CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 5The real value of moneyWith international efforts to avert recessi...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 6                                   Today and yesterday            ...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 7    By the last couple of decades, developed              Inflatio...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 8                                         Investors do not like to ...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 9Inflation-beating versus inflation-hedging                 been a ...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 10                                                  This scatterplo...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 11Table 2                                                          ...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 12                                         abilities have increased...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 13entire 112 years, however, the annualized real            that sh...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 14                              We find that, after controlling for...
CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 15interest rate fluctuates to reflect news about infla-tion, and so...
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012
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Credit suisse global_investment_returns_yearbook_2012

  1. 1. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 5The real value of moneyWith international efforts to avert recession, fears have grown about the brunt ofmonetary policy and debt overhang. Sentiment fluctuates between deflationaryconcerns and inflationary fears, and the demand for safe-haven assets hassurged. This article examines the dynamics and impact of inflation, and investi-gates how equities and bonds have performed under different inflationary condi-tions. We search for hedges against inflation and deflation, and draw a compari-son with other assets that may provide protection against changes in the realvalue of money.Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh and Mike Staunton, London Business SchoolAs 2012 dawned, inflation-linked bonds issued by fall in the general price level, so that the real valueBritain, the USA, Canada and several other low-risk of money rises. For those who are worried aboutsovereigns sold at a real yield that was negative or this scenario perhaps a replay of the Japaneseat best less than 1%. Investors had become so experience over the last two decades whichkeen on safe-haven securities that they had bid investments might offer some protection againstlow-risk bonds up to a level at which their real the turbulence of deflation?return was close to zero. We examine how equities and bonds have per- formed under different inflation regimes over 112Inflation and deflation years and in 19 different countries. We investigate the extent to which excessively low or high rates ofInflation refers to a rise in the general price level, so inflation are harmful. We ask whether equitiesthat the real value of money its purchasing power should now be regarded as under threat from infla- falls. In the recent global turmoil, investors have tion, or whether they are a hedge against inflation.asked whether unconventional monetary policy and We compare equities and bonds with gold, prop-attempts at solving the euro crisis might create erty, and housing as potential providers of moreinflationary pressures. At the same time, there is stable real returns.the worry that some emerging markets will experi- We conclude that while equities may offer limitedence overheating, with the accompanying danger of protection against inflation, they are most influ-inflation. If inflation is the primary concern, which enced by other sources of volatility. Second, bondsassets can provide some expectation of a favorable have a special role as a hedge against deflation.real return, even in inflationary times? Third, commercial real estate has been a somewhat Yet, in an economic environment that may be disappointing hedge, inferior to domestic housing.worse than anything the developed world has seen Last, we note that inflation-hedging strategies cansince the 1930s, investors are also asking whether be unreliable out of sample.an extended recession might lead to depressionand deflation in major markets. Deflation refers to a
  2. 2. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 6 Today and yesterday 1920s. By the end of 1920, the price level had risen to 2.64 from its start-1900 level of 1.0. Dur- Investors care about what the dollars they earn ing the subsequent deflation, the price level fell to from an investment will buy. Figure 1 gives a dec- 1.78 in 1933, a third lower than in 1920, and it ade-by-decade snapshot of US price levels. It then took until 1947 for prices to rise back to their shows that a dollar in 1900 had the same purchas- end-1920 level. ing power as USD 26.3 today. The bars portray the Was the US deflation of the early 20th century corresponding decline in purchasing power: one an anomaly in economic history? As noted by dollar today represents the same real value as 3.8 Reinhart and Rogoff (2011), the long-term histori- cents in 1900. cal record, spanning multiple centuries, is in fact The chart also shows that there were periods of one of inflation alternating with deflation, but with deflation, with purchasing power rising during the no more than a slight inflationary bias until the 20th century. Figure 1 In Figure 2, we display annual changes in British price levels since 1265. While pre-1900 inflation Consumer price inflation in the United States, 1900–2012 indexes are admittedly poor in quality and narrow in coverage, Britain’s comparatively low long-term Source: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton, Triumph of the Optimists; authors’ updates rate of inflation, punctuated with deflations, re- minds us that sustained high rates of inflation are US cents US price level largely a 20th century phenomenon. Towards the 100 26.3 right of the chart, note the frequency of upward 100 91 25 (inflationary) and absence of downward (deflation- 25.2 ary) observations for the United Kingdom. Sus- 80 20 tained price increases were not prevalent until the 19.6 1900s. 61 60 14.7 15 Around the world 50 45 36 For each of the 19 Yearbook countries, Figure 3 40 10 29 9.0 displays annualized inflation rates over 23 1900−2011. Annual inflation hit a maximum of 20 2.8 3.4 11.2 5 361% in Japan (1946), 344% in Italy (1944); 2.2 2.0 1.6 4.4 1.0 1.1 6.8 5.1 4.0 3.8 241% in Finland (1918), and 65% in France 0 0 (1946). For display purposes, the chart omits 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2012 1922−23 for Germany, where annual inflation reached 209 billion percent (1923), and where Purchasing power in cents of an investment in 1900 of 1 USD Rising prices in the USA monthly inflation reached 30 thousand percent (October 1923). Hyperinflations are often defined as a price-level Figure 2 increase of at least 50% in a month. Mostly, they occurred during the monetary chaos that followed Annual inflation rates in the United Kingdom, 1265–2011 the two world wars and the collapse of commu- Source: Officer and Williamson (2011) nism. Looking beyond the Yearbook countries, Hanke and Kwok (2009) report that monthly infla- Rate of inflation (%) tion peaked in Yugoslavia at 313 million per-cent (January 1994), in Zimbabwe at 80 billion percent (November 2008), and in Hungary at 42 quintillion percent (July 1946). Prior to the 20th century, 40 there was one hyperinflation; during the 20th cen- tury there were 28; and in the 21st century, just one (Zimbabwe). 20 Apart from a few exceptional episodes, inflation rates were not high in the 19 Yearbook countries. The median annual inflation rate across all countries 0 and all years was just 2.8%, and the mean (ex- Germany 1922–23) was 5.3%. Nevertheless, in one quarter of all observations, the inflation rate -20 was at least 6.4%, and during 22 individual years (1915–20, 1940–42, 1951, and 1972–83) a majority of the 19 economies experienced inflation -40 of at least 6.4%. More details on inflation in our 19 1265 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 1900 2000 nations are included in the 2012 Sourcebook.
