Econ rev sk

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  • http://www.archaeologyinfo.com/species.htm
  • Around 4000 B.C. city-states began to develope  in ancient Mesopotamia. With their growth, conflicts developed among them. Warfare often arose as the result of wealth, control of the Tigris and Euphrates for transportation and irrigation, boundary disputes, and the need to acquire luxury goods such as timber, stone and metals. Although it is not the earliest conflict, the first war for which there is any detailed evidence occurred between Lagash and Umma in 2525 B.C., two Sumerian cities located eighteen miles apart.
  • Around 4000 B.C. city-states began to develope  in ancient Mesopotamia. With their growth, conflicts developed among them. Warfare often arose as the result of wealth, control of the Tigris and Euphrates for transportation and irrigation, boundary disputes, and the need to acquire luxury goods such as timber, stone and metals. Although it is not the earliest conflict, the first war for which there is any detailed evidence occurred between Lagash and Umma in 2525 B.C., two Sumerian cities located eighteen miles apart.
  • Around 4000 B.C. city-states began to develope  in ancient Mesopotamia. With their growth, conflicts developed among them. Warfare often arose as the result of wealth, control of the Tigris and Euphrates for transportation and irrigation, boundary disputes, and the need to acquire luxury goods such as timber, stone and metals. Although it is not the earliest conflict, the first war for which there is any detailed evidence occurred between Lagash and Umma in 2525 B.C., two Sumerian cities located eighteen miles apart.
  • Around 4000 B.C. city-states began to develope  in ancient Mesopotamia. With their growth, conflicts developed among them. Warfare often arose as the result of wealth, control of the Tigris and Euphrates for transportation and irrigation, boundary disputes, and the need to acquire luxury goods such as timber, stone and metals. Although it is not the earliest conflict, the first war for which there is any detailed evidence occurred between Lagash and Umma in 2525 B.C., two Sumerian cities located eighteen miles apart.
  • Around 4000 B.C. city-states began to develope  in ancient Mesopotamia. With their growth, conflicts developed among them. Warfare often arose as the result of wealth, control of the Tigris and Euphrates for transportation and irrigation, boundary disputes, and the need to acquire luxury goods such as timber, stone and metals. Although it is not the earliest conflict, the first war for which there is any detailed evidence occurred between Lagash and Umma in 2525 B.C., two Sumerian cities located eighteen miles apart.
  • Around 4000 B.C. city-states began to develope  in ancient Mesopotamia. With their growth, conflicts developed among them. Warfare often arose as the result of wealth, control of the Tigris and Euphrates for transportation and irrigation, boundary disputes, and the need to acquire luxury goods such as timber, stone and metals. Although it is not the earliest conflict, the first war for which there is any detailed evidence occurred between Lagash and Umma in 2525 B.C., two Sumerian cities located eighteen miles apart.
  • Around 4000 B.C. city-states began to develope  in ancient Mesopotamia. With their growth, conflicts developed among them. Warfare often arose as the result of wealth, control of the Tigris and Euphrates for transportation and irrigation, boundary disputes, and the need to acquire luxury goods such as timber, stone and metals. Although it is not the earliest conflict, the first war for which there is any detailed evidence occurred between Lagash and Umma in 2525 B.C., two Sumerian cities located eighteen miles apart.
  • Around 4000 B.C. city-states began to develope  in ancient Mesopotamia. With their growth, conflicts developed among them. Warfare often arose as the result of wealth, control of the Tigris and Euphrates for transportation and irrigation, boundary disputes, and the need to acquire luxury goods such as timber, stone and metals. Although it is not the earliest conflict, the first war for which there is any detailed evidence occurred between Lagash and Umma in 2525 B.C., two Sumerian cities located eighteen miles apart.
  • Econ rev sk

    1. 1. Ms. FayadChapter One: “The Peopling of the World” (4,000,000 B.C. – 2,500 B.C.)
    2. 2. Paleolithic to Neolithic BEFORE NEOLITHIC  NEOLITHIC PERIOD 12,000 BCE  5,000 BCE  world pop.: 8 million  world pop.: 100 million  all people were nomads  most people farmers and and hunter-gathers live in villages  earth’s temperature  earth’s rising cooler, cycle of Ice temperature allows for Ages longer growing seasons  more big game animals  animals not hunted, but  societies smaller, more domesticated for human equal use (dogs, cattle, goat, pig)  larger societies, gap in power and wealth grows
    3. 3. Chapter One: “The Peopling of the World”I. Human Origins in Africa (Lecture Notes continued) Stone Agesa. Lasted from about 2.5 million B.C. to 8,000 B.C.1. Old Stone Age (Paleolithic Age)b. Oldest stone tools date back to this period.c. All 5 types of early man date back to this period Australopithecine, Homo Habilis, Homo Erectus, both Homo Sapiens (Neanderthal & Cro Magnon) … All early man were Hunter-Gatherers !
