Web 2.0 and BPM
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Web 2.0 and BPM

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How Web 2.0 technologies and concepts are impacting the world of business process management. Originally presented at the BPMG conference in London, 2006.

How Web 2.0 technologies and concepts are impacting the world of business process management. Originally presented at the BPMG conference in London, 2006.

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  • 1. Web 2.0 and BPM Sandy Kemsley Kemsley Design Ltd. Process 2006, London
  • 2. Agenda
    • Web 2.0 defined
    • Enterprise 2.0
    • How Web 2.0 will impact BPM
    • What’s next
  • 3. Web 2.0 Defined (O’Reilly) “ What is Web 2.0”, Tim O’Reilly, © 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  • 4. Web 2.0 Defined (O’Reilly)
    • Web as platform
    • Harnessing collective intelligence
    • Data as the next “Intel Inside”
    • End of the software release cycle
    • Lightweight programming models
    • Software above the level of a single device
    • Rich user experience
  • 5. Key Web 2.0 Characteristics
    • Tagging/folksonomies
    • User-created content and collaboration
    • Network effect
    • Zero-footprint rich user interface (AJAX)
    • Content syndication
    • Software as a service
    • Web mashups
  • 6. From Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 Dion Hinchcliffe
  • 7. Web 2.0 Applications
    • del.icio.us
    • Blogger
    • Flickr
    • Upcoming.org
    • Wikipedia
    • Netvibes
    • Google Maps
  • 8. Enterprise 2.0
    • Web 2.0 software/techniques in enterprise context, behind and across the firewall
    • What’s being used:
      • Wikis
      • Blogs
      • Social bookmarking
      • Content syndication
      • AJAX
  • 9. What’s Driving Web 2.0 In BPM?
    • Increased user expectations
      • Software as a service, e.g., Salesforce.com
      • Rich user interfaces
      • User-created content/tags/comments
    • Commoditization of IT
    • Faster development and content creation
    • Web 2.0 in content management
      • Wikis
      • Tagging
  • 10. How Web 2.0 Will Impact BPM: User View
    • Process tagging/folksonomies
    • User-created processes/mashups
    • Process collaboration (including external):
      • Modelling
      • Design
      • Execution
      • Management
    • Rich user interfaces
  • 11. How Web 2.0 Will Impact BPM: IT View
    • Process syndication for management and visibility
    • Software as a service
    • Lightweight integration models
    • Interoperable processes
  • 12. Isn’t BPM already Web 2.0 (-ish)? Rich user experience  Software above the level of a single device  Lightweight programming models  End of the software release cycle  Data as the next “Intel Inside”  Harnessing collective intelligence  Web as platform 
  • 13. Issues with Web 2.0 and BPM
    • Corporate culture
      • Decentralized content administration
      • Content policing
      • Constantly changing software
      • User participation levels
      • Inter-departmental information sharing
    • Support and SLAs
  • 14. What’s Next?
    • Improvements to BPMS
      • Software as a service with SLA
      • “ Process wiki” as a design paradigm
      • Process instance tagging
      • Process syndication
      • Rich web interfaces for process design and management
      • Process data available for mashing up
  • 15. What’s Next?
    • Changes to implementation and culture
      • Allow users direct access to BPMS tools
      • Reduce over-customisation
      • Encourage tagging and collaboration
  • 16. Thank you ! Sandy Kemsley Kemsley Design Ltd. [email_address] Read my blog at www.column2.com