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Eurodidaweb2014 03-17 21 day 1-2

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Eurodidaweb Part 1 (day 1 day 2)

Eurodidaweb Part 1 (day 1 day 2)

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  • 1. Eurodidaweb 2014 Part 1 17/21-03-2014 - Stefano Lariccia – Digilab - Noematics Sapienza Università di Roma Alberto Pigliacelli Europaclub From e-learning to Web-learning: placeless, connected, expansible, flexible, effective learning stefano.lariccia@uniroma1.it
  • 2. Premises and objectives • What are the objectives of this course? – The main objective of this course is to expose the participants / (emulating) students, to a vast body of knowledge and competences on the different uses of ICT (information and communication technologies) throughout the globe, focusing especially on – new learning methods based on the – ubiquitous worldwideweb. This is what we call – web-learning. Much of the class focuses on discussion based on readings assigned out of class.
  • 3. Premises and objectives • What are the objectives of this course? – Another objective of this course is to give students hands-on experience with: • web 2.0 / web 3.0 tools to cope with the complexity of the cloud based, ubiquitous, new style of knowledge management; • with international practices of web-learning through web technology; with a critical analysis of what our students are exposed to in their nomadic usage of the Web.
  • 4. Premises and objectives • What are the objectives of this course? –Throughout the course, during this week, we work on: • globally-based projects • that leverage the benefits of information and communication technologies • to positively affect many diverse learning community.
  • 5. Premises and objectives • What are the objectives of this course? • How will be achieved?
  • 6. premises • How will be achieved? In grasping experience some of us perceive new information through experiencing the concrete, tangible, felt qualities of the world, relying on our senses and immersing ourselves in concrete reality. Others tend to perceive, grasp, or take hold of new information through symbolic representation or abstract conceptualization – thinking about, analyzing, or systematically planning, rather than using sensation as a guide. Similarly, in transforming or processing experience some of us tend to carefully watch others who are involved in the experience and reflect on what happens, while others choose to jump right in and start doing things. The watchers favor reflective observation, while the doers favor active experimentation.
  • 7. premises • How will be achieved? Each dimension of the learning process presents us with a choice. Since it is virtually impossible, for example, to simultaneously • drive a car (Concrete Experience) and • analyze a driver’s manual about the car’s functioning (Abstract Conceptualization), we resolve the conflict by choosing. Because of our hereditary equipment, our particular past life experiences, and the demands of our present environment, we develop a preferred way of choosing. We resolve the conflict between concrete or abstract and between active or reflective in some patterned, characteristic ways. We call these patterned ways “learning styles.” Kolb, D. A. (1984) Experiential Learning. Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Prentice Hall Read more: Experiential Workplace Learning | E-Learning Curve Blog
  • 8. Web learning: basics • What is the WorldWideWeb? • When it was developed? • Who controls its progress and its evolution? • Why the web is so fast-growing? • Why a teacher / learner should learn about the WorldWideWeb?
  • 9. WorldWideWeb=learning • You are using e-mail: e-mail started since 1970 • You are using e-learning: e-learning started in 1980 • 2010 and forward: you will probably use web- learning: where the web 2.0-3.0 and ease of use are bridging together to enhance teaching and learning activities
  • 10. Web-learning 2.0 basics: let me introduce to you some useful tool
  • 11. Web-learning 2.0 basics: let me introduce to you some useful tool 1. Internet is a safe place… provided you behave safely. Once you will begin to use the Web 2.0 you will discover soon that a Web 2.0 user is overwhelmed by many access passwords. 2. First of all, then, you need a keychain 3. My suggestion is: Lastpass; Open Source, free,
  • 12. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.) 1. Internet is a safe place… provided you behave safely. Once you will begin to use the Web 2.0 you will discover soon that a Web 2.0 user is overwhelmed by many access passwords. 2. First of all, then, you need a keychain 3. My suggestion is: LastPass ****; Open Source, free,
