Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Innovation as Problem Solving: Managing Problem Spaces

1,040

Published on

This presentation provides an overview of how Problem Solving and Innovation can be enhanced through the exploitation of Problem Space Management. This presentation is one of a series of briefs …

This presentation provides an overview of how Problem Solving and Innovation can be enhanced through the exploitation of Problem Space Management. This presentation is one of a series of briefs highlighting aspects of our InnovationWorx practice.

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,040
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  1.  
  2. The Future Begins… with an idea Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. <ul><li>Innovation represents the deliberate attempt to change current reality. </li></ul><ul><li>Those who believe that things can be better or can be done better have the motivation to pursue change – Innovation is the roadmap or blueprint for that change. </li></ul><ul><li>The Future consists of thousands of such blueprints coming together to build a new reality – Innovation Worx is dedicated to providing consistent and actionable Innovation for you… </li></ul>
  3. Introduction Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. <ul><li>The argument can be made that most if not all Innovation is a problem-solving exercise. </li></ul><ul><li>If we accept this to be true then we’ve been given the key to transforming Innovation into a predictable, repeatable and consistent exercise. </li></ul><ul><li>Problem-Solving can be more than a one-off activity. It is also necessarily more than distinct empirical exercises as well. </li></ul><ul><li>This presentation will examine how problem solving can be managed utilizing a logical construct known as Problem Spaces . </li></ul>
  4. Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. Problems exist everywhere – but how many of them are truly isolated and how many are related?
  5. What is Problem Solving ? Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. <ul><li>Problem Solving is often viewed in either / or terms. People often view it as one extreme or the other – either artistic or scientific – one approach applying a method or discipline and the other approach dependent upon individual creativity. </li></ul><ul><li>Both of these views however are limiting. Problem Solving involves not just a single problem – but a set of related problems. This related problem set is in effect a ‘Problem Space .’ Tackling a problem space goes beyond ordinary empirical methodology and it also requires creative input from more than one individual. </li></ul>
  6. Problem Space Characteristics
  7. Problem Spaces Explained Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. <ul><li>Problem Spaces exhibit three primary characteristics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A Causality Set – Those elements which influence or cause the problem/s. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A Manifestation Set – Those elements which demonstrate the problem/s. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A Resolution Set – Those elements which may impact the previous two sets. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>As noted before, a Problem Space likely also involves or contains more than one specific problem. </li></ul>
  8. Problem Solving is Nonlinear
  9. Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. <ul><li>A very important consideration in all problem solving is the ability to support not just consistent methodology, but also the ability to leverage automation and knowledge management technology. </li></ul><ul><li>In the previous diagram we’ve illustrated a process within a system of systems ‘ecosystem’ - one that allows for management of problem spaces across relatively large data sets. </li></ul><ul><li>In real life, unlike in conventional empirical science, discovery & progress occurs in bursts and in unexpected ways – it’s nonlinear. </li></ul>Problem Solving Automation
  10. Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. The true power of Problem Solving is in the potential for collaborative analysis – current empirical discovery emphasizes the individual over the team…
  11. The World is Connected All Problem Spaces are related , the key is being able to understand where and how they are related. Artificially separating problems / problem domains leads to incomplete understanding.
  12. Problems are Concepts First Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. <ul><li>Every problem can be represented either symbolically or conceptually or both. </li></ul><ul><li>Thus a problem and its related problem space and any other related problem spaces are logical in nature (they may also have physical attributes). </li></ul><ul><li>Problems and problem spaces can thus be represented and connected using data entities and meta-data. </li></ul><ul><li>Problems and problem spaces are not static – they are dynamic (change over time). </li></ul>
  13. Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. Few problems fit entirely within the dimensions of typical empirical experiments. Problems are complex and interconnected – experiments strive for simplicity.
  14. Problem Semantics
  15. Exploiting Problem Semantics Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. <ul><li>Exploitation of problem semantics requires clear definitions. It also requires the ability to examine specific problem instances in context . </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Set Description – Describes a problem domain or set of related problems. </li></ul><ul><li>The Problem Description – Describes a generic or specific problem instance. </li></ul><ul><li>Problem (Use) Cases – Places problem instances into real-world contexts. </li></ul><ul><li>Problem element Metadata – This allows for all aspects of a problem, problem instance or problem space to be characterized and compared. </li></ul>
  16. Problem Instances Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. <ul><li>A problem can be viewed much like a Class in Object Oriented programming. </li></ul><ul><li>In other words, it can exist both as a generic description as well as specific instance. </li></ul><ul><li>There is thus always the probability that instances will differ in some way from the generic description. </li></ul><ul><li>Having the flexibility to manage problems and problem spaces in this fashion allows innovators more opportunities to discover successful resolutions. </li></ul>
  17. Web Servers are one thing, Nuclear Reactors are a bit more dangerous – there are systems which absolutely must not FAIL. The majority of problem solving and innovation exercises involve improvement of existing situations rather than invention of new solutions. Invention is more exciting but improvements are important too…
  18. Problem-Based Assessments Problem Spaces allow for the management of any number of problem-based assessment scenarios. This is supported by direct correlation between (related) Use Cases translated to a Scenario context (more focused) through the evaluation test cases. Key point to keep in mind – a Problem Use Case can have many different evaluation scenario contexts / test cases.
  19. Problem-Solving is Learning While studying key concepts related to aeronautics, the Wright Brothers realized that many issues had not yet been solved… Learning is symbiotic with problem-solving …
  20. Continuous Innovation
  21. Applied Problem Spaces <ul><li>The previous diagram illustrates an example of where problems and problem space management are applied directly to a Continuous Innovation paradigm. </li></ul><ul><li>The example recognizes the relationship between problem domains and multiple innovation initiatives. This type of approach allows for coordinated synergy amongst related efforts. </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Space Management can be applied to science, to information systems, to government – to just about any endeavor. </li></ul>
  22. The search for answers begins with the ability to not only ask the right questions but to place the entire set of questions together within a coherent context.
  23. Conclusion <ul><li>Problem Spaces provide the basis for improved methodologies for problem solving. Problem solving is the foundation for developing consistent Innovation. </li></ul><ul><li>Problem spaces can be framed around every major problem we face as a society – and they can be addressed collectively and collaboratively in near-real time across the globe. </li></ul><ul><li>When seeking answers and understanding what works or not, context matters… </li></ul>
  24. Semantech Inc. is InnovationWorx <ul><li>Semantech Inc. is a solutions provider founded in 2007. Our company is located in the Dayton, Ohio metro area. Since our inception we have supported clients in a more than half a dozen industries nationwide. </li></ul><ul><li>Our company represents a unique approach – we’re not offering just IT or Management Consulting. We specialize in facilitating complex organizational Transformations. This is why Innovation Worx was created. Semantech was founded to facilitate change… </li></ul>
  25. Defining Reality Reality is a shared conceptual perspective of the world around us. As we contribute new ideas to that perspective – reality changes …

×