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Presentation to PMI Memphis Chapter audience in March 2009

Presentation to PMI Memphis Chapter audience in March 2009

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  • PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee [CIAC] 20 August 2007 [Welcome and thank audience] Thank you for welcoming me today. Good (time of day) and thank you for coming along to this session The topic of effective issue resolution is presented here in the context of the revised Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct One of the aims of this session is to make this a discussion and as interactive as possible – the topic of ethics does lend it self to discussion ASK How Many Component Leaders in the room ? How Many NEW Component leaders ? How many know PMI has a Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct? How nay have recently renewed your Membership with PMI? OK – so you’ve ALL carefully read the Code and are ready to answer a series of questions (smile) Did you notice the check box when you joined / rejoined ? ASK AUDIENCE TO DESCRIBE AN ETHICAL PERSON IN ONE WORD. WE WANT TO MAKE THE LINKAGE THAT AN ETHICAL PERSON IS SOMEBODY THAT YOU CAN TRUST!

Transcript

  • 1. Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee Ethics and Decision Making for Leaders By Saji Madapat PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee (CIAC)
  • 2. Agenda
    • The role of CIAC
    • Why an Ethics Code?
    • Features of PMI’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
    • Application and Implementation Considerations
    • What’s in it for Me?
    • Summary
    • Parking Lot
    • Example Scenarios for Discussion
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 3. Role of CIAC
    • Committee Purpose
      • Facilitate the implementation and communication across the PMI organization of the revised PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct to ensure implementation, stakeholder communication, and the development of principles and procedures for sustaining the Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 4. Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee PMI CIAC 2009 TEAM with PMI BOD Chair
  • 5. Exclusions to the Charter of CIAC Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
    • Hearing or resolution of ethics complaints or perceived violations
    • Advising individual practitioners regarding ethics
    • Providing guidance regarding ethics to PMI community-at-large
  • 6. Why an Ethics Code? Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 7. What is Ethics?
    • Common themes:
      • Express values commonly held as important to the community, organization or team
      • Values guide the behavior of the community.
      • Ethics hold the community together and allow it to function on a level of trust.
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 8. Ethics Standards are Needed by All Organizations
    • Ethical Behavior creates trust which:
    • Creates relationships that work.
    • Creates an environment of responsibility, respect, honesty and fairness in which people will work together to reach a common goal.
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 9. Ethics in Business?
  • 10. Ethics Standards are Needed by Professional Organizations
    • Additionally, to:
    • Distinguish the profession
    • Establish a common understanding of professional obligations to stakeholders
    • Creates trust with stakeholders
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 11. Ethics and Leadership
    • “ Ethics and leadership go hand in hand. An ethical environment is conducive to effective leadership, and effective leadership is conducive to ethics. Ethics and Leadership function as both cause and effect.”
    • William D. Hitt, Ethics and Leadership
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 12. Agenda
    • The role of CIAC
    • Why an Ethics Code?
    • Features of PMI’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
    • Application and Implementation Considerations
    • Example Scenarios for Discussion
    • What’s in it For Me?
    • Summary
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 13. How We Built Our Global Ethics Standard
    • Built by members of the profession
    • Language is not legalistic or colloquial
    • Content is culturally sensitive
    • Perspective is not Euro- or North American-centric
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 14. What Practitioners Wanted in an Ethics Code
    • Four Values: Responsibility, Respect, Fairness and Honesty
    • One ethics code
      • With portions that address unique needs of specific audiences
    • Applies to:
      • All PMI members
      • All PMI certificants and applicants - members and non-members
      • PMI volunteers - members and non-members
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 15. Responsibility Respect Fairness Honesty Ownership of decisions and actions Treatment of people and resources Objective and impartial decisions Understand-ing the truth and truth-based action
    • Honoring commitments
    • Upholding legal and ethical rules
    • Good faith
    • Non-abusive
    • Respect for resources
    • Transparency
    • Proper handling of conflicts of interest
    • Proper motive in decisions
    • No deception
    • No dishonest behavior
    PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Values Definition of Values Aspirational and Mandatory Conduct Described Content Covered in the Code Framework for Ethics Code
  • 16. Features of Ethics Code
    • Written from perspective of “we talking to we”
    • "Comments" further illuminate key provisions
    • Does not attempt to define every possible situation an individual may encounter, nor does it attempt to provide “the single right answer”
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 17. Four clearly defined values
    • Values identified based on PMI members survey
    • Responsibility 81.9%
    • Fairness 78.7%
    • Respect 78.0%
    • Honesty/Truth 67.8%
    • The number value below was a distant runner-up:
    • Honor 39.6%
  • 18. Responsibility - duty to take ownership
    • Aspirational Standards
    • best interests of society, public safety, and the environment.