  • 13. 1. Internet is a huge place… and you can loose yourself in the clouds… 2. Once you will begin to use the Web 2.0 you will discover soon that a Web 2.0 user is overwhelmed by many bookmarks ... 3. And the right one is ever in the wrong place. Let’s transform Bookmarks into “placeless tags”: xmarks will do this work for you Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  • 14. 1. Internet is a huge place… and you can loose your own teaching material … 2. Once again you will need a placeless safe location to save your didactic presentation ... 3. You’ve got thousands of slideshows presentation … And the right one is ever in the wrong place. Let’s transform PowerPoint into “placeless slide repository”: Slideshare will do this work for you Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  • 15. 1. Internet is such a huge repository … and you can loose your own book reference list … 2. Once again you will need a placeless safe location to save your book references... 3. You’ve got thousands of reading list for your students … And the right one is ever in the wrong place. Let’s transform “Biblioscape” into a “placeless references repository”: Citeulike will do this work for you Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  • 16. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.) 1. Internet is such a huge repository … and you can loose your own Contact List … 2. Once again you will need a placeless safe location to save your book references... 3. You’ve got thousands of reading list for your students … And the right one is ever in the wrong place. Let’s transform “Outlook” into a “placeless contact list and calendar”: Plaxo will do this work for you
  • 17. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.) 1. Internet is such a huge repository … and you can loose your own Contact List and Calendar … 2. Once again you will need a placeless safe location to save your book references... 3. You’ve got thousands of reading list for your students … And the right one is ever in the wrong place. Let’s transform “Outlook” into a “placeless contact list and calendar”: Google Calendar will do this work for you as well
  • 18. • Social Network – Social Network management systems can be a support to learning activities – You should try to encourage selection and usage of a serious social network like environment – Linkedin is a generalist yet “professional oriented” SN environment Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  • 19. – Edmodo | Secure Social Learning Network for Teachers and Students • www.edmodo.com/; Edmodo provides a safe and easy way for your class to connect and collaborate, share content, and access homework, grades and school notices. Our goal is to ... – TeachersRecess - The Teacher Social Network and File Sharing ... • www.teachersrecess.com/ The Teachers Social Network. ... Teachers Recess Community. Use the Community to: • Make Friends • Find Colleagues • Network • Share Ideas and More! FAQs - Wtf911 swaggsec bitchessss - Help - Register now! – Home - Teachers Social Network • www.teachersn.com/ - Get in touch with other teachers trough this social network site. Exchange teaching experiences, ideas and teaching materials with other teachers and students. Lesson Plans - Register - Web Site Terms and ... - About – NEA - Online Social Networking for Educators • www.nea.org/home/20746.htm - The vast majority of educators use social networking discreetly and professionally to make connections that can enhance careers, not jeopardize them. – 25 Excellent Social Media Sites for Teachers | The Digital Learning ... • toponlineuniversityreviews.com/.../25-excellent... - 25 Excellent Social Media Sites for Teachers. Are you a teacher who wants to increase collaboration and skill development to students? Teamwork can increase ... Web-learning 2.0 - Social Networks
  • 20. – http://www.educationalnetworking.com/List+of+Networks – Guidelines for Educators Using Social Networking Sites - Home ... • doug-johnson.squarespace.com/.../guidelines-f... - • 7 Aug 2009 – The district strongly discourages teachers from accepting invitations to friend students within these social networking sites. When students gain ... – Free Educational Resources for Educators and Teachers ... – www.teachade.com/ - Stati Uniti - – The first social networking website designed specifically for educators. Because of the ability to harness the online community, Teachade has become one of the ... – Teachers and Social Networks: To Facebook Or Not To Facebook? • blogs.gartner.com/.../teachers-and-social-netwo... - • 6 Jun 2009 – First of all, there is no clear code of conduct for teachers on social media: some automatically accept any student's or parent 's request, some ... – Teaching and learning through social networks | TeachingEnglish ... – www.teachingenglish.org.uk/.../teaching-learning-thro... – In 2007, the British Council conducted market research into how the Internet has affected the preferred learning ... Web-learning 2.0 - Social Networks
  • 21. – Impact of Social Networks on learning and teaching activities • http://ftp.jrc.es/EURdoc/JRC56958.pdf Web-learning 2.0 - Social Networks
  • 22. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  • 23. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.) • University of Auckland, • The Auckland University of Technology,
