I parent 10 19

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Presentation given at the 10/19/11 Arkansas Parenting Education Network (APEN) conference in Hot Springs, AR.

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I parent 10 19

  1. 1. iParentOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 1
  2. 2. Reaching the iParent: The changing world of technology and its impact on parent education.October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 2
  3. 3. An average of 9 hours a day of media consumption, creation and interactionOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota Wired.com 3
  4. 4. October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 4
  5. 5. © Martin CathraeOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 5
  6. 6. © GlisglisOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 6
  7. 7. © Dan Harellson© Josh Higgins © Thomas Hawk © Anya Quinn October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 7 © Stephen Hackett
  8. 8. © MatthewOctober 19, 2011 T. Rader (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 8
  9. 9. How do parents use information & communications technologies?October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 9
  10. 10. Areas of Published Research on Parents Online• Representative studies of parent behavior with web pages, social media (e.g., Pew, 2002; Briccoli, Gentile, Smelser & Serpelloni, 2007)• Studies of use of specific sites designed for parents (e.g., Chan, 2008; Sarkadi & Bremberg, 2004; Bowers & Ebata, 2009)• Studies of specific groups of parents’ online behavior (e.g., Blackburn & Read, 2005; Scharer, 2005)October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 10
  11. 11. Device Use* 100 94 87.2 90 81.7 80 70 60.1 60.1 60 46.9 46.8 44.1 50 42.3 42.1 40 30 16.1 20 10 0 *In addition to TV, radio, DVD players & cell phones. % of N=1653 parents.October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 11
  12. 12. Summary & analysis of findings about parents online from published academic literature*• Parents go online to find information: – 70% seek health information; – 86% of parents to be go online to find info about pregnancy and delivery • Parents go online to make social connections/ for social support • Parents use a range of technologies for communication & personal expression • Technology use is individualized, complementary and multifunctionalFor a recent review, see Plantin & Danebek, 2009. Parenthood, information and support on the internet. Aliterature review of parents and professionals online. University of Minnesota 10, 34.October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, BMC Family Practice, 12
  13. 13. Parents’ technology activity (n=1653; % those reporting activity at least weekly) [ information communication social /// mixed other ] photos 59.7 shop 40.1 read news 93.3 games 25.9 online classes 16.8 podcasts 11 web conference 18.6Maintain website 16.5 SNS 70.6 Email 99.1 Text 68.1 Disc boards 35.7 Twitter 12.5 Use blogs 38 Look for info 89.5 0 20 40 60 80 100October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 13
  14. 14. Parents use a lot of devices, for activities, like communication© Josh Higgins © Thomas Hawk © Anya Quinn October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 14 © Stephen Hackett
  15. 15. They seek Information…. October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 15
  16. 16. They Share with Others and Seek Support…. October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 16
  17. 17. And they ExpressThemselves! October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 17
  18. 18. And sometimes TwitterOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 18
  19. 19. INDIVIDUALIZED: Some Influences on Parent Use• Income and education• Child age• Availability of social contacts• Availability of computers, access to the Internet• Confidence in own skills• Perception of value• Perception of Information quality• Preference for site/tech features• Search skillsOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 19
  20. 20. INDIVIDUALIZED: Variation in Parents’ Use of ICT (by frequency of 4 activities, # devices & attitude) 7% 5% 17% Omnivore + + + 8% Overloaded + + - Freq/Few + - + Mod/happy 0 0 + 14% Connected/Hassled 0 0 - 12% InfoCentric Low/Satisfied - - + 5% Dabbler + - + 17% Indifferent - - - 15% *based on survey of 1653 parents; Aug. 2010. Walker, S., Dworkin, J & Connell, J. (inOctober 19, 2011 Research J). press, FCS (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 20
  21. 21. COMPLEMENTARY: The web is one source of information for parents*dont seek info books/mags friends m/m in law other other rel partner pediatrician web sites 0 20 40 60 80 100 Hart Research Associates. (2009). Parenting and toddlers today: Research findings.October 19, 2011 www.zerotothree.org (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 21
  22. 22. COMPLEMENTARY/MUTLIFUNCTIONAL: Support from many activities 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 WEEKLY: WEEKLY: SNS MONTHLY: LESS THAN Discussion (n=769) Read/comment MONTHLY: Boards (n=333) blogs (n=467) Online classes (n=454) Build support network Connect w/ others like me Based on 1653 parents in sample. In Dworkin,. Walker, Hughes, Connell &October 19, 2011 (under review). (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota Ebata 22
  23. 23. COMPLEMENTARY & MULTIFUNCTIONAL:Communication with important others 80 70 60 50 My Children 40 Extended Family 30 Childs Other Parent 20 Other parents 10 0 Email (n=1388) Text message Use SNS (n=901) (n=769) Based on 1653 parents in sample and those reporting at least weekly activity. In Dworkin,. Walker, Hughes, Connell & Ebata (under review).October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 23
  24. 24. How are parents using ICT as parents?• Through use of a range of devices• To find & share information –in a variety of ways and purposes• To make social connections/ for social support - in a variety of ways• For communication & personal expression- with a range of others through a variety of media• Parents’ technology use is individualized, complementary, and multifunctionalOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 24
