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  • During political campaigns, we often hear pundits on television talk about one candidate’s “message.” In essence, a message is a framework in which we talk about an issue. In some circles, it’s also called “framing” or “positioning.” There are at least a dozen different ways we could talk about any single issue. But usually, we don’t have time to go over every single angle. And sometimes, we disagree with the way some issues are discussed. This is where message comes in. Our message is the one, two or three ways we choose to talk about an issue. It reflects our values and our priorities and makes our point to an audience.

Transcript

  • 1. Message and Media Training: How to build a message and stick to it Public Relations Workshop
  • 2. Topics for this afternoon
    • Message and Audience
    • Building Relationships with the Media
    • Tools of the Trade
    • Learning to Talk to the Media
  • 3. Building a Message
  • 4. Who’s Listening?
    • Determining your audience is one of the most important steps to successfully delivering your message
    • Who are you trying to persuade?
    • External Audience = parents, elected officials, policymakers, news media, business and community leaders, ordinary citizens/taxpayers, senior citizens w/o kids.
    • Internal Audience = members, teachers, ESPs, prospective members, association leadership, allies, and “friends.”
    The question isn’t so much about what you want to say to them…rather, ask what do you want them to do? What do you want them to believe?
  • 5. What’s Important?
    • Values Map
    • Use Language to Speak to “Me” and “My Own.”
    • Be specific and use examples
    • For example:
      • If parents, talk about “your child”
      • If voters, talk about “your schools”
      • If legislators, talk about “your voters”
      • If prospective members, talk about “your benefits” or “your working conditions”
    “ Me” (in the middle) “ Mine” (next ring) “ Ours” (society/outside) The closer you are to “me” the closer you are to relevant.
  • 6. External vs Internal Messages
    • External Audience = parents, elected officials, policymakers, news media, business and community leaders, ordinary citizens/taxpayers, senior citizens w/o kids.
    • Internal Audience = members, teachers, ESPs, prospective members, association leadership, allies, and “friends.”
  • 7.
    • Just a catchy slogan, jingle, or tagline.
    • “ Dumbing down” an issue to reach an audience.
    • A “magic bullet” solution.
    • A script.
    • A “shot in the dark.”
    What a message isn’t...
  • 8.
    • Represent your values
    • Speak to people in their language
    • Connect your vision and values, with those of your audience.
    • Be positive, not negative
    • Built on GOOD WORDS
    • Research based
    Your message should:
  • 9.
    • The one, two or three ways we want to talk about an issue.
    • It reflects our values and our priorities.
    • It makes a point and is true and believable.
    • Resonates with the target audience.
    What is a “message” and what does a message do?
  • 10. We must provide teachers and education support professionals with resources and tools to get the job done. We need to create enthusiasm in school and engage students. Shared responsibility and mutual respect will together produce results that will help students succeed in the future. The world is changing and we have to change too. Great Public Schools Are A Basic Right For Every Child. “ Change” “ Tools and Resources” “ Engage Students” “ 3 More Rs”
  • 11. How Do I Use the Message?
    • Make it your own.
    • The message box is the framework for your message.
    • The build out of the box is yours.
    • No matter what the topic or issue, you can use the message box to “frame” it.
    • Remember: the concepts attached to each of the four sides of the box are what tested highest.
  • 12. When do I use the message?
    • Use it all the time. In all of your communication.
    • Get buy-in from the folks that matter; message leadership from the top.
    • Reinforce 24/7/365. Anytime, anywhere is a good time to “message.”
    • Reject, recall, replace any “off message” communication.
    • Review all collateral and Web site.
    • Keep current and keep revising.
  • 13. Where do I use the message?
    • Media interviews
    • Press Releases
    • Talking Points
    • Networking and Social Gatherings
    • Meet and Greets
    • Collateral
    • Email Signature
    • Voicemail message
    • PowerPoint Presentations
    • Videos
    • Ads
    • Membership calls
    • Wallet cards
    • Website
    • Speeches
    • Conferences/Conventions
  • 14. Tips for staying “on message.”
    • Have a brief, simple message.
    • Give it to everyone to help spread the cause.
    • Memorize it; use tools (box, triangle, talking points) that work for you.
    • Frame all issues by using the core message.
    • Love your message box!
  • 15. Message Discipline
    • Keep your message simple and repeat it often
    • If you’re not sick of your message, you’re not saying it enough
    • STAY on message
    • Thank and spank
  • 16.