a BMI of 30 or more is generally considered obese. -Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer.-Once considered a problem only in high income countries, overweight and obesity are now dramatically on the rise in low- and middle-income countries, particularly in urban settings.Source:http://www.who.int/topics/obesity/en/
  • -This graph demonstrates obesity as a percentage of the population throughout countries. United States, Mexico and United Kingdom are the most obese countries in the world during 2007.
  • Each year 25,000 Canadians die because of obesity related deaths. As previously stated, obesity can lead to various chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. Source:http://www.drsharma.ca/obesity-canadians-more-fat-less-fit.html-In 2004, approximately 6.8 million Canadian adults ages 20 to 64 were overweight, and an additional 4.5 million were obese.-Between 1970-1972 and 1998, the proportion of Canadian adults considered overweight or obese increased from 40.0% to 50.7%. Source: http://www2.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/prb0511-e.htm
  • -This graph provesthateducation influences obesitylevels. The data shows that people withhighereducation have lower obese levels.
  • Edmonton uses the Obesity Staging system to determine the obesity severity of the Edmonton population Population is classified in stage 0 to stage 4, by conducting physical , blood and , sugar ,cholesterol testsA person at stage 0 has no obesity symptomsA person at stage 4 has severe obesity symptomsSource:http://www.ahfmr.ab.ca/researchnews/2010/spring/obesityepidemic/
  • -This graph demonstratesobesity as a percentagethroughoutCanada’s provinces. Newfoundland is the most obese of canadian provinces and British Columbia is the least obese.
  • -This graph demonstrates the level of obesity throughout specific time periods. We can conclude that the level of obesity amongst children was highest during the year 2004.
  • -This graph proves that age influences someone’s weight. From this data we can conclude that people between 45-64 are more obese.
  • -This graph shows that there is a strong correlation between the number of hours spent watching TV and the level of obesity in a country.
  • Transcript

    • 1. OBESITY
      BY:AlexandraLaRoche
    • 2. Definition
      Obesity: “A condition characterized by the excessive accumulation and storage of fat in the body.” (Webster Dictionary, 2011)
    • 3. Basic Information
      Obesity is measured by the body mass index (BMI)
      A BMI of 30 or more = obese
      Obesity can lead to diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer
      Obesity is common in low, middle and high income countries
    • 4. Top 10 Countries with Highest Obesity Levels
    • 5. Statistics
      25,000 deaths related to obesity and diet each year.
      In 2004 4.5 million Canadians were obese
      From 1970-1972 to 1998 the proportion of obese Canadians increased from 40.0% to 50.7%
    • 6. Obesity by Education Level in Canada 2005(ages 25-64)
    • 7. Edmonton Obesity Staging System
      4 stages of obesity
      Conducted through physical testing + blood sugar and cholesterol tests
      Stage 0 = no symptoms of obesity
      Stage 4= severe obesity symptoms
    • 8. Obesity by Province(2004)
      NFLD
    • 9. Childhood Obesity in Canada From 1978-2009 (ages 2-17)
    • 10. Obesity by Age in Canada(2004)
    • 11. Correlation between the Number of Hours of TV and Percentage of Obesity by Country (2007)
    • 12. Conclusion
      Obesity is a world wide epidemic
      U.S.A. and Mexico= highest obesity levels
      Statistics prove that education influences obesity level
      Age influences weight
      Newfoundland= highest obesity level in Canada
      Strong correlation between number of hours watching TV and obesity levels in a country
    • 13. Bibliography
      http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/hea_obe-health-obesity
      http://www.who.int/topics/obesity/en/
      http://www.drsharma.ca/obesity-canadians-more-fat-less-fit.html
      : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-620-m/2005001/t/adults-adultes/4053592-eng.htm
    • 14. Bibliography Continued
      http://www.merriam-webster.com/
      http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/med_tel_vie-media-television-viewing