  • 24. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  • 25. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  • 26. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  • 27. Cooperative Web-learning, Plone Style (1) • Using the WorldWideWeb (and a Plone site as a social knowledge aggregator) as a virtually unlimited land for harvesting new data and extracting knowledge from data • Using the aggregator site as a “product” on which students are working together in small groups to synthetize and structure “new knowledge” • Using the aggregator site, and its systems of rules, to study the hierarchy of relations in the class We are defining here how can we use constructivist theories and use cooperative learning methods to exploit the pedagogical power of the WorldWideWeb: in the next slides we propose some issue and practical example of “how to” take the opportunities we are given with the introduction of a Knowledge aggregator, in our case a Plone site, in our classroom
  • 28. Cooperative Web-learning, Plone Style (2) 1. Definition: Cooperative learning is a form of active learning where students work together to perform specific tasks in a small group. 2. Definition: What is cooperative learning? Cooperative Learning is a teaching approach that is unique in its own way. Cooperative Learning is when individuals come together as a group to teach each other what they know or understand of any given subject. The true definition of Cooperative Learning is the “instructional use of small groups so that students work together to maximize their own and each other’s learning”. There are many suggestive theory about cooperative education and peer to peer education. Short definitions, found on specialize sites, may help:
  • 29. Cooperative Web-learning, Plone Style (3) Now we will experiment in our group as it were your classroom. We split the group into 2-3-4 small groups. Let’s state her our task to explore directly methods and techniques during the third day of Eurodidaweb course: 1. Step: divide the class into several (3-4-5) small groups 2. Step: each group will be assigned with a precise task: in our case each task will be part of a higher level goal that is common to the classroom: <Assignement: explore and getting to know background and settings of the movies “La dolce vita” and “The Great Beauty” to understand contemporary mentality of the city of Rome> 3. Step: prepare the framework (a Plone site based on Ploud) in which the Assignment will be published on the Web and understand how the teamwork can produce a better result for each group member and for every participant
  • 30. Cooperative Web-learning, Plone Style (4) Now we will experiment in our group as it were your classroom. We split the group into 2-3 small groups. Let’s define here our task of exploring directly methods and techniques of Cooperative learning during the third day of the Eurodidaweb course: 4. Step: provide all the participants (the class) with the information they need to use a Plone Site as an Aggregator of Teamwork results 5. Step: Focus their attention on the specific tools of this CMS to provide the best results 6. Step: let's work so that the participants will understand in details how the teamwork is proven to produce a better sharable result, and thus how the result should be a better product compared to the product of a single learner 7. Step: at the same time, a better learning process for each group member and for every participant of the class is proven in a classroom inspired by Cooperative Learning techniques
  • 31. Cooperative Web-learning. Product assignements (1) Assignments: 1. Teamwork Assignment: Discover the beauty of Rome following locations and itineraries of the 2014 Oscar Winner Movie “The Great Beauty” (P.Sorrentino) 1. Prepare your site as a platform to cooperate with your team 2. Define the final goal: A multimedia tale to be published on your site, a collection of images with comments of the team members; an Historic essay describing the places, the squares, fountains and monuments represented in the movie 2. Teamwork Assignment: Discover the beauty of Rome following locations and itineraries of the 1960 Palma d’oro and 1962 Oscar Winner Movie “La dolce vita” (F.Fellini) 1. Prepare your site as a platform to cooperate with your team 2. Define the final goal: A multimedia tale to be published on your site, a collection of images with comments of the team members; an Historic essay describing the places, the squares, fountains and monuments represented in the movie
  • 32. Cooperative Web-learning. Product assignements (1) Assignments: 1. Teamwork Assignment: Discover the beauty of Rome following locations and itineraries of the 1960 Palma d’oro and 1962 Oscar Winner Movie “La dolce vita” (F.Fellini) 1. Prepare your site as a platform to cooperate with your team 2. Define the final goal: A multimedia tale to be published on your site, a collection of images with comments of the team members; an Historic essay describing the places, the squares, fountains and monuments represented in the movie 3. Resources: explore La Dolce Vita http://www.romaapiedi.com/itinerari-turistici-roma/dolce-vita/
  • 33. Cooperative Web-learning. Product assignements (1) Assignments: 1. Teamwork Assignment: Discover the beauty of Rome following locations and itineraries of the 2014 Oscar Winner Movie “The Great Beauty” (P.Sorrentino) 1. Resources: explore the great beauty, Swide http://www.swide.com/art-culture/movies/the-great-beauty-tour-of-movie- locations-in-rome-italy/2013/06/01
  • 34. Resources and references Resource type and name: References: Plone; A definitive Guide to Plone Exe LO Editor Manual http://wikieducator.org/Online_manual/E mbedding_eXe_resources