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Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
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Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed

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Presented at the 2013 NACADA Region 2 Conference

Presented at the 2013 NACADA Region 2 Conference
3.15.2013

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  • -Explain what Camtasia is: Video editing software; can use to make and edit your own videos. It can record your screen to capture PowerPoint slides, demos, webpages, and more. -Why online workshop developed?: -Online workshop developed to allow more flexibility for non-traditional students that take evening courses and cannot attend during the day; the information being presented was very important and we wanted to provide another way for students to be informed
  • New Dean of Academic Services Academic probation became an office priority; supported and expanded initiatives Started dedicating more time/resources
  • Why 14 credits?: many students take developmental courses in English and math that are between 4 – 6 credits. This increase allowed room for these courses.
  • Now we will discuss the academic success course in detail
  • Our approach to advising students on probation is based upon several theories of advising: Not an either/or approach but a and/or philosophy. Developmental theories such as: -Prescriptive advising: based on authority between advisor and student
  • Student: population, academic tendencies, academic behaviors Interaction within the course: peer-peer; instructor-student; student-content Content: what is? How to present it? What components do you have? Outcomes? How are you going to assess those outcomes?
  • When considering design the most important thing is to make your learning outcomes explicit at the course and module (weeks, topic, etc.) level. Ask: What do I want the students to know at the end of the course. Ask: What do I want the students to know at the end of the week, topic, etc. Handout worksheet
  • Handout: Course Menu/Start Here
  • Handout: Assignment Calendar/Assignment Expectations
  • Attended workshop on self-efficacy and motivation

Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed Presentation Transcript

  • Helping Students on AcademicProbation to Persist and Succeed Robert M. Kurland, Ph.D., Associate Dean Office of Academic Services, Rutgers University – Newark Dijha R. Allen, Ed.M., Academic Advisor/Probation Coordinator Office of Academic Services, Rutgers University – Newark Shelley C. Kurland, M.A.T., Instructional Designer Center for Teaching Excellence, County College of Morris
  • NACADA 3-2013 Overview• The Office of Academic Services• At-risk students• Previous practices• Recent practices• Current initiatives – course development• Future Directions 2Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Office of Academic Services• Staff size and structure (teams)• Responsibilities include: Academic Advisement Academic Integrity Academic Probation & Dismissal Convocation First Year Services Graduation Certification Peer Advisor Program Pre-Professional Programs Reenrollment Reinstatement School-to-School Transfers Placement Testing Transcript Evaluations Transfer Services 3Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Background• As the practices in higher education are falling under more scrutiny, colleges and universities are finding themselves focusing more of their efforts on measurable variables including retention and graduation rates.• Students who end up on probation are less likely to be retained and graduate as compared to students who remain in good academic standing (Mathies, Gardner, & Bauer, 2006).• “Low-hanging fruit” 4Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Probation students within NCAS and UC-NPrior to 2010:•Retention rate of 67% (overall student retention rate was 82.7%)•360 students on probation, we potentially lost 120 students•@ $12,775 per student (per year, in-state tuition), RU-N lost over $1.5million dollars•What could we do with $1.5 million? 5Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Past Practices• Students on probation have long been an overlooked population• Few efforts and resources were used• Sent letters• Students were “required” to attend a “Probation Workshop”• Not enough flexibility for non-traditional 6Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013What are the current criteria for academic probation 1. A cumulative grade-point average (G.P.A.) of less than 2.000 or 2. Two consecutive terms of a grade-point average (G.P.A.) of less than 2.000 Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Additions to academic probation criteria3. failure to complete 60% of attempted credits4. failure to enroll in a composition or mathematics course, as prescribed by the placement standards at the college and prior course history, and continue to enroll each and every term until the requirement is satisfied5. failure to complete successfully any course after three attempts, including those for which W grades are received.Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Spring 2010• Given the task of working on probation• Assessed the challenges – Identification - technology – Accuracy of data – 88% accurate - time frame for data uploads, repeat policies and procedures, temporary grades, and late rosters – Enforcement – Student body – commuters, jobs – Office priority• Work more closely with IR to better identify these students 9Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Fall 2010• Established a Probation Student taskforce• “Probation Workshop” to “Academic Success Workshops”• Changed the format so that each workshop consisted of academic and non- academic components in collaboration with other departments (Learning Center, Psychological Services, Career Development Center) – Topics include Time Management, Note-taking skills, etc.• Survey: – evaluation of the workshop – evaluate all and any areas that may be of particular need for the students 10Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Spring 2011• Piloted an intervention aimed at students on probation following their first semester of enrollment (freshmen and transfer).• 170 students second semester freshman and transfer on probation• Selected a group of 54 (32%) were placed on an “academic success agreement”. 11Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Academic Success Agreement• Must meet with advisor 3 times – Prior to the start of the semester – The week after add/drop – Prior to next semester’s registration (before last W date)• Must meet with each professor during the semester• Must complete questionnaire• May not register for more than 13 credits• Must attend a workshop• Agreement must be turned in prior to the end of the semester (before finals)• Failure to complete the agreement may result in further academic restraints (e.g. academic contract, reduced credit load)Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Spring 2011 Intervention Results 13Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Spring 2011 Intervention Results 14Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Spring 2011 Intervention Results 15Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Feedback• Intervention is good!• 3 meetings for 54 students was a lot… maybe scale back – Less intervention for more students• Mandatory meeting with faculty member did not go over well• Need a point person for probation initiatives 16Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Fall 2011Academic ProbationRequirements Developments• 13 credit limitation • Launched online version• 1 mandatory meeting with of academic probation academic advisor workshop using Camtasia o prior to Spring 2012 Studio Video Editing registration Software• 1 academic probation • Developed online quiz workshop o academic and non- academic components• Continued academic agreementsHelping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 17
  • NACADA 3-2013 Spring 2012Academic ProbationRequirements Developments• 13 credit limitation • New leadership• Academic probation • Use of academic workshop contracts for re-enrolled o Academic and non-academic students and others (per components advisor discretion)• 2 mandatory visits with • Increased advisor academic advisor meeting requirements o mid semester and prior to fall 2012 registrationHelping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 18
  • NACADA 3-2013 19Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Fall 2012Academic ProbationRequirements Developments• 14 credit limitation • Blackboard• 2 academic probation • Increased credit limit from workshops 13 to 14 • Academic and non-academic • Expanded workshop• 3 mandatory visits with requirements academic advisor o OAS Academic Success• Academic contracts (academic) o RU Ready to Succeed? (reenrollments and as per advisor discretion) (non-academic) • Early registrationHelping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 20
  • NACADA 3-2013 21Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Spring 2013Academic ProbationRequirements Developments• Monitor Blackboard • Piloted Academic Success• 2 Academic probation online course for I-L workshops population only • RU Ready to Succeed? – Extension of advising • OAS Academic Success – Additional requirements for this group of students• 3 mandatory visits with academic advisor o Beginning of semester o Mid semester o Prior to fall 2013 registration (early registration)Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 22