  3. 3. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 7 By the last couple of decades, developed Inflation riskeconomies had largely tamed inflation. In each yearsince 1992, almost every Yearbook country had Despite the experience of both inflation and defla-inflation below 6%. The exception was South Af- tion, price fluctuations are a persistent phenome-rica, which in 12 of the last 20 years had inflation non. Over the full 112 years, there is a high corre-of over 6%. lation between each year’s inflation rate and the South Africa is in fact one of a number of preceding year’s rate. Across the 19 Yearbookemerging markets that suffered higher inflation at countries, the serial correlation of annual inflationsome point. Figure 4 portrays the range of inflation rates averages 0.56. Following extreme pricerates experienced since 1970 by a larger sample of rises, inflation is also more volatile. This amplifies83 countries. The upper bars (and the left-hand the desire to hedge against a sharp acceleration inaxis) report the highest annual inflation rate for inflation, or against the advent of deflation.each of the 83 countries, and the down-ward bars(and the right-hand axis) report the most extreme Figure 3deflation (if there was deflation) in each country. Over recent decades, extreme moves in price Annual inflation rates in the Yearbook countries, 1900–2011levels have occurred more frequently in emergingmarkets than in developed markets. Long after Source: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton, Triumph of the Optimists; authors’ updatesinflation was tamed in developed markets, inflation Mean rate of inflation (%) Standard deviation of inflation (%)− and to a lesser extent, deflation − persisted in 42 20 40corners of the worldwide economy where therewere on average worse institutions and less market 35discipline. 15 30Deflation and depression 27 10.8 10.3High and accelerating rates of inflation are typically 10 9.0 20associated with poor conditions in the real econ- 7.8omy, and jumps in inflation are likely to have an 15 6.0adverse impact on stock market investments. Disin- 5.6 5.2 5.7 12 4.5flation − a slowdown in the inflation rate during 5 3.8 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.1 4.2 9 10 3.0 3.1 3.1 7 7 7 2.4 7 7which inflation declined to lower levels − has 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 7tended to coincide with favorable economic growth. 2.3 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.9 4.0 4.2 4.8 4.9 5.3 5.8 6.9 7.2 7.3 8.4But while disinflation after a previous period of high 0 0 Swi Net US Can Swe Nor NZ Aus Den UK Ire Ger SAf Bel Spa Jap Fra Fin Itainflation is a good thing, deflationary conditions – inwhich the level of consumer prices falls – are asso- Arithmetic mean (LHS, %) Geometric mean (LHS, %) Standard deviation (RHS, %)ciated with recession. During periods of deflation,economies tend to suffer. While inflation reduces the real value of moneyover time, deflation can also be harmful. A declinein consumer prices is a danger to an economy Figure 4because of the prospect of a deflationary spiral, Extremes of inflation and deflation: 83 countries, 1970–2011high real interest rates, recession, and depression.Deflation has afflicted many countries at some Source: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton; Hanke and Kwok (2009)point, the most cited examples being America’sGreat Depression of the early 1930s, the Japanese Inflation rate (%) Deflation rate (%)deflation from the early 1990s to the present day, 8 9,700, 000,00 0,000, 000,00 0,000%and Hong Kong’s post-Asian crisis deflation andslump from late 1997 till late 2004. Clearly, over the last 112 years, consumer prices 10000 10did not increase uniformly in the 19 Yearbookcountries. In 284 out of the 2,128 country-year 5000 5observations, consumer prices actually fell. In onequarter of all observations, inflation was less than1.09% − quite close to deflationary conditions. 0 0 B ul P hi Ta i N ig Svn Le b Ve n Ec u Ic e Ma u Hu n In d I re Tu n Mor Bra Pa k Sp a It a Th a Oma Es t La t B ot N et Qat Ne w K uw Ru s Mly s Au s Me x Egy Lu x CdI USIndeed, since 1900, every Yearbook country has Pol C hi C ol S ri Tri Bel Ma l Sw i Zim Ro m Ja m Nam Ar g C ro B an Ind o Ke n Ira n Cze Sau G re C hn Sin Ba h J ap Hon So u Fin Cyp De n Sw e Ca n U kr Pe r Isr Tu r Po r K or Jo r No r Ge r G ha Slvk Fra Lit Au t UK lexperienced deflation in at least eight years (NewZealand) and in as many as 25 years (Japan). In 24 -5000 -5individual years (1901–05, 1907–10, 1921–23,1925–34, 1953, 2009) a majority of Yearbook -19.2 %countries suffered deflation. -10000 -10 Highest annual inflation 1970–2011 (LHS) Lowest annual deflation 1970–2011 (RHS)