    • accept only those assignments that are consistent with our background, experience, skills, and qualifications
    • fulfill the commitments
    • take ownership of errors or omissions
    • protect proprietary or confidential information
    • uphold Code and hold each other accountable to it.
    • Mandatory Standards
    • Regulations and Legal Requirements
    • inform ourselves about policies, rules, regulations and laws that govern our work
    • report unethical or illegal conduct
    • Ethics Complaints
    • bring violations of this Code for resolution
    • only file ethics complaints when they are substantiated by facts
    • pursue disciplinary action against an individual who retaliates against a person raising ethics concerns.
    „ The price of greatness is responsibility. ” Winston Churchill
  • 19. Responsibility
    • Excerpts of PMI Ethics Code
    • We protect proprietary or confidential information that has been entrusted to us.
    • We inform ourselves and uphold the policies, rules, regulations and laws that govern our work, professional, and volunteer activities.
    • We uphold this Code and hold each other accountable to it.
    • Examples of Applicability to Component Leaders
    • Not disclose confidential information to unauthorized parties.
    • Not engage in illegal conduct.
    • Not take or abuse the property of others, including intellectual property.
    • Not engage in slander or libel.
    • Develop ground rules, aligned with the Code, for how component board or committee will work together.
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee Key Provisions and Applicability to Component Leaders
  • 20. Responsibility
  • 21. Respect - duty to show a high regard
    • Aspirational Standards
    • inform ourselves about the norms and customs of others
    • listen to others’ points of view, seeking to understand them
    • approach directly those persons with whom we have a conflict or disagreement
    • conduct ourselves in a professional manner
    • Mandatory Standards
    • negotiate in good faith.
    • do not exercise the power of our expertise or position to influence the decisions or actions of others in order to benefit personally at their expense
    • do not act in an abusive manner toward others
    • respect the property rights of others.
    „ To be one, to be united is a great thing. But to respect the right to be different is maybe even greater. ” Bono
  • 22.
    • Excerpts of PMI Ethics Code
    • Approach directly persons with whom we have a conflict or disagreement
    • Requirement to negotiate in good faith
    • Prohibition on exercising our power or position to influence the decisions of others
    • Examples of Applicability to Component Leaders
    • Conducting ourselves in a professional manner, even when it is not reciprocated.
      • Avoiding gossip and making negative remarks to undermine another person’s reputation.
    • Listening to others’ points of view, seeking to understand them.
    • Acting in good faith during all phases of the contracting process for the component.
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee Key Provisions and Applicability to Component Leaders Respect
  • 23. Respect
  • 24. Fairness - duty to act impartially and objectively
    • Aspirational Standards
    • demonstrate transparency in decision-making process
    • constantly reexamine impartiality and objectivity
    • provide equal access to information to those who are authorized
    • make opportunities equally available to qualified candidates.
    • Mandatory Standards
    • Conflict of Interest Situations
    • proactively and fully disclose any real or potential conflicts of interest to the appropriate stakeholders
    • when realize conflict of interest, disclose, refrain from the decision-making process
    • Favoritism and Discrimination
    • do not hire or fire, reward or punish, or award or deny contracts based on personal considerations, including but not limited to, favoritism, nepotism, or bribery
    • do not discriminate against others based on, but not limited to, gender, race, age, religion, disability, nationality, or sexual orientation
    • apply the rules of the organization (employer, Project Management Institute, or other group) without favoritism or prejudice.