  • NACADA 3-2013 Development of Academic Success course• Why?• Theoretical Influences – Developmental – Intrusive – Prescriptive – Learning-Centered – Appreciative InquiryHelping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 23
  • NACADA 3-2013 Development of Academic Success (online) course•Why online? – Scheduling – Technology – Groups•How did we develop an academically sound pedagogicallyappropriate online course? 24Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013CONSIDERATIONS:1.Student2.Interaction3.Content Retrieve from Flickr by ted_majorHelping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 25
  • NACADA 3-2013 Retrieved from Flickr by Larry Miller Unique Advising ToolHelping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 26
  • NACADA 3-2013 Design Retrieved from Flickr by Will ScullinHelping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 27
  • NACADA 3-2013Course MenuHelping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 28
  • NACADA 3-2013Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 29
  • NACADA 3-2013Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 30
  • NACADA 3-2013Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 31
  • NACADA 3-2013Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed 32
  • NACADA 3-2013 Results (so far…)• Better interaction with students• More in-depth information• Advisor meetings are more productive 33Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Student Assignment: Advisor Meeting Summary & Plan 1“I met with my advisor…I explained to her that the reason why I am onprobation is because last semester I was under a lot of stress. I was workingfull time along with volunteering at the local hospital and then also trying to dogood in school…After having this meeting with her all of my questions arenow answered and Im glad she made everything very clear to me andnow i can go on and fix my mistakes i have made last semester….Thereason I was not able to excel was because my work hours were not going wellwith my college course hours…I would either not make it to class and if i didthen i wasnt able to concentrate because i would be so tired. Also i do live 45minutes away from the university so the commuting was difficult as well…i amworking less…now i made my work schedule and college schedule mucheasier. I gave myself time to get enough sleep and be able to wake up in themornings and make it to my early 8:30 class. Also I only work part time now…Hopefully things will be different this semester and with this change i can domuch better and get off probation.”- K.K. 34Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Student Assignment: Advisor Meeting Summary & Plan 2“Today I met with my assigned adviser for my second meeting…I waswell prepared before walking into the office. My three mainconcerns were that how I can raise my GPA, questions about theacademic success class online, and about changing my major…Shehelp me calculate my minimum GPA that I would need for the semesterto raise my GPA and to get off probation. Then she told me about how Ineed to do the academic success class… After she finished explainingto me about the course, she asked me what I thought about the course.I told her that I really liked the course and that I felt it wasmotivating me to do better…Overall my experience with her wasgreat. I loved talking to her and I loved that she really helped meout…She motivated me and made me gather faith in myself that Ican do better in the subjects I want.”- S.K. 35Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Student Assignment: Advisor Meeting Summary & Plan 2“…I just met with Ms. Allen...She didnt seem too thrilled because of the e-mail that DeanSanders sent to me a few days ago. The e-mail basically said that I have failed to meetall requirements of the Probation class up until now…I have nobody else to blame butmyself because I never read the syllabus for the course. I didnt know that there werejournal entries and other assignments that were due for this class, simply because I didnot read the instructions. There are no excuses for my actions…I have reallydisciplined myself, and I dont feel lazy or weak minded like I did last semester. Ifeel like a whole new individual and it feels good. The action plan is so far still thesame. Keep going to class, manage my time properly, study well and overall just stay ontop of everything. I feel like I am maturing already because I already passed a "hardweek" in the semester. A week that I would have normally just given up on all myschoolwork, but instead this time I buckled down and hit the books. I realized that Ihavent dug myself into a hole, I just hit a speed bump last semester on the long andwinding road of my life. So theres no reason for me to feel depressed or upset aboutwhere I currently stand. I CAN turn things around and it wont be easy but if I justsurround myself with people who provide me with the support to instill thatmotivation within myself, I can keep climbing higher…”- A.K. 36Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Student Assignment: RU Ready to Succeed? Workshop Reflective Journal“The things I learned…are things that I was missing when itcame to my school work. I learned that I need to believe inmyself in order to be successful. My reason for being in schooland wanting a degree should be something that I want, not whatmy parents want for me…The one thing that I took from theworkshop is that I have to know what I want regarding myeducation. My reasons for being in school have to be my ownpersonal reasons. I have to be motivated in succeeding so Idont fail. But if I do fail, then I am motivated to keeppushing towards to my goal. The overall thing that I learnedis that I have to believe in myself in order to see myselfsucceed.”- D.J. 37Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Current probation data• 98% of the students are compliant• 13% reduction for students on probation• 21% reduction in dismissed students (approximately 30 students) – 30 students x $12,755 (yearly in state tuition) = $382,650 38Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • NACADA 3-2013 Next Steps• If continued success, the course could become a mandated requirement for all students on probation.• Revenue from the increase in student retention could then be used to increase staff, resources, programs, etc.• This course (content, design, resources, and modality) can be used by other colleges and universities.• Use this model for other purposes (freshman seminar, transfers, senior seminar)• Examine other at-risk populations (“high hanging fruit”) 39Helping Students on Academic Probation to Persist and Succeed
  • Questions 40
  • THANKS Robert M. Kurland rkurland@rutgers.edu (973)353-5099 Dijha R. Allen Dijha@rutgers.edu (973)353-5132 Shelley C. Kurland skurland@ccm.edu (973)328-5538You can access this presentation at: http://www.slideshare.net/skurland/nacada-conference-320132