    4. 4. CHAPTER 1: Early Human Origins to The Neotlithic Revolution to the Birth of CivilizationMillions 3 2 1 BC 0 ADof years ago Australopithecine Afarensis Homo Australopithecine Homo Homo Sapiens Africanus Habilis Erectus “Lucy”
    5. 5. Life in the Ice AgeWoolly Mammoth roamed and men and women were nomads andhunted and gathered for their food. World temperatures were slightlycooler, about 3 – 5 degrees cooler.
    6. 6. Neolithic Revolution
    7. 7. Chapter One: “The Peopling of the World” But then came a Revolution (a great change) in human behavior. Agriculture! 2. New Stone Age (Neolithic Age) a. Lasted from about 8,000 B.C. to 3,000 B.C. Modern Man is from this period b. Advanced tools, ability to make pottery, domestication of animals c. Neolithic Revolution – great change in human behavior when humans shifted from hunting-gathering to growing their own food; raised crops (agriculture) *Important consequence of the Neolithic Revolution is in flood plains with fertile soil, rich harvests led to the rise of the first civilizations. Revolution – means a dramatic transformation (change in behavior), usually requiring great effort, but producing long-lasting changes. i.e. Agricultural Revolution, Industrial Revolution, American Revolution
    8. 8. When Global Warming Was GoodEnd of the last Ice Age and warming temperatures led to longergrowing seasons and the extinction of the big game animals such aswoolly mammoth. Farmers, such as these women in Southeast Asiacould now live off the land and lead more settled lives.
    9. 9. The Great Wall of China The farmer Chinese built a great wall to protect themselves from the Central Asian nomads (Huns, Mongols, etc.)
    10. 10. 2. New Stone Age (Neolithic Age)Hint:One of the twoEssay “led to”Questions on Cause EffectTest --Pre-AP Why is this Neolithic Revolution important? • In order to grow crops, humans will have to “settle down” ! and wait for the seeds / crops to grow. • “Settling down” meant the first human settlements (villages and later, cities!) • Once settled, humans tamed animals (goats, cattle, pigs, sheep) > used as beasts of burden, sources of meat protein, milk, hides and fibers for protective clothing. • Better diet & food surpluses (grain storage) > increased birth rates, decreased infant mortality rates, increased life expectancies > population explosion > large civilizations. “led to” • Put simply, because humans finally settled down… the Neolithic Revolution (Agriculture) led to
    11. 11. Civilization! No longer hunting-gathering nomads, humans now began a settled way of life. These human “settlements” became “villages” became “towns” became “cities”….in other words, civilizations arose. UrSW Asia(the Middle East) Fertile Crescent
    12. 12. [Handout] THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION: • Uruk– population of about 10,000, A. Advanced Cities (UR • Lagesh – population of about 19,000 is the earliest human • Umma – population of about 16,000 civilization Sumerian city life
    13. 13. THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION:• Uruk – population of about 10,000• Lagesh – population of about 19,000 A. advanced Cities• Umma – population of about 16,000• Formal governments with officials and laws• Priests with both religious and political power B.
    14. 14. THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION: • Uruk – population of about 10,000 • Lagesh – population of about 19,000 A. advanced Cities • Umma – population of about 16,000 • Formal governments with officials and laws • Priests with both religious and political power • A rigorous education system for training scribes. B. organized Institutions• By 3,000 B.C., the Sumerians had developed the wheel, the plow, sewers, and the sailboat.• Bronze weapons and body armor that gave the Sumerians a military C. advantage over their enemies.This heavy goldhelmet (right)isexquisitelyengraved toreproduce thecurls of his hairand the bun at theback of his head.Royal Cemeteryof Ur, about 2500 Sumerian clay fragment clearlyB.C. Iraq depicting bronze helmets and evenMuseum, early phalanx formation.Baghdad. Spear throwers wearing helmets
    15. 15. THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION: • Uruk – population of about 10,000 • Lagesh – population of about 19,000 A. advanced Cities • Umma – population of about 16,000 • Formal governments with officials and laws • Priests with both religious and political power • A rigorous education system for training scribes. B. organized Institutions• By 3,000 B.C., the Sumerians had developed the wheel, the plow, sewers and the sailboat.• Bronze weapons and body armor that gave the Sumerians a military C. advantage over their enemies.• Engineered construction of ziggurats (huge tiered pyramid-shaped temple monuments)
    16. 16. THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION: • Uruk – population of about 10,000 • Lagesh – population of about 19,000 A. advanced Cities • Umma – population of about 16,000 • Formal governments with officials and laws • Priests with both religious and political power • A rigorous education system for training scribes. B. organized Institutions• By 3,000 B.C., the Sumerians had developed the wheel, the plow, sewers, and the sailboat.• Bronze weapons and body armor that gave the Sumerians a military C. Technology advantage over their enemies.• Engineered construction of ziggurats (huge tiered pyramid-shaped temple monuments) Bronze-Age Weapons Wheel Sailboat Sumerian Achievements Plow Sewers Engineered construction of Ziggurats
    17. 17. THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION: • Uruk – population of about 10,000 • Lagesh – population of about 19,000 A. advanced Cities • Umma – population of about 16,000 • Formal governments with officials and laws • Priests with both religious and political power • A rigorous education system for training scribes. B. organized Institutions• By 3,000 B.C., the Sumerians had developed the wheel, the plow, sewers, and the sailboat.• Bronze weapons and body armor that gave the Sumerians a military C. Technology advantage over their enemies.• Engineered construction of ziggurats• Sumeria had artisans (skilled workers who make goods by hand) – i. e., metalworkers, weavers, potters, tanners D.
