How Teaching Adults Impacts your Instruction<br />Stan Skrabut<br />@skrabut<br />#UWCES<br />http://www.slideshare.net/sk...
More and more adults are participating in adult education.<br />
You are an adult educator<br />
You are noticing that it can be a challenge to work with adults.<br />
You want to implement better adult learning strategies.<br />
Let me show why adults can be challenging and some strategies to help.<br />
Adults have a number of characteristics that may affect adult learning.<br />
Adults are typically classified in 3 groups: young adults, working-age adults, and older adults. <br />
Young adults are 18-24 years old and are mostly in college; they make up 13% of population.<br />
Working-age adults range from 25-64 years of age and make up 70% of population.<br />
Older adults are 65 years and older, and make up 17% of population. (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010)<br />
Knowles (1980) defines an adult as someone who behaves as an adult, and who perceives themselves as adults.<br />
As adults age, hearing begins to fade. <br />
“Hearing difficulties affects more than 25 percent of adults over the age of 65” (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
Older adults may have trouble translating what is being said or understanding rapid speech. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
Some adult may have problems hearing certain frequency ranges. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
While reading skills may not diminish, changes in sight can affect learning.<br />
Changes in sight can be corrected with glasses and proper lighting. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
Older adults may have problems processing information visually and may need more time. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
For visual presentations, ensure the font size is large enough for easy viewing.<br />
Contrary to popular belief, memory only diminishes slightly over time.<br />
Because of issues with sight and hearing, older adults may have problems with sensory memory (Rothwell, 2008).<br />
Long-term memory does not appear to be affected by aging. (Rothwell, 2008)<br />
Older adults may have problems with short-term memory and may need more time to learn. (Rothwell, 2008)<br />
Research has shown that adults are able to continue to learn even into old age.<br />
“When information is learned well, and new material is integrated with prior knowledge, older adults remember and use this...
“Adults can learn!” ~ Knowles<br />
As the field of adult education developed, some assumptions about adult learners formed.<br />
Malcolm Knowles has outlined four crucial assumptions in The Modern Practice of Adult Education.<br />
Adult learners tend to be more self-directed. They do not wish to stay dependent on others.<br />
Adults gain experience throughout life and in turn become a resource. They want to build on their experiences.<br />
Adult learners want to gain experience to solve real-life tasks.<br />
Adult learners need to understand why a topic is important before learning it.<br />
Adults are oriented to learning if they believe it will help them in life situations.<br />
William Rothwell outlines six reasons why adults are motivated to learn.<br />
Some adult learners learn in order maintain skills in the workplace.<br />
Adult learners pursue training in order to advance their careers.<br />
Many adults learn in order to develop skills to help others.<br />
Some adults learn as a means of escape or adventure.<br />
Many adults learn for the sake of learning.<br />
Some adults are interested in making social connects.<br />
Based on what is known about adult learners, there are some strategies for improving instruction.<br />
Strategies from Patricia Cross in Adults as Learners make up the core strategies to keep in mind. <br />
Present information in meaningful and relevant ways. (Wlodkowski, 2008). Make learning as specific as possible.<br />
Use aids like checklists and mnemonics to help organize information (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
Present material on a pace to help with learning (Wlodkowski, 2008). Older adults want to learn it the right way the first...
Present one idea at a time. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
Summarize material often, and summarize after each section (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
Encourage notetaking. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
Connect new applications of information to important issues and problems. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
Here are additional strategies to keep in mind. <br />
Create successful learning situations, adult do not like to appear foolish or incompetent. (Rothwell, 2008).<br />
Ensure the learning environment is conducive to learning. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
Involve learners in the planning process. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
Incorporate experiential activities so learners can practice what is being presented. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
Scaffold learning objectives so that one lesson builds upon a previous lesson. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
When you group learners, it is sometimes better to have homogeneous groupings. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
Focus on problems to solve rather than subjects to teach. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
References<br />
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How Teaching Adults Impacts your Instruction

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This presentation focuses on characteristics and assumptions of adult learners, and presents strategies for helping adult learners. Supported by works from Knowles, Cross, Wlodkowski, and Rothwell.