  4. 4. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 8 Investors do not like to be exposed to volatility, tenth of historical outcomes, to most investors such and the persistence of volatility makes this all the acute scenarios seem exceptionally improbable in more undesirable. As we show later, they can the foreseeable future. However, the extremes of therefore be expected to pay less for securities at history do help us to understand how financial times of high inflation, which should enhance the assets have responded to large shifts in the general rewards from investing undertaken at such times. level of prices. In the 2011 edition of the Yearbook, we showed that, though risky, buying bonds after years of Returns in differing conditions extreme realized rates of inflation was in fact re- warded by higher long-run real rates of return. The bars in Figure 5 are the average real returns Chapter 2 of this year’s publication reveals a similar on bonds and on equities in each of these groups. pattern in relation to investing after a period of For example, the first bar indicates that, during currency turmoil. years in which a country suffered deflation more To gain insight into the impact of inflation, in extreme than 3.5%, the real return on bonds Figure 5 we study the full range of 19 countries for averaged +20.2%. All returns include reinvested which we have a complete 112-year investment income and are adjusted for local inflation. history. We compare investment returns with infla- As one would expect, and as documented in tion in the same year. last year’s Yearbook, the average real return from Out of 2,128 country-year observations, we bonds varies inversely with contemporaneous identify those with the lowest 5% of inflation rates inflation. In fact, in the lowest 1% of years in our (that is, with very marked deflation), the next lowest sample, when deflation was between –26% and 15% (which experienced limited deflation or stable 11.8%, bonds provided an average real return of prices), the next 15% (which had inflation of up to +36% (not shown in the chart). Needless to say, 1.9%), and the following 15%; these four groups in periods of high inflation, real bond returns were represent half of our observations, all of which particularly poor. As an asset class, bonds suffer experienced inflation of 2.8% or less. in inflation, but they provide a hedge against de- At the other extreme, we identify the country- flation. year observations with the top 5% of inflation rates, During marked deflation (in the chart, rates of the next highest 15% (which still experienced infla- deflation more extreme than –3.5%), equities tion above 8%), the next 15% (which had rates of gave a real return of 11.2%, dramatically under- inflation of 4.5% 8%), and the remaining 15%; performing the real return on bonds of 20.2% these four groups represent the other half of our (see the left of Figure 5). Over all other intervals observations, all of which experienced inflation portrayed in the chart, equities gave a higher real above 2.8%. In Figure 5, we plot the lowest infla- return than bonds, averaging a premium relative to tion rate of each group as a light blue square. bonds of more than 5%. During marked inflation, Note that in 5% of cases, deflation was more equities gave a real return of 12.0%, dramati- severe than 3.5% and in 5% of cases inflation cally outperforming the bond return of 23.2% exceeded +18.3%. Although they represent a (see the right of the chart). Though harmed by inflation, equities were resilient compared to Figure 5 bonds. Perhaps surprisingly, during severe deflation Real bond and equity returns vs. inflation rates, 1900–2011 real equity returns were only a little lower than at times of slight deflation or stable prices. The ex- Source: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton planation lies in the clustering of dates in the tails of the distribution of inflation. Of the 1% of years Rate of return/inflation (%) that were the most deflationary, all but three oc- 20 curred in 1921 or 1922. In those observations, 18 20.2 the average equity return was 2% nominal, equating to +19% real. Omitting those ultra- 10 11.9 11.2 11.4 10.8 8 .0 deflationary years from the lowest 5% of observa- 6.8 5.2 7.0 2.9 4.5 5.2 tions, the real equity return during serious defla- 3.4 1.9 2.8 0 0.6 1.8 tion would have averaged +9%. -4.6 -3.5 Overall, it is clear that equities performed espe- -10 -12.0 cially well in real terms when inflation ran at a low level. High inflation impaired real equity perform- ance, and deflation was associated with deep -20 -23.2 disappointment compared to government bonds. -2 6 Historically, when inflation has been low, the -30 average realized real equity returns have been Low 5% Next 15% Next 15% Next 15% Next 15% Next 15% Next 15% Top 5% high, greater than on government bonds, and very Percentiles of inflation across 2128 country-years similar across the different low inflation groupings Rea l bond returns (%) Real equity returns (%) Inflat io n rate of at least (%) shown in Figure 5.