    18. 18. THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION: • Uruk – population of about 10,000 • Lagesh – population of about 19,000 A. advanced Cities • Umma – population of about 16,000 • Formal governments with officials and laws • Priests with both religious and political power • A rigorous education system for training scribes. B. organized Institutions• By 3,000 B.C., the Sumerians had developed the wheel, the plow, sewers, and the sailboat.• Bronze weapons and body armor that gave the Sumerians a military C. Technology advantage over their enemies.• Engineered construction of ziggurats• Sumeria had artisans (skilled workers who make goods by hand) – i. e., metalworkers, weavers, potters, tanners D.• Farmers and merchants engaged in trade of their goods• Those trained to be priests, soldiers, teachers, government officials, and scribes. Scribes recording transactions in the city market.
    19. 19. THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION: • Uruk – population of about 10,000 • Lagesh – population of about 19,000 A. advanced Cities • Umma – population of about 16,000 • Formal governments with officials and laws • Priests with both religious and political power • A rigorous education system for training scribes. B. organized Institutions• By 3,000 B.C., the Sumerians had developed the wheel, the plow, sewers, and the sailboat.• Bronze weapons and body armor that gave the Sumerians a military C. Technology advantage over their enemies.• Engineered construction of ziggurats• Sumeria had artisans (skilled workers who make goods by hand) – i. e., metalworkers, weavers, potters, tanners D. specialized Workers• Farmers and merchants engaged in trade of their goods• Those trained to be priests, soldiers, teachers, government officials, and scribes.
    20. 20. THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION: • Uruk – population of about 10,000 • Lagesh – population of about 19,000 A. advanced Cities • Umma – population of about 16,000 • Formal governments with officials and laws • Priests with both religious and political power • A rigorous education system for training scribes. B. organized Institutions• By 3,000 B.C., the Sumerians had developed the wheel, the plow, sewers, and the sailboat.• Bronze weapons and body armor that gave the Sumerians a military C. Technology advantage over their enemies.• Engineered construction of ziggurats• Sumeria had artisans (skilled workers who make goods by hand) – i. e., metalworkers, weavers, potters, tanners D. specialized Workers• Farmers and merchants engaged in trade of their goods• Those trained to be priests, soldiers, teachers, government officials, and scribes.• Cuneiform tablets found in Sumeria record business transactions, historical events from their past, their traditions and customs. E. Record-keeping
    21. 21. THE FIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A CIVILIZATION: • Uruk – population of about 10,000 • Lagesh – population of about 19,000 A. advanced Cities-(UR • Umma – population of about 16,000 UR- earliest human civilization) • Formal governments with officials and laws • Priests with both religious and political power • A rigorous education system for training scribes. B. organized Institutions• By 3,000 B.C., the Sumerians had developed the wheel, the plow, sewers, and the sailboat.• Bronze weapons and body armor that gave the Sumerians a military C. Technology advantage over their enemies.• Engineered construction of ziggurats• Sumeria had artisans (skilled workers who make goods by hand) – i. e., metalworkers, weavers, potters, tanners D. specialized Workers• Farmers and merchants engaged in trade of their goods• Those trained to be priests, soldiers, teachers, government officials, and scribes.• Cuneiform tablets found in Sumeria record business transactions, historical events from their past, their traditions and customs. E. Record-keeping A civilization is a complex culture that has developed, over time, these five characteristics. (Textbook, p. 18)

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