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  • 1. StarterKey VocabProduction line modelVertical integration These two terms are used to describe Hollywood films of today. They oftenThe package share a wide range of characteristicsTreatment This is a script for a film longer thanBlockbuster a synopsis but not yet a full scriptHigh Concept This is when cinemas produced, distributed and exhibited films
  • 2. Producers & Audiences1) The ability to articulate your understanding of how cinema functions as a business and how business interacts with its audience.2) The ability to articulate a critical understanding of your own experience of Film.
  • 3. 8 key areas• The Hollywood Industry (then and now)• Film Finance & Film Production• Film Distribution• Film Exhibition• The British Film industry (then and now)• Film consumption: the cinema audience• The Star system• Film and new technologies
  • 4. 8 key areas• The Hollywood Industry (then and now)• Film Finance & Film Production• Film Distribution• Film Exhibition• The British Film industry (then and now)• Film consumption: the cinema audience• The Star system• Film and new technologies
  • 5. The Hollywood Industry: Now & Then
  • 6. Hollywood then….Golden Age 1930-1948During this time films were made on a production line model – criticisedtoo formulaic and similar. BIG FIVE Paramount / Loew’s / Fox Film/Warner Brothers / RKO(Columbia/Universal/United Artists)
  • 7. Studios controlled by a
  • 8. Vertical IntegrationThe big five all had vertical integration. They all had themeans to produce, distribute and exhibit films.They dominated the film industry in the 1930s and 1940sbecause of this.They did not have to buy in the services of distributors orexhibitors; all their profits were kept under one roof.
  • 9. End of world war 2• Social , economic and political forces brought the studio system to an end• Move out to the suburbs to create a stress free life after years of hardship/ anxiety• This led to a decline in cinema attendance• 1948 Supreme Court Ruling- forced the major companies to sell their cinemas to break the monopoly they had. They no longer owned all three main production areas.
  • 10. Hollywood Today
  • 11. Hollywood today• Today Hollywood make deals more than films.• An independent individual such as a producer puts together a package that they then present to investors.The package consists of: a treatment for a filmDetails of the castDetails of the director and locations If a studio like s the film they will agree to financeand produce it.
  • 12. Today more than 12 Studios in HollywoodMGM/ WARNER BROTHERS/SONY PICTURES STUDIO/PARAMOUNT/UNVERSAL STUDIOS/ 20TH Century Fox/DREAMWORKS4/5 still existSome studios have particular relationships with directors and give them first options on film ideas. Steven Spielberg with Dream works for example.Warner Bros- end of vertical integration?
  • 13. • blockbusters 2011
  • 14. Battleship trailer Storyline Based on the classic Hasbro naval combat game, Battleship is the story of an international fleet of ships who come across an alien armada whilst on a Naval war games exercise. An intense battle ensues over sea, land and air. What do they aliens - known as The Regents - want?
  • 15. • The Hunger Games Trailer Storyline In a dystopian future, the totalitarian nation of Panem is divided between 12 districts and the Capitol. Each year two young representatives from each district are selected by lottery to participate in The Hunger Games. Part entertainment, part brutal retribution for a past rebellion, the televised games are broadcast throughout Panem. The 24 participants are forced to eliminate their competitors while the citizens of Panem are required to watch. When 16-year-old Katnisss young sister, Prim, is selected as District 12s female representative, Katniss volunteers to take her place. She and her male counterpart Peeta, are pitted against bigger, stronger representatives who have trained for this their whole lives.
  • 16. Cabin in the Woods trailer Storyline Five friends go for a break at a remote cabin in the woods, where they get more than they bargained for. Together, they must discover the truth behind the cabin in the woods.