  5. 5. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 9Inflation-beating versus inflation-hedging been a leap in inflation equities have performed less well in real terms. These sharp jumps in inflation areWe draw a distinction between an inflation-beating dangerous for investors.strategy and an inflation-hedging strategy. The To provide a perspective on the negative relationformer is a strategy which achieved (or, depending between inflation and stock prices, Figure 6 showson the context, is expected to achieve) a return in the annual inflation rate for the United States ac-excess of inflation. This superior performance may companied by the real capital value of the US eq-be a reward for exposure to risk that has little or uity index from 1900 to date. Inflationary conditionsnothing to do with inflation. were associated with relatively low stock prices An inflation-hedging strategy is one that provides during World War I and World War II and their af-higher nominal returns when inflation is high. Con- termaths, and the 1970s energy crisis. The declineditional on high inflation, the realized nominal re- in inflation during the 1990s coincided with a sharpturns of an inflation-hedging strategy should be rise in the real equity index. Nevertheless, the cor-larger than in periods during which inflation runs at relation between the series is only mildly negativea more moderate level. However, the long-run and so this relationship must be interpreted withperformance of an inflation-hedging strategy may caution.nevertheless be low. The distinction is between a high ex-post return Equities and inflationand a high ex-ante correlation between nominalreturns and inflation. This difference is often mis- There is in fact an extensive literature which indi-understood. For example, it is widely believed that cates that equities are not particularly good inflationcommon stocks must be a good hedge against hedges. Fama and Schwert (1977), Fama (1981),inflation to the extent that they have had long-run and Boudoukh and Richardson (1993) are threereturns that were ahead of inflation. But their high classic papers, and Tatom (2011) is a useful reviewex-post return is better explained as a large equity article. The negative correlation between inflationrisk premium. The magnitude of the equity risk and stock prices is cited by Tatom as one of thepremium tells us nothing about the correlation most commonly accepted empirical facts in financialbetween equity returns and inflation. and monetary economics. On the other hand, gold might be proposed as a Figure 7 is an example of the underlying rela-hedge against inflation, insofar as it is believed to tionship between the equity market and contempo-appreciate when inflation is rampant. Yet, as we raneous inflation. The chart pools all 19 countriesshall see, gold has given a far lower long-term and all 112 years in one scatterplot (omitting fromreturn than equities, and for that reason it is unlikely the chart a handful of observations that are toothat institutions seeking a worthwhile long-term real extreme to plot). Charts for bonds and variationsreturn will invest heavily in gold. based on other investment horizons are omitted to conserve space.Inflation hedgingThe search for an inflation-hedging investmenttherefore differs from a search for assets that have Figure 6realized a return well above inflation. It also differsfrom a search for a deflation-hedging investment. Inflation and the real level of US equities, 1900–2011This is because, if inflation expectations decline Source: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton,(i.e. if disinflation or even deflation lies ahead),inflation-hedging assets are likely to underperform. Inflation rate (%) Real capital gains index (log scale) There is a price one should expect to pay for “in-suring” against inflation. The cost of insuring should 20 10be a lower average investment return in deflationaryenvironments and/or in average conditions. As we have noted, conventional bonds cannot 10be a hedge against inflation: they provide a hedgeagainst deflation. Equities, however, being a claimon the real economy, could be portrayed as ahedge against inflation. The hope would be that 0 1their nominal, or monetary, return would be higher 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010when consumer prices rise. If equities were to 1 Januaryprovide a complete hedge against inflation, theirreal, inflation-adjusted, return would be -10uncorrelated with consumer prices. However, equities have not behaved like that.When inflation has been moderate and stable, not Inflation rate (LHS, %) Real capital gain (log scale, RHS)fluctuating markedly from year to year, equities -20 0have performed relatively well. When there has
  6. 6. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 10 This scatterplot has three noteworthy features. Table 1 First, there is an indication of a slight downward Real return vs. inflation, 1900–2011 slope, meaning that, across markets and time, Regressions of annual real return versus same-year inflation. There is a higher inflation rates tend to be associated with dummy variable for every country, the intercept is suppressed, and five lower real equity returns. Second, there is a diver- extreme observations are omitted. Source: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton, IPD, WGC, and OECD gence between the average returns achieved over the long run in different markets. Third, there is a Asset Coefficient Std Error t-statistic No of obs. tremendous degree of return variation that is unre- Equities –0.52 0.05 –10.60 2123 lated to inflation, reflecting the substantial volatility Bonds –0.74 0.02 –35.23 2123 of equity returns. Bills –0.62 0.01 –70.54 2123 To quantify the relationship, we follow Bekaert Gold 0.26 0.05 5.00 2123 and Wang (2010) in running regressions of real Real –0.33 0.20 –1.60 280 investment returns on inflation. We use country Housing –0.20 0.07 –2.99 719 fixed effects to account for the differing long-term stock market performance of each country. (In our We are estimating a relationship between real analysis, year fixed effects would be inappropriate returns and inflation. Inflation therefore appears in because we are interested in how returns respond the regression both as an independent variable to year-by-year inflation). Altogether, there are 112 and (indirectly) as a component of the dependant years of data for 19 countries. The base case variable. This can reduce the magnitude of the regressions exclude the five most extreme observa- estimated coefficients, so the partial hedge indi- tions of inflation, which are all in excess of 200% cated by the first row of Table 1 may understate (Germany 1922 23, Finland 1918, Italy 1944, and the hedging ability of the assets in Table 1. Japan 1946). Importantly, the negative relation between infla- The first row of Table 1 shows the contempora- tion and equity returns should not be interpreted as neous relationship between inflation and real equity a trading rule. It cannot predict when equities are returns. When inflation rates are high, real invest- unattractive. This is because at the start of each ment returns tend to be lower. A rate of inflation year we would need the forthcoming inflation rate that is 10% higher is associated, other factors held to decide whether to sell out of equities. Unless we constant, with a real equity return that is lower by are blessed with clairvoyance, we cannot derive a 5.2%. So equities are at best a partial hedge prediction from future inflation against inflation: their nominal returns tend to be Our regressions in Table 1 omit Germany for higher during inflation, but not by a large enough 1922 23 and three other observations with infla- margin to ensure that real returns completely resist tion over 200%. If we reinstate these three coun- inflation. tries, the coefficient on equities moves from 0.52 to 0.35. That is, equities appear to have held their real value better when we incorporate these ex- treme years in our sample. The dilemma for inves- tors is whether we learn more from extreme outliers Figure 7 or whether those are truly unique, non-repeatable episodes. In summary, high inflation reduces equity One-year real equity return vs. concurrent inflation, 1900– values. 2011 Source: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton Bonds and inflation Real equity return In the second row of Table 1, we see that a rate of 150% inflation that is 10% higher is associated, at the margin, with a real bond return that is lower by 7.4%. Over and above their smaller average return, 100% the performance of bonds is impaired by inflation more than equities are. There is clearly a tendency for real bond returns to be lower when the invest- 50% ment is held over a high-inflation year. This pattern is also evident when performance is measured over a multi-year horizon (not reported here). As we 0% showed in the 2011 Yearbook, the reduction in bond value also generates higher subsequent re- -50% turns, on average, for those who invest after a bout of inflation and hold for the long term. What happens, then, if an investor buys stocks -100% or bonds after a period of inflation? The first two Inflation in prior year -30% 0% 30% 60% 90% rows of Table 2 provide an answer: the extent to UK US Ger Jap Net Fra Ita Swi Aus Can Swe Den Spa Bel Ire SAf Nor NZ Fin which returns are reduced by prior-year inflation is
  7. 7. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 11Table 2 environment, credit risk may be heightened, and soReal return vs. prior inflation 1900–2011 spreads for defaultable bonds may widen. There could be three perils for bond investors: nominalRegressions of annual real return versus prior-year inflation. There is adummy variable for every country, the intercept is suppressed, and five interest rates, real interest rate risk, and credit risk.extreme observations are omitted. Source: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Compared to bonds, equities are better inflation-Mike Staunton, IPD, WGC, and OECD hedging assets, though their real returns are still adversely affected by inflation. These properties ofAsset Coefficient Std Error t-statistic No of obs equities are most evident during historically extremeEquities –0.31 0.05 –6.19 2104 episodes. Yet, as Figure 5 highlighted earlier, inBonds –0.41 0.03 –15.89 2104 conditions of moderate inflation, asset returns areBills –0.37 0.01 –24.74 2104 relatively unaffected by the scale of inflation. At theGold –0.07 0.05 –1.48 2104 same time, as we saw in Figure 7, national stockReal estate –0.54 0.20 –2.72 280 markets are buffeted by factors beyond inflation.Housing –0.37 0.07 –5.63 719 For that reason, it is wise for investors to look for inflation protection beyond just equities.almost half of the impact of contemporaneousinflation. A rate of inflation that is 10% higher is Inflation-linked bondsassociated, other factors held constant, with a realequity return that is lower by 3.1% in the subse- What other assets might provide an effective hedgequent year, and with a real bond return that is lower against inflation? A leading real asset category isby 4.1% in the subsequent year. The continuing inflation-indexed bonds, notably those issued bynegative impact on equity and bond prices reflects governments. For indexed bonds that are held tothe serial correlation of inflation rates. maturity, there is not the same need to interrogate This is not a market timing tool. High inflation history, since the real yield on these securities pro-may look like a sell signal, but our model is derived vides a forward-looking statement of the inflation-with hindsight and could not be known in advance; adjusted yield to maturity (of course, over intermedi-there is clustering of observations, so many of the ate horizons, when there is real interest rate risk,signals may occur at some past date (e.g. the inflation-linked bonds can also be risky investments).1920s); and it is not clear where sales proceeds Figure 8 displays the real yields at which repre-should be parked. In particular, real interest rates sentative inflation-linked bonds with a maturitytend to be lower in inflationary times, the expected close to 10 years were trading. We draw compari-real return on Treasury bills will be smaller after an son between the real yields at the end of 2011 andinflation hit, and other safe-haven assets like infla- at the start of 2011 (i.e. the closing yield for 2010).tion-linked bonds are likely to provide a reduced As investors fled to safety during the banking crisis,expected return in real terms. real yields had already declined prior to 2011, but Furthermore, high inflation rates may coincide over that year they fell further. The only countrieswith greater volatility of real returns. As we showed that have not recently experienced a further tight-in the 2011 Yearbook in the context of bond in- ening of real yields are those where default prob-vestment, inflation lowers prices to the point thatforward-looking returns provide compensation for Figure 8higher risk exposure. A risk-tolerant investor willsee security prices fall when inflation and the risk Change in inflation-linked government bond yields over 2011premium rises, and can then take advantage ofhigher projected returns. Source: FT table of representative stocks (UK ’21, US ‘28/’31, Canada ’21, Sweden ‘20/’22, France ’20). Deflation is good for bondholders, but the impacton stockholders is less obvious. To illustrate this, Real yield for representative 10-year index-linked bond (%)we divide our sample into years when there is infla-tion, and years when price changes are zero or 1.50 1.68negative – deflationary years. A regression likeTable 1, but based solely on data for deflationary 1.35 1. 34years, yields coefficients of –0.07 for equities and – 1.00 1.091.88 for bonds. Broadly speaking, the real value of .93equities is uncorrelated with the magnitude of de- .65flation. Once in a deflationary environment, how- .50ever, bonds tend to lose 1.88% for every 1% risein consumer prices. They gain a further 1.88% for .15every 1% decline in consumer prices. .00 -0.1 0 -0. 07 Bonds come into their own during periods of dis-inflation and deflation. But they can be dangerous -.44 -.50during inflation. If inflation and hence nominal inter- UK USA Cana da Sw eden Franceest rates rise, bond prices must decline. When Yield on 30 December 2011 (%) Yield on 31 December 2010 (%)inflation is rampant, uncertainty about real bondyields may increase. Finally, in a more inflationary
  8. 8. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 12 abilities have increased. An example is France (in Gold and cash Figure 8) or Italy (whose ‘23 bond at end-2011 offered a real yield of 5.61%). Gold is an investment puzzle. At times it has de- By historical standards, real yields are today ex- fined the value of major currencies. Yet it is a com- traordinarily low, being close to or below zero for modity, offering protection against inflation. Physi- default-free inflation-linked bonds. As a safe haven cal gold is a real asset. In dramatic contrast to for investors concerned with the purchasing power stocks, bonds, and bills, gold is not a counter- of their portfolio, index-linked bonds offer a highly party’s liability. At times of uncertainty, investors effective means of reducing real risk. In today’s may turn to gold as a hedge against crises. market, however, they can make little contribution But how well does gold provide stability of pur- to achieving a positive real return over the period chasing power? If it were a reliable hedge against from investment to maturity. inflation, its real price would be relatively unwaver- ing. Gold’s real value is shown in the line, plotted to a logarithmic scale, in Figure 9. Charts such as thisFigure 9 can be produced for any currency (the data areGold prices and inflation in the United Kingdom, 1900–2011 freely available on the World Gold Council’s web- site). Here we take a GBP perspective.Source: Christophe Spaenjers; Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton; WGC, EH.net The purchasing power of gold has fluctuated over a wide range. The gray shading denotes the UK inflation / gold return (%) GBP gold price (log scale) era of the gold standard and of the fixed GBP-USD 80 108% - exchange rate while the US dollar was pegged to Gold Gold GBP pegged to USD gold. In that period, the price of gold was fixed in standard stnd and so to gold price nominal terms, so it failed to serve as an inflation 60 3.29 hedge except at rare instances of currency revalua- tion. 40 But even during the floating periods, gold was volatile. It lost some three-quarters of its real GBP 20 value (and over four-fifths of its real USD value) between the 1980 peak and 2001. While gold 0 may play a role in a diversified portfolio, it should be seen in part as a commodity, and only in part -20 as an investment that is driven by the desire of investors to protect themselves from financial -40 crises. 00 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 00 2010 In Figure 10, we report the investment per- Inflation rate (%) Nominal return on gold (%) Real gold price (RHS, log scale) formance of gold and cash over the 112-year span covered earlier. As in Figure 5, we analyze 2,128 Treasury bill returns and 2,128 gold re- turns, where gold is denominated in each coun-Figure 10 try’s local currency. Gold returns are of course price returns; returns are adjusted for local infla-Real gold and cash returns vs. inflation rates, 1900–2011 tion. The bars are the average inflation-adjustedSource: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton; WGC, EH.net. returns on gold and on cash (Treasury bills), so, for example, the first bar indicates that during Rate of return/inflation (%) years in which a country suffered deflation worse 20 than 3.5%, the real return on gold averaged 18 +12.2%, while the real return on cash averaged 14.8 +14.8%. 10 12.2 8.0 During marked deflation (rates more extreme 4.5 than –3.5%) gold gave a real return that was 2.9 2.6 4.3 3.7 0.6 2.4 2.6 1.9 1.8 1.4 2.8 4.4 inferior to cash and to bonds (cf. Figure 5). The 0 -3.5 -3.7 comparison with cash may be a little unfair. During deflationary episodes, cash generates large real -10 returns because nominal interest rates have usu- ally been non-negative (this contributes to the negative coefficients reported for Treasury bills in -21.4 -20 Tables 1 and 2). -26 In contrast, during extreme inflation, gold gave -30 a real return that was close to zero. Its average Low 5% Next 15% Next 15% Next 15% Next 15% Next 15% Next 15% Top 5% behavior was quite different over such periods Percentiles of inflation across 2128 country-years from cash, bonds and bills, even though gold was Real gold returns (%) Real bill returns (%) Inflation rate of at least (%) the only non-income producing asset. Over the
  9. 9. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 13entire 112 years, however, the annualized real that should be initiated because of a new concernreturn on gold (1.07% from a GBP perspective) about inflation risk.was of a similar magnitude to the capital apprecia- An appropriate role for commercial property in antion excluding dividend income achieved by institutional portfolio is as a diversifier and source ofequity markets around the world. returns, forming part of the core long-term holdings Gold is the only asset that does not have its of the investor. It is not possible for smaller institu-real value reduced by inflation (see Table 1). It has tions to gain exposure through direct investment toa potential role in the portfolio of a risk-averse the diversified portfolio represented by a propertyinvestor concerned about inflation. However, this index. While direct investment in this asset class isasset does not provide an income flow and has impractical for smaller investors, there are opportu-generated low real returns over the long term. nities for participating through pooled vehicles.Gold can fail to provide a positive real return overextended periods. Holdings in gold should there- Housingfore reflect the risk appetite and tastes of theinvestor. Gold is an individual investor’s asset; it For individual investors, the most prevalent directsits less easily in institutional portfolios. holding of real estate is their own home, so we turn now to personal investment in housing. We investi-Real estate gate the behavior of house prices in the Yearbook countries, using an OECD dataset that covers 18For investors concerned about the purchasing of the 19 Yearbook countries, the exception beingpower of their investments, a natural alternative to South Africa (see Bracke, 2011). The underlyingpublicly traded assets is a direct holding of real data is quarterly and, for consistency with our otherestate. Commercial property is a claim on assets research, we aggregate this to annual observationsthat might be expected to rise in monetary value of capital appreciation or depreciation. The indexesduring periods of general inflation. If real estate is for each country run from 1970 to 2010. Indexesan effective hedge against inflation, we would ex- for 2011 have not yet been released.pect the relationship between real returns and In contrast to the commercial property studiedinflation to be represented by a flat line. Needless above, the housing series measure capital valuesto say, there would still be substantial scatter since, with no adjustment for the rental value that mightas noted by Case and Wachter (2011), there are be imputed to domestic housing. In any given year,many factors beside inflation that influence the only a tiny proportion of the housing stock is trans-performance of a real estate portfolio. acted, indexes can be unrepresentative, and, as We examine the annual investment performance Monnery (2011) explains, there are many otherof commercial real estate using index series from problems with house price indexes. Our pooledthe Investment Property Databank (IPD). Country regressions relate real house-price movements tocoverage within IPD is not identical to the Year- local inflation, again using country fixed-effects.book, so we use all of the IPD index series exceptPortugal (not one of our 19 countries) and CentralEurope (not one of our 3 regions). For each countryin IPD’s annual dataset, we use unleveraged total Figure 11returns to directly held standing property invest-ments from one open market valuation to the next. Real price of domestic housing in six countries, 1900–2011The all-property total return, including income, is Sources: Eichholtz (1997), Eitrheim & Erlandsen (2004), Friggit (2010), Monnery (2011), Shiller (2011), Stapledon (2011)converted to real terms using the local inflationindex. Countries have between 7 and 41 years of House prices (inflation adjusted; log scale)data. Data for the most recent year is based on the 1000IPD monthly property index. 927 We analyze this dataset by running a regression 436of inflation-adjusted property returns on inflation, 366again with country fixed-effects. As reported in 286 280Table 1, we find that after controlling for countryspecific factors, the coefficient of real propertyreturns on inflation is –0.33. Real property returns 100 110appear to be hurt less by inflation than stocks,bonds, or bills. However, it is well known that real Averageestate values can lag traded assets, and Table 2 of all 6indicates that a rise in consumer prices is associ- seriesated with a delayed decline in real property valuesthat exceeds other assets. So, on balance, andgiven its relative illiquidity, commercial real estate 10has to be considered as a long-term commitment. 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010In contrast to traded assets, it is not an investment Netherla nds France Australia Norway USA UK
  10. 10. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 14 We find that, after controlling for country-specific Conclusion factors, the coefficient of real housing appreciation on inflation is –0.20 with a standard error of 0.07. Inflation erodes the value of most financial assets. Real house-price changes therefore seem relatively When inflation is high, equities are impacted, insensitive to inflation. This may reflect the fact that though to a lesser extent than bonds or cash. individual earnings (and hence mortgage capacity) However, equities also offer an expected reward tended to move in line with inflation, causing house that is larger than fixed income investments. prices to co-move with inflation; or it may reflect Table 3 summarizes the long-run performance other attributes of house prices that no longer apply and inflation sensitivity of those assets for which we in today’s conditions have a full 112-year returns history. Since the start We conclude with a record of housing prices of the 21st century, global equities have performed since 1900 for six countries, drawing on several best, with an annualized real return of 5.4%. As our studies of which Monnery (2011) is the most re- proxy for equities, we have taken the USD- cent. Housing has provided a long-term capital denominated world index, but details for all individ- appreciation that is similar in magnitude to gold. ual equity markets are in the Country Profiles sec- The best-performing house-price indexes are Aus- tion of this publication, starting on page 37. tralia (2.03% per year) and the United Kingdom In every country, local equities outperformed lo- (1.33%). The United States (0.09%) is the worst. cal government bonds and Treasury bills. Over the Norway (0.93%), the Netherlands (0.95%), and long term, bonds and bills