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How Teaching Adults Impacts your Instruction

  1. 1. How Teaching Adults Impacts your Instruction<br />Stan Skrabut<br />@skrabut<br />#UWCES<br />http://www.slideshare.net/skrabut<br />
  2. 2. More and more adults are participating in adult education.<br />
  3. 3. You are an adult educator<br />
  4. 4. You are noticing that it can be a challenge to work with adults.<br />
  5. 5. You want to implement better adult learning strategies.<br />
  6. 6. Let me show why adults can be challenging and some strategies to help.<br />
  7. 7. Adults have a number of characteristics that may affect adult learning.<br />
  8. 8. Adults are typically classified in 3 groups: young adults, working-age adults, and older adults. <br />
  9. 9. Young adults are 18-24 years old and are mostly in college; they make up 13% of population.<br />
  10. 10. Working-age adults range from 25-64 years of age and make up 70% of population.<br />
  11. 11. Older adults are 65 years and older, and make up 17% of population. (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010)<br />
  12. 12. Knowles (1980) defines an adult as someone who behaves as an adult, and who perceives themselves as adults.<br />
  13. 13. As adults age, hearing begins to fade. <br />
  14. 14. “Hearing difficulties affects more than 25 percent of adults over the age of 65” (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  15. 15. Older adults may have trouble translating what is being said or understanding rapid speech. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  16. 16. Some adult may have problems hearing certain frequency ranges. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  17. 17. While reading skills may not diminish, changes in sight can affect learning.<br />
  18. 18. Changes in sight can be corrected with glasses and proper lighting. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  19. 19. Older adults may have problems processing information visually and may need more time. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  20. 20. For visual presentations, ensure the font size is large enough for easy viewing.<br />
  21. 21. Contrary to popular belief, memory only diminishes slightly over time.<br />
  22. 22. Because of issues with sight and hearing, older adults may have problems with sensory memory (Rothwell, 2008).<br />
  23. 23. Long-term memory does not appear to be affected by aging. (Rothwell, 2008)<br />
  24. 24. Older adults may have problems with short-term memory and may need more time to learn. (Rothwell, 2008)<br />
  25. 25. Research has shown that adults are able to continue to learn even into old age.<br />
  26. 26. “When information is learned well, and new material is integrated with prior knowledge, older adults remember and use this information into old age” (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  27. 27. “Adults can learn!” ~ Knowles<br />
  28. 28. As the field of adult education developed, some assumptions about adult learners formed.<br />
  29. 29. Malcolm Knowles has outlined four crucial assumptions in The Modern Practice of Adult Education.<br />
  30. 30. Adult learners tend to be more self-directed. They do not wish to stay dependent on others.<br />
  31. 31. Adults gain experience throughout life and in turn become a resource. They want to build on their experiences.<br />
  32. 32. Adult learners want to gain experience to solve real-life tasks.<br />
  33. 33. Adult learners need to understand why a topic is important before learning it.<br />
  34. 34. Adults are oriented to learning if they believe it will help them in life situations.<br />
  35. 35. William Rothwell outlines six reasons why adults are motivated to learn.<br />
  36. 36. Some adult learners learn in order maintain skills in the workplace.<br />
  37. 37. Adult learners pursue training in order to advance their careers.<br />
  38. 38. Many adults learn in order to develop skills to help others.<br />
  39. 39. Some adults learn as a means of escape or adventure.<br />
  40. 40. Many adults learn for the sake of learning.<br />
  41. 41. Some adults are interested in making social connects.<br />
  42. 42. Based on what is known about adult learners, there are some strategies for improving instruction.<br />
  43. 43. Strategies from Patricia Cross in Adults as Learners make up the core strategies to keep in mind. <br />
  44. 44. Present information in meaningful and relevant ways. (Wlodkowski, 2008). Make learning as specific as possible.<br />
  45. 45. Use aids like checklists and mnemonics to help organize information (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  46. 46. Present material on a pace to help with learning (Wlodkowski, 2008). Older adults want to learn it the right way the first time.<br />
  47. 47. Present one idea at a time. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  48. 48. Summarize material often, and summarize after each section (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  49. 49. Encourage notetaking. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  50. 50. Connect new applications of information to important issues and problems. (Wlodkowski, 2008).<br />
  51. 51. Here are additional strategies to keep in mind. <br />
  52. 52. Create successful learning situations, adult do not like to appear foolish or incompetent. (Rothwell, 2008).<br />
  53. 53. Ensure the learning environment is conducive to learning. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
  54. 54. Involve learners in the planning process. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
  55. 55. Incorporate experiential activities so learners can practice what is being presented. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
  56. 56. Scaffold learning objectives so that one lesson builds upon a previous lesson. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
  57. 57. When you group learners, it is sometimes better to have homogeneous groupings. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
  58. 58. Focus on problems to solve rather than subjects to teach. (Knowles, 1980)<br />
  59. 59. References<br />
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