  • 17. Characteristics of a Blockbuster1. Storyline • box office stats2. Characters3. Selling4. Profits
  • 18. storylineBlockbusters have simple storylines that are easyto understand and have universal appeal. why?1) Created to appeal to the global audience- omit culturally specific detail to appeal to wider audience.2) Wider audience means more profit from DVDs, and associated sales.3) Simple stories succeed the best eg Love Stories with tragic endings. Think Shakespeare., AUDIENCES KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT.4) Love and Loss/ Good over Evil/ Fighting against the odds5) Disaster movies where the destruction of the world is averted.- universal hopes and fears
  • 19. charactersBlockbusters are populated by characters that areeasy to understand.• The characters tend to be easily understandable by younger viewers so complex psychological states tend not to be present.• Characters tend not to alienate other cultures or take strong ideological stances• Characters tend to want to save the world or save the one they love
  • 20. Sold on looksBlockbuster films are sold on their look.• Exciting , special effects- CGI/ PYROTECHNICS• They look expensive-not experimental• Spectacular• They excite through visual display NOT dialogue reliant• Huge action set pieces• Obvious from trailers
  • 21. profitsThe enormous financial outlay is not recoupedthrough the box office alone. DVDs / Box Office / PTV / TV rights MERCHANDISING often brings the greatest reward
  • 22. The visual appeal of ‘Blockbuster’ films is often called the……… ‘Impact Aesthetic’.• This means the audience is invited to sit back and enjoy the sheer scale and impressive detail of the film.• This is the so-called “wow” response factor!• The audience admire the use of CGI – and how convincing it is.• The appearance of a ‘star’ is often part of this ‘impact aesthetic’. In the following sequence from a ‘Blockbuster’ - grade your “Wow” factor out of ten….and name the ‘star’!
  • 23. profitsThe enormous financial outlay is not recoupedthrough the box office alone. DVDs / Box Office / PTV / TV rights MERCHANDISING often brings the greatest reward
  • 24. Titanic
  • 25. Titanic Case StudyIdentify the four areas in the Titanic Case StudyStorylineCharactersThe LookProfits
  • 26. While we wait to start ……. Can you remember, the four characteristics of a ‘Blockbuster’ film?
  • 27. The four characteristics of a ‘Blockbuster’ film: 1. Simple, easy to understand storylines with global appeal. 2. Simple characters with simple motives.3. Marketed on their spectacular look (inc. CGI). Visual impact may be more important than the dialogue.4. Marketed as a ‘brand’ Franchising also includes toys, games, clothes, bed linen….
  • 28. Unit FS2: Producers and Audiences. Aims of lesson:•To study further the phenomenon of the ‘Blockbuster’ film inHollywood.•To consider the relevance of ‘High Concept’ film-making.•To think about the ‘Impact Aesthetic’.
  • 29. ‘High Concept’ is the theory behind all this! ‘High concept’ film-making means:• A style of film-making based around simple narrative ideas – designed to fit into marketing and merchandising operations.• ‘High concept’ film-making is therefore a big aspect of Blockbuster films!• Thinking of studio : keep things simple – makes lots of money!• ‘High-concept’ is now the driving force behind creative decision-making in most mainstream, Hollywood films.
  • 30. So let me ask you…………. Does the production of ‘blockbuster’ films and ‘high-concept’ film-making……………• Lead to movies without ‘brains’? Does it have to mean films ‘dumb-down’ – and reduce quality?• Does the merchandising aspect (tie-in toys, games….) exploit children?
  • 31. The visual appeal of ‘Blockbuster’ films is often called the……… ‘Impact Aesthetic’.• This means the audience is invited to sit back and enjoy the sheer scale and impressive detail of the film.• This is the so-called “wow” response factor!• The audience admire the use of CGI – and how convincing it is.• The appearance of a ‘star’ is often part of this ‘impact aesthetic’. In the following sequence from a ‘Blockbuster’ - grade your “Wow” factor out of ten….and name the ‘star’!
  • 32. How important is the ‘ImpactAesthetic’ to you when you go to see a film?
  • 33. ‘Blockbuster’ Group Task:• Select your envelope.• Read your task.• Return to classroom at:• Present your results to class at: