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Personality Profiling And Chemistry

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  • 1. iStudio Masterclass #2 Agency Orientation Day Andrew Thomas
  • 2. Agenda •  This morning •  What makes working in Agencies challenging •  Tools and techniques to improve your chances of success •  Practice! •  This afternoon •  Developing great ideas •  Selling them brilliantly •  More practice….
  • 3. How much have you remembered??? •  Who invented the world wide web? •  When did Google launch? •  When did You Tube launch? •  What’s a # hashtag? •  What is Web 2.0? •  Which is the most popular website in the UK?
  • 4. Understanding the importance of personality profiling in building great relationships
  • 5. Purpose of this morning’s session •  To understand the importance of chemistry in achieving positive outcomes •  Through introducing you to Personality Profiling provide you with a psychological framework to help support the development of good working relationships
  • 6. At the end of the morning you will… •  Understand what we mean by the importance of chemistry in developing relationships •  Understand Personality Profiling and your own dominant profile •  Be able to identify the four different behavioural styles in your colleagues and clients •  Know how to apply profiling to develop your communication style and persuade others •  Develop valuable strategies for dealing with objections
  • 7. Is Chemistry important? •  That soft yucky stuff! •  The X Factor •  Remember we work in a relationship profession •  Doesn't sound professional – so seldom given as a reason to persuade or not as the case may be •  In industry it has been proven that chemistry is the single most important factor in generate a positive outcome from a situation •  Should you leave it to chance… we just don’t get on!
  • 8. Is Chemistry important? •  Seldom talked about •  A wimpy reason •  Fact: People buy and learn more from people they get on with •  Fact: They buy and learn even more from those people they like…
  • 9. Personality Profiling and Building Rapport •  Saying what we mean and meaning what we say is only half the battle •  Communication style is dictated to a large extent by behavioural style •  Understanding different behavioural styles can be a powerful tool in improving communication skills and generating positive outcomes •  Language is important but so is managing behaviour to ensure we build rapport •  Personality Profiling helps get it right
  • 10. Personality Profiling •  Based upon the Myers Briggs Type Indicator model (MBTI) – making Jung’s theory of personality tangible •  MBTI describes an individual’s preferences on four dimensions •  Extroverted or Introverted •  Sensing or Intuitive •  Thinking or Feeling •  Judging or Perceiving •  Various combinations result in 16 personality types
  • 11. Applying a media dimension Task Orientated Thinking People Orientated Feeling Ask Questions Give Instructions Introverted Extroverted
  • 12. Applying a media dimension I E N X T T R R O Task Orientated O V V E People Orientated E R R T T E E D D Ask Questions Give Instructions
  • 13. Applying a media dimension Task Orientated People Orientated Ask Questions Give Instructions
  • 14. Applying a media dimension Always want more detail Always want to get on with it Always wants the opinion of others Always want to talk about something else else
  • 15. Profile Characteristics E I DEEP DECISIVE X N CORRECT FAST PACED THOUGHTFUL TASK FOCUSED T T R PERFECTIONIST GOAL ORIENTATED R CONSCIENTIOUS EXUDES CONFIDENCE O O V V E E R R T T E E D RELATIONSHIP INSPIRATIONAL D FOCUSED OUTGOING SUPPORTIVE SOCIABLE LOW-KEY CREATIVE QUIET FUN CALM
  • 16. Verbal Clues BLUNT E I MONOTONE CRITICAL X N QUESTIONING FAST PACED THOUGHTFUL T T CONFIDENT TONE ASK STYLE BUSINESS LIKE R R LONG SILENCES TELLS A QUESTION O O V V E E R R T T E E D RELATIONSHIP BASED BUTTERFLY SUBJECT D QUIETER SPEECH INTERRUPTS SLOW PACED CONFIDENT SMALL TALK EXPRESSIVE PERSONAL LOUD
  • 17. Body Language QUICK I RIGID POSTURE LEANS FORWARD E FORMAL X N DIRECT EYE CONTACT QUICK COOL HANDSHAKE T FIRM HANDSHAKE T CREATES BARRIERS R WIDE PERSONAL SPACE SMALL PERSONAL R O SPACE O V V E E R R T T E E D CAUTIOUS DEMEANOUR OPEN D MORE FACIAL EXPRESSION SMILES MORE GENTLE HANDSHAKE QUICK HANDSHAKE INTERMITTENT EYE SMALL PERSONAL SPACE CONTACT ANIMATED RELAXED POSTURE
  • 18. Triggers SLOW SERVICE E I POOR QUALITY TIME WASTING BEING IGNORED X N INDECISIVENESS T BEING PUSHED T LACK OF INFORMATION INCOMPETENCE R R O O V V E E R R T T E E D D SUDDEN CHANGE FLIPPANCY BEING PRESSURED REJECTION BEING IGNORED DETAIL OVERLOAD IMPERSONAL SERVICE SLOW SERVICE
  • 19. To sum up… Analytical, persistent, scheduled, Persuasive, competitive, outspoken, orderly, detailed, faithful, deep, confident, independent, daring, bold, fussy, insecure, hard to please impatient, headstrong, proud Adaptable, controlled, satisfied, Sociable, spontaneous, convincing, friendly, obliging, consistent, lively, talkative, inspiring, cheerful, reluctant, indecisive, inoffensive haphazard, permissive, inconsistent
  • 20. What’s his profile?
  • 21. What’s his profile?
  • 22. What’s his profile?
  • 23. What’s his profile?
  • 24. How about these?
  • 25. What’s the relevance? •  Understanding the person’s profile means you will understand how they are likely to act face-to-face •  You will understand how they make decisions •  You will know how much information they need •  You will be prepared for the dynamics of the relationship •  You will operate in the best possible light
  • 26. In practical terms… •  slow down and listen •  keep them busy •  don’t control too much – carefully •  be conservative in your they will rebel •  they need challenges I assertions E •  explain in detail •  they need help to break X N T • ask precise questions large projects into small R O T chunks V E R R T E O D V E R T •  slow down – be patient and •  do not dominate – but E clear keep them on track D •  be sincere in your tone of •  ask for ideas and voice opinions •  take a personal interest in •  make sure they what they are doing understand the task •  help them set realistic goals for the task
  • 27. Communication Tips When communicating with a person who is ambitious, forceful, decisive, strong-willed, independent and goal- orientated: •  Be clear, specific, brief and to the point •  Stick to business •  Be prepared with support material in a well-organised “package” Factors that will create tension or dissatisfaction •  Talking about things that are not relevant to the issue •  Leaving loopholes or cloudy issues •  Appearing disorganised
  • 28. Communication Tips When communicating with a person who is magnetic, enthusiastic, friendly, demonstrative and political: •  Provide a warm and friendly environment •  Do not deal with a lot of details (put them in writing) •  Ask “feeling” questions to draw their opinions or comments Factors that will create tension or dissatisfaction: •  Being curt, cold or tight-lipped •  Controlling the conversation •  Focusing on facts and figures, alternatives and abstractions
  • 29. Communication Tips When communicating with a person who is dependent, neat, conservative, perfectionist, careful and compliant: •  Prepare you “case” in advance  •  Stick to business •  Be accurate and realistic Factors that will create tension or dissatisfaction: •  Being giddy, casual, informal, loud •  Pushing too hard or being unrealistic with deadlines •  Being disorganised or messy
  • 30. Communication Tips When communicating with a person who is patient, predictable, reliable, steady, relaxed and modest: •  Begin with a personal comment, break the ice  •  Present your case softly, non-threateningly  •  Ask “how?” questions to draw their opinions Factors that will create tension or dissatisfaction: •  Rushing headlong into business  •  Being domineering or demanding  •  Forcing them to reply quickly to your objectives
  • 31. Remember! •  Understand your own profile and mask accordingly •  Understand the profile of your colleagues/clients/ commissioners and how they will react to you and your actions! •  Make the most of the triggers they will be engaged by •  By wary of what behaviours are likely to antagonise •  Body language is pivotal… •  Thank you
  • 32. Why do some teams work and others don’t?
  • 33. Why do some teams work? •  Is it just chemistry… •  Is it just that the individuals complement each other (or compliment each other!) •  Are effective teams balanced? •  Can we define and help teams work better together?
  • 34. It starts with knowing yourself Enhanced Self Your own view How others see you Understanding Reflection
  • 35. Team Role Theory •  Why do some teams work? •  1970s Dr Meredith Belbin at Henley Management College set about observing teams to find out why •  Surprisingly it was not about intellect but behaviour •  Individual clusters of behaviour formed distinct contributions or “Team Roles”
  • 36. Team Role Definition “A tendency to behave, contribute, and interrelate with others in a particular way”
  • 37. 8 + 1 roles
  • 38. Roles and descriptions •  Plant •  The first identified team role •  Planted in each team because they were good at solving problems in unconventional ways •  Team – Role contribution: creative, imaginative, unorthodox, solves difficult problems •  Allowable weaknesses: Ignores incidentals, too pre- occupied with own thoughts to communicate effectively
  • 39. Roles and descriptions •  Monitor evaluator •  Provides the logical eye, make impartial judgments, weighs up options dispassionately •  Team – Role contribution: serious-minded, strategic and discerning, sees all options, judges accurately •  Allowable weaknesses: can lack drive and ability to inspire others
  • 40. Roles and descriptions •  Co-ordinators •  Focus on the team objectives, draw out team members and delegate work appropriately •  Team – Role contribution: mature, confident, clarifies goals, brings people together to promote team discussions •  Allowable weaknesses: can be seen as manipulative and offload personal work
  • 41. Roles and descriptions •  Resource investigators •  When the team is at risk of being too inward-looking they provide the external focus •  Team – Role contribution: extrovert, enthusiastic, communicative, exploring opportunities, develops contacts •  Allowable weaknesses: over-optimistic, can lose interest once initial enthusiasm passes
  • 42. Roles and descriptions •  Implementers •  Plan a practical, workable strategy and carry it out as efficiently as possible •  Team – Role contribution: disciplined, reliable, conservative in habits, a capacity for taking practical steps and actions •  Allowable weaknesses: somewhat inflexible, slow to respond to new possibilities
  • 43. Roles and descriptions •  Completer Finishers •  Most effectively used at the end of job to “polish” and scrutinise the work for errors •  Team – Role contribution: painstaking, conscientious, anxious, searches out errors, delivers on time •  Allowable weaknesses: inclined to worry unduly, reluctant to let others into own job
  • 44. Roles and descriptions •  Teamworkers •  Helps teams gel and use their versatility to identify the work required and complete it on behalf of the team •  Team – Role contribution: co-operative, mild, perceptive, diplomatic, listens, builds and averts friction •  Allowable weaknesses: indecisive in crunch situations
  • 45. Roles and descriptions •  Shapers •  Provides the necessary drive to ensure that the tea keep moving and does not lose focus or momentum •  Team – Role contribution: challenging, dynamic, thrives on pressure, has the drive and courage to overcome obstacles •  Allowable weaknesses: prone to provocation, liable to offend others
  • 46. Roles and descriptions •  Specialists •  Only emerged after the initial research was completed •  Simulation obscured the need for in-depth knowledge of a key subject §area •  Team – Role contribution: single-minded, self-starting, dedicated, provides knowledge and skills in rare supply •  Allowable weaknesses: contributes on only a narrow front, dwells on technicalities
  • 47. Role and descriptions •  Less high profile does not mean less important •  Balance is key – each behaviour is essential •  Without a plant there maybe no spark •  Without a shaper deadlines will be missed •  By identifying our team roles we can ensure that we use our strengths to advantage and manage our “allowable weaknesses” as best we can
  • 48. In a nutshell The Belbin philosophy is about celebrating – and making the most of – individual differences. The message is that there is room for everyone in the team: all positive contributions welcome
  • 49. Which one are you?
  • 50. In summary