  25. 25. What does this mean for parents? And parenting?• Further research is needed to understand impact on parent abilities, relationships -> parenting -> child/family/parent outcomes• The opportunities technology affords parents* – to fulfill responsibilities of parenting – towards their personal development – to enhance their knowledge – to build/maintain relationships & their informal learning & support communitiesOctober 19, 2011 * Interactive with their offline/’real’ (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota worlds 25
  26. 26. Potential Domains of Parenting Indicators for Further Study Parent Development •To express themselves as parents (validate identity) Parent-Child Relationships •Spend time with children •Communicate and connect with children Child Development •To gather and exchange information about health, development, parenting Family Development •To work to provide for the family •To manage resources for the family •To purchase and find items for the family Culture and Community •To share information about their children; to stay in touch •To exchange emotional support and participate in a community. •To connect with extended others important to the child (e.g., teachers, coaches).October 19, 2011 *categories in MN Parent Education Curriculum Framework (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 26
  27. 27. What does this mean for parenting education?• Most of our parents are iParents: using some kind of and probably many different technologies – what do you know about your learners?• Most of our parents have new ways to learn through exposure to a broader community of information and influence sources –how do you capitalize on this? How do you do it in ways that provide quality parenting education?October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 27
  28. 28. Capitalizing on parents’ digital connections: delivery mechanisms to reach a wider range of parentsOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 28
  29. 29. Capitalizing on parents’ digital connections: complementing informal learning“People are finding coaching where • Most learning is informal:they need it, community where theywant it, and lectures and social and experientialdemonstrations for those days whenthey have the time.” • Parents’ online worlds Stephen Downes increase their informal learning community • Do we complement? Formal Social Integrate? Experiential October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 29
  30. 30. communication + information + social interaction parenting education???October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 30
  31. 31. CAPITALIZING ON PARENTS’ DIGITAL CONNECTIONS: PROVIDE QUALITY INTENTIONAL PE Knowledge-Centered learning: features support learning a range of content, presented accurately Community-centered learning: the features support learners making meaningful connections to other learners, to the instructor Assessment-centered learning: the features allow for self-reflection and assessment of growth Learner-centered learning: do the features support the range of individual adult learning needs *Bransford, Brown & Cocking, 2000. How people learn: Brain, mind, experience and school. Washington, D.C: Committee on MinnesotaOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Developments in the Science of 31 Learning.
  32. 32. CAPITALIZING ON PARENTS’ DIGITAL CONNECTIONS: PROVIDE QUALITY INTENTIONAL PE Know what the goals of parenting education (both process & outcomes) are and choose the technology to accomplish those goals – whether alone or in combination with face to face. - Outreach - Awareness - Knowledge - Relationship enhancement - Skill building - Learner interactionOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 32 © Laszlo Ilyes
  33. 33. What does this mean to the parenting educator?October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 33
  34. 34. Tech integration as a parenting educator competency TPACK: “A teacher capable of negotiating these relationships represents a form of expertise different from, and greater than, the knowledge of a disciplinary expert (say a mathematician or a historian), a technology expert (a computer scientist) and a pedagogical expert (an experienced educator).” Mishra & Koehler (2006).October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 34
  35. 35. MN Board of Teaching Standards: Technology Integration*2H. demonstrate knowledge andunderstanding of concepts related totechnology and student learning. 3R. identify and apply technology resources to enable and empower learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities. 6K. use a variety of media and educational technology to enrich learning opportunities. 9M. understand the role of continuous development in technology knowledge and skills representative of technology applications for education. October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 35 *Selected from 8710.2000 Standard of Effective Practice_TECHNOLOGY
  36. 36. What is your role in helping the iParent?• Integrator – bringing technology in as an effective tool for your instructional goals & processes (including relationship building)?• Participant educator – participating in online discussions about parenting?• Content facilitator – for parents to understand how technology affects their lives, their children, their parenting?• Mediator – for parents’ effective and proper use in their own lives? In your programs?• Advocate – for ALL parents to have equal access to & facilitation with technologyOctober 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 36
  37. 37. 6 Tips for the iParent Educator © Loud Waterfall Photography 1. Come into the water & know who you’re swimming with (who are your iParents?) 2. Go only as far as you need to (good pedagogy) 3. Respect your limits (you can only do so much) 4. Be prepared: rocky waters ahead (ethics) 5. Remember that people are watching (be a good digital citizen) 6. Go with an experienced buddy (find support)October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 37
  38. 38. And Have Fun! © Marc AlecOctober 19, 2011 Macatangay (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 38
  39. 39. Susan K. Walker, PhD University of Minnesota Department of Family Social Science skwalker@umn.edu 612-624-1273 www.cehd.umn.edu/fsos/parent20/October 19, 2011 (c) Susan Walker, University of Minnesota 39

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