    „ I think perfect objectivity is an unrealistic goal; fairness, however, is not. ” Michael Pollan
  • 25.
    • Excerpts of PMI Ethics Code
    • Demonstrating transparency in decision making.
    • Constantly reexamining our impartiality and objectivity.
    • Requirement to disclose conflict of interest situations
    • Examples of Applicability to Component Leaders
    • Applying policies consistently.
    • Proactively searching for potential conflicts of interest.
    • Disclosing all conflict of interest situations before the Board or committee discusses the situation.
      • A perceived conflict is still a conflict.
      • Having a conflict is OK.
      • Unresolved conflicts are not OK.
    • Avoiding using your component position for personal interest or business gain.
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee Key Provisions and Applicability to Component Leaders Fairness
  • 26. Fairness
  • 27. Honesty - duty to understand the truth
    • Aspirational Standards
    • seek to understand the truth
    • truthful in our communications and in our conduct
    • provide accurate information in a timely manner
    • make commitments and promises, implied or explicit, in good faith.
    • strive to create an environment in which others feel safe to tell the truth
    • Mandatory Standards
    • do not engage in or condone behavior that is designed to deceive others (misleading or false statements, half-truths, information out of context, withholding information…)
    • do not engage in dishonest behavior with the intention of personal gain or at the expense of another.
    „ Honesty is the best policy. ” Benjamin Franklin
  • 28.
    • Excerpts of PMI Ethics Code
    • Earnestly seeking to understand the truth.
    • Creating an environment whether others feel safe telling the truth.
    • Prohibition on engaging or condoning behavior that is designed to deceive others.
    • Examples of Applicability to Component Leaders
    • Component reporting is accurate, truthful, and timely.
      • Annual report
      • Component website or newsletter
    • Component board or committee meetings are held in a way that:
      • Diverse viewpoints are heard and considered.
      • “ Bad news” is shared and dealt with professionally.
      • Avoiding misleading statements, half-truths, providing information out of context, or withholding information.
    Key Provisions and Applicability to Component Leaders Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee Honesty
  • 29. Honesty
  • 30. Agenda
    • The role of CIAC
    • Why an Ethics Code?
    • Features of PMI’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
    • Application and Implementation Considerations
    • Example Scenarios for Discussion
    • What’s in it For Me?
    • Summary
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 31. Application Considerations
    • Ethics is “messy”
      • Dilemmas abound
      • Doing the right thing, even when you know it, can be difficult
    • Conflict of interest is a key issue for PMI volunteers
      • Need to focus on identifying real and perceived COI for ourselves and others, then getting them resolved
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 32. Ethics Complaints
    • Code is clear on ethics complaints
      • As professionals, we have a duty to bring violations of the Code to the attention of the appropriate body for resolution
      • We only file ethics complaints when they are substantiated by facts
      • We abstain from accusing others when we do not have all the facts
    • Implications
      • Making a complaint is a formal process which may have significant consequences
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 33. Ethics Complaint Reporting Processes
    • As of 1 January 2008:
    • Ethics Review Committee hears all ethics complaints, including those involving certificants.
    • Ethics Appeals Committee hears all ethics appeals, including those involving certificants.
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee NEW in 2008
  • 34. Agenda Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
    • The role of CIAC
    • Why an Ethics Code?
    • Features of PMI’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
    • Application and Implementation Considerations
    • Example Scenarios for Discussion
    • What’s in it For Me?
    • Summary
  • 35. What do these scenarios mean to me?
    • As a PMI member
    • As a component leader
    • As project manager
    • „ You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today. ”
    • -Abraham Lincoln
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 36. „ Kali” Law Kali and Mea - characters from H. Sienkiewicz "In desert and in wilderness"
  • 37.
    • Each of us, by our actions, shapes the reputation of PMI and the profession.
    • Each of us has a duty to uphold the provisions in the ethics code and to hold our peers accountable as well.
    • The ethics code will never be "finished" – it will continue to evolve and mature with our profession
    • YOU can play a leadership role by setting ground rules for how your board or committee will operate; openly discussing ethics; and showcasing ethical behavior.
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee Summary
  • 38. Summary „ Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws.” Plato
  • 39. Resources
    • CIAC (Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee)
      • Provide feedback to CIAC on clarifications or commentary regarding the ethics code: 2009 CIAC Chair: Gabe de Puyjalon, [email_address]
    • Your component mentor
    • http://www.pmi.org/AboutUs/Pages/Ethics.aspx
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 40. : Saji Madapat MBA, CSSMBB, PMP PMI CIAC [email_address]
  • 41. Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
    • Saji is serving his 2 nd term in PMI Code of Ethics Implementation Advisory Committee (CIAC) - a committee of the PMI global Board, advising on Ethics strategies. As an Advisor- Portfolio Management Office, Saji played an instrumental role in setting up Portfolio Management office by mapping organization strategies and balance score card of $5B FedEx Freight corporation to its IT & Non IT projects & programs throughout the organization. Saji was featured in Gartner Global PPM Summit 2008 as an executive BOD room member and had the privilege to present several papers on PPM and OPM3 in various forums. Saji had the project portfolio responsibility for Global Business Systems (ERP&BI) in 20 countries in North & South America, Europe, Africa and Asia Pacific of Buckman (a globally Most Admired Knowledge Enterprise -6 time MAKE award winner). Saji also associated with Bearing Point (KPMG), Ernst & Young (Cap Gemini), Arthur Anderson, BaaN (Vanenburg) Business System and CroweChizek on various strategic projects. Saji’s experience includes Project Feasibility Studies, Appraisals, Industry Analysis, Company Analysis and Strategic Financial Planning.
    •  
    • Saji made significant contribution to PMI’s various strategic initiatives including global standard Books on Portfolio & Program Management Standards, OPM3, PMBOK® Guide and PMCD Framework.
    •  
    • Saji’s PMI achievements include:
    •    Masters from PMI’s Leadership Institute.
    •    PMI Component Mentor (2006 & 2007) role in PMI’s most crucial region (Asia).
    •    Three terms as VP, Finance PMI Memphis TN Chapter. 
    •    Authored and presented over 30 papers at various Global Leadership Conferences.
    •    Judge of PMI's 2004, 2005 & 2007 Project of the Year (POY), Featured in PMI Network Magazine 2008, May
    Saji Madapat MBA, CSSMBB, PMP
  • 42. Values
    • Responsibility is our duty to take ownership for the decisions we make or fail to make, the actions we take or fail to take, and the consequences that result.
    • Respect is our duty to show a high regard for ourselves, others, and the resources entrusted to us. Resources entrusted to us may include people, money, reputation, the safety of others, and natural or environmental resources.
    • Fairness is our duty to make decisions and act impartially and objectively . Our conduct must be free from competing self interest, prejudice, and favoritism.
    • Honesty is our duty to understand the truth and act in a truthful manner both in our communications and in our conduct.
  • 43. Agenda
    • The role of CIAC
    • Why an Ethics Code?
    • Features of PMI’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
    • Application and Implementation Considerations
    • Example Scenarios for Discussion
    • What’s in it For Me?
    • Summary
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 44. Example Scenarios for Discussion
    • Four scenarios are presented, each highlighting an example of the application of the code
    • Break in to four groups, each assigned a scenario. Please read the example and answer the questions
      • Scenario discussion - 15 mins
      • Whole group discussion – 30 mins
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
  • 45. Scenario 1
    • Martin Mann is an information systems engineer who works for a large multi-national firm, Consult Corporation. Mann headed a project team that was working on a response to an RFP to Big Aircraft Corp. for the creation of a state of the art computer system for passenger aircraft. In developing the response Mann’s project team discovered that in order to create a computer system that would meet the performance requirements of the RFP, it would be necessary for the computer system to exceed the physical space and weight restrictions which Big Aircraft has set out in the RFP.
    • During the team meetings one of the project team members raised the issue with Mann as to whether they should disclose the problem to Big Aircraft.
    • Mann responded: “We need to look at this in the real world. If we had to say everything in our proposals nobody would ever get a contract. The customers would do it all themselves. Besides, everyone knows that the guys who are writing the RFP’s are putting stuff in there that they know can’t be done. It’s just part of the negotiation process. In the end everyone gives in a little. Big Aircraft finds the space they say wasn’t there and the IS people give them something else in return. It’s all how the game is played.”
    • As a result, the space and weight problems were not mentioned in Consult Corporation’s response to the RFP.
    • Did Mann’s conduct violate the Code of Ethics?
  • 46.
      • 5.3.1 We do not engage in or condone behavior that is designed to deceive others, including but not limited to, making misleading or false statements, stating half-truths, providing information out of context or withholding information that, if known, would render our statements as misleading or incomplete.
      • 2.3.2 We report unethical or illegal conduct to appropriate management and, if necessary, to those affected by the conduct.
    Scenario 1
  • 47.
    • PMI Member X is a member of the Board of Directors of the Big Hill Chapter of PMI. Member X is the head of the Chapter’s Education Programs. As the head of the Education Programs Member X is responsible for organizing the training courses for the Chapter, including hiring instructors and making sure that the course material is available for the courses.
    • Member X also has his own training company. Member X decides that he would like to get some additional exposure for his company. He plans to sponsor a PMP® examination preparatory course, by having his company pay for the printing of course material for the course. In return Member X has his company’s name and logo placed on the back cover of the training materials. Member X also selects a person who is an employee of his company to teach the course.
    • Has Member X violated the Code of Ethics?
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee Scenario 2
  • 48. Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
      • 4.3.3 We do not hire or fire, reward or punish, or award or deny contracts based on personal considerations, including but not limited to, favoritism, nepotism, or bribery.
      • 5.3.2. We do not engage in dishonest behavior with the intention of personal gain or at the expense of another.
    Scenario 2
  • 49.
    • Member K and Member B are both on the Board of Little Mountain Chapter of PMI.
    • Both Member K and Member B own consulting companies which compete for the same customers. Member K and Member B started their careers in project management working for the same company and they never got along with each other. Now that they are on the Little Mountain Board, both Member K and Member B find every possible opportunity to criticize each other and to find fault with any position that the other takes during Board discussions. Their conduct was negatively impacting the Chapter Board.
    • The President of the Chapter challenged their conduct and asked that they either resign or he would see that the Board removed them from office. Member K filed an ethics complaint against the President alleging that his threat was abusive behavior.
    • What should the President of the Chapter do?
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee Scenario 3
  • 50. Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
      • 3.3.3 We do not act in an abusive manner towards others.
      • 2.3.3 We bring violations of this Code to the attention of the appropriate body for resolution.
      • 2.2.5 We pursue disciplinary action against an individual who retaliates against a person raising ethics concerns.
    Scenario 3
  • 51.
    • Members of the Middle Hill Chapter of PMI have decided to have a study group to prepare members of the Chapter who had applied for the PMP® certification to take the certification examination. Member Z who had recently taken the examination was invited to lead the study group. During the sessions Member Z was asked about the kinds of questions that appear on the examination. Member Z in response provided examples of the questions that they remember were on the test. At the time Member Z applied to take the examination he signed an agreement stating that they would not disclose the content of the examination to anyone. Member Z had forgotten that he had signed the agreement at the time he was leading the study group.
    • Was Member Z’s conduct unethical?
    Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee Scenario 4
  • 52. Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct Implementation Advisory Committee
      • 2.3.1 We inform ourselves and uphold the policies, rules, regulations and laws that govern our work, professional, and volunteer activities.
    Scenario 4