have on average pro- France (1.18%) fall in the middle. vided investors with low – sometimes negative – House price indexes are notoriously difficult to real returns. We do not have comparably long-term interpret, but they do appear to have kept pace with data on inflation-linked bonds, but it is reasonable inflation over the long term. Nevertheless, one must to assume that default-free linkers offer a prospec- remember that a home is a consumption good, as tive reward that is, if anything, lower than conven- well as an investment. Investors can never build a tional government bonds. properly diversified portfolio of housing. The attrib- In recent years, gold has appreciated markedly, utes of a home are a by-product of its intrinsic utility but over the long term its investment performance to those who dwell there. has been modest. Whereas the pleasure of owning and storing a gold bar is somewhat limited, housing Other assets has appreciated at a similar annualized rate to gold, while home owners receive the benefit of living Our list of assets is far from exhaustive, and there there. is a substantial literature that discusses “new real Table 3 also shows the standard deviation of assets.” These extend from private equity, through each asset class. It is worth noting that the housing commodity-linked derivatives, energy, and timber, series are averaged across properties (i.e. measur- to more recent asset classes such as infrastructure, ing the infeasible strategy of highly diversified home farmland, and intellectual property. There is a useful ownership) and over time (because individual prop- discussion in Martin (2010), and Ilmanen (2011) erties trade infrequently). Consequently, the stan- also reviews strategies designed to overcome ex- dard deviation reported in the last row of Table 3 posure to inflation. understates the home owner’s true financial risk The dilemma for investors is to identify securities exposure. that have a reliable capacity to hedge inflation on an Most investors are concerned about the pur- out-of-sample basis. For individual stocks this turns chasing power of their portfolios, and want some out to be exceptionally challenging. Ang, Brière, protection against inflation. The final column of and Signori (2011) conclude that “the substantial Table 3 summarizes the sensitivity of annual real variation of inflation betas makes it difficult to find returns to contemporaneous inflation. Equities are stocks that are good ex-ante inflation hedges.” hurt in real terms by inflation, but bonds are more Similarly, in a detailed study of listed infrastructure, exposed to the impact of inflation. The short term Roedel and Rothballer (2011) conclude that “infra- structure as an enhanced inflation hedge appears Table 3 to be rather wishful thinking than empirical fact.” It is tough to find individual equities, or classes of Real returns and inflation, 1900–2011 equities, or sectors that are reliable as hedges Note: Equity returns are for world index in USD. Bond and bill returns are US. Gold is converted to USD. All returns are adjusted for inflation. Housing against inflation, whether the focus is on utilities, excludes income and is an average of local inflation-adjusted indexes. infrastructure, REITs, stocks with low inflation be- Source: Elroy Dimson, Paul Marsh, and Mike Staunton, IPD, WGC, and tas, or other attributes. Portfolio tilts toward such studies cited in text securities should therefore be made in moderation Geometric Arithmetic Standard Sensitivity and with humility, and with effective diversification Asset mean mean deviation to inflation across assets that are targeted as a hedge against Equities 5.4% 6.9% 17.7% –0.52 inflation. Bonds 1.7% 2.3% 10.4% –0.74 Bills 0.9% 1.0% 4.7% –0.62 Gold 1.0% 2.4% 12.4% 0.26 Housing 1.3% 1.5% 8.9% –0.20
  11. 11. CREDIT SUISSE GLOBAL INVESTMENT RETURNS YEARBOOK 2012_ 15interest rate fluctuates to reflect news about infla-tion, and so the return on cash (bills) should be,and is, somewhat less sensitive to inflation thanlonger-term bonds. Gold has on average been resistant to the im-pact of inflation. However, investment in gold hasgenerated volatile price fluctuations. There havebeen long periods when the gold investor was“underwater” in real terms. Compared to traded financial assets, housingappears to be less sensitive to inflation. Commercialreal estate may share these attributes, though theevidence is weaker and we do not have a returnhistory that goes back so far. It is important to notethat, because trading in residential and commercialproperty is intermittent, there may be longer-termresponses to inflation that are more severe than ourannual analysis suggest (comparison of Tables 1and 2 supports this view). Inflation protection has a cost in terms of lowerexpected returns. While an inflation-protected port-folio may perform better when there is a shock tothe general price level, during periods of disinflationor deflation such a portfolio can be expected tounderperform. The assets that will best protect against deflationare quite different from inflation-hedging assets.There are few assets that provide a hedge againstdeflation, and only bonds can do this reliably. Bondportfolios can be extended from domestic govern-ment securities to global fixed income and inflation-linked bonds, while being cognizant of the creditrisk that is now associated with sovereign issuers.Similarly, portfolio holdings of cash can be en-hanced with shorter-term inflation-linked bondholdings. Equity portfolios should be diversified across na-tional markets, so that foreign currency exposurecan work with foreign equity exposures to provide ahedge against local inflation. Inflation-averse inves-tors should consider extending a traditional stock-bond-cash portfolio to assets that may provideadditional inflation protection. However, the litera-ture indicates that this is challenging because sen-sitivity to inflation changes over time. The bottom line is that, although equities arethought to provide a hedge against inflation, theircapacity to do so is limited. While inflation clearlyharms the real value of bonds and cash, equitiesare not immune. They are at best a partial hedgeagainst inflation and offer limited protection againstrising prices. The real case for equities is that, overthe long term, stockholders have enjoyed a largeequity risk premium.

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