Reef Fish Sampling in theReef Fish Sampling in the
Florida KeysFlorida Keys
by:by: Danielle MorleyDanielle Morley
Edited f...
Coral reef managers aroundCoral reef managers around
the world have similarthe world have similar
questions:questions:
• A...
This presentation gives a overview ofThis presentation gives a overview of
some current research projects in thesome curre...
FinfishFinfish ResearchResearch GroupGroup
Ocyurus chrysurus
yellowtail snapper
Commercially and RecreationallyCommercially and Recreationally
Important SpeciesImpor...
Location, location, location!Location, location, location!
Key West
Dry Tortugas
Florida
Cuba
Bahamas
Key Largo
Overview of the Finfish ProgramOverview of the Finfish Program
Several different programs study fish populationsSeveral di...
Seine SurveySeine Survey
21.3m offshore seine net
with 3.2mm mesh
Typical catch
Mutton snapper
Scientists count the fish found in shallow waterScie...
Reef VisualReef Visual
Census (RVC)Census (RVC)
Goal:Goal: Estimate population &Estimate population &
community make upcom...
Methods: Stratified RandomMethods: Stratified Random
15 m
5 minute count5 - 10 and >10
minute count
Stationary Point CountsStationary Point Counts
7.5 m
Fish Spawning AggregationFish Spawning Aggregation
(FSA) in the Dry Tortugas(FSA) in the Dry Tortugas
Lutjanus analisLutja...
Since 2008:
Yellowtail (18)
Mutton snapper (56)
Black grouper (36)
Fish Surgery???Fish Surgery???
Scientists must dive to
service receivers a
couple times a year.
Sampling areas covered by the receivers
included approxim...
83° 05’ 83° 00’ 82° 55’ 82° 50’
24°40’24°35’24°30’
L. analisL. analis – 69.2 cm– 69.2 cm
TNER
TSER
RNA
DRTO
May June July
...
No TakeNo Take
No
Take
Home Range Estimate
• Marine scientists will continue to collect data to
better understand the fisheries in the Florida Keys
National Marine S...
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Introduction for NOAA lesson by Susan Kaiser, TAS 2012: One Fish, Two Fish

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This Power Point introduces the work of marine scientists working for FWC and NOAA as they study fish migration patterns and population off the Florida Keys near the Dry Tortugas. The original presentation was written by Danielle Morley and edited by Susan Kaiser Teacher at Sea, 2012 for use with the lesson she developed called One Fish, Two Fish. All of the resources are available at the NOAA TAS website.

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  • Teacher note: Danielle Morley is one of the profiled marine scientists in the career exploration you can also use with your students at www.marinesciencecareers.weebly.com
  • These are real-world questions marine scientists are trying to answer. Many are basic research questions. Much of what happens under the sea is not yet known.
  • Marine scientists work in smaller groups within their own agency and with other agencies such as NOAA. This presentation is an overview of the research of Finfish division. Finfish are true fish with fins distinguished from shellfish.
  • Fishing is not only important as a source for food but also for sport and recreation. Florida is the fishing capital of the world. Saltwater recreational fishing alone generates $5.7 billion in economic impact and supports 54,500 jobs (2011 data). This is makes scientific information about these populations invaluable.
  • The research profiled in this presentation is specifically in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary shown here.
  • Teacher Note: Three methods used by the Finfish group to learn about the fish populations are described further with an emphasis on the Spawning Aggregation studies which is simulated in the lesson activity.
  • First sampling technique is used to assess fish found in shallow waters.
  • Scientists learned that the shallow water acts as a nursery for the smaller young fish. The mean size of the Mutton Snapper caught in the net was 35 mm (1.4 inches) They mature and become sexually active at 40 cm (16 inches) Teacher Note: This same species is the focus of the activity simulation but tracks the adults to their spawning grounds farther South.
  • In this is the second method, divers count fish directly. They visit known aquatic habitats where they are likely to see certain fish species. Details of the habitats are shown in the next slide.
  • This is a map of benthic habitats of the reef ecosystem located off of the lower Florida Keys. Here you can see different types of habitats. This allows scientists to focus their effort in areas where targeted fish are likely to be seen (aggregated patch reefs) and less effort to areas where there is less variability observed in fish densities, like seagrass environments of low relief hardbottom.
  • Teacher Note: this interactive slide shows the process used to visually count the fish. Scientists visualize a column of water this size and record on waterproof data sheets are species and numbers observed during a set time. Click through to show this simulation.
  • This is the third data collection technique. It relies on technology in the form of a surgically implanted tag in each fish and the deployment of a series of listening stations planted in the ocean.
  • Performing underwater surgery on fish allows scientists to implant a small acoustic tag (small black cylinders). This way fish movements can be tracked as they pass the listening stations (called VR2s) which are already in position on the ocean floor.
  • The left photo shows the diver setting a listening station in place to monitor the tagged fish that swim past. The listening stations are operated by batteries which must be replaced several time a year. Information is downloaded at that time.
  • Teacher Note: This slide shows the movement of a single Mutton Snapper as it moves from foraging to spawning grounds during different times of the year. Click through and ask students to following the path of the red & blue dot. Note the time of year and frequency of movements on the calendar bar above. This relates to the simulation activity the students will perform in class.
  • Teacher Note: Fish congregated in the “no take” areas where fishing is prohibited. However, scientists have learned that they are moving through a fishing area as they migrate from one area to the other. Therefore they are vulnerable during this time. This slide is also relevant to the simulation activity when students are making their recommendations .
  • Wrap up with questions about vocabulary and transition to the word wall activity. You can also ask students to find Florida on a world map and identify the Florida Keys and the Dry Tortugas.
  • Introduction for NOAA lesson by Susan Kaiser, TAS 2012: One Fish, Two Fish

    1. 1. Reef Fish Sampling in theReef Fish Sampling in the Florida KeysFlorida Keys by:by: Danielle MorleyDanielle Morley Edited for use at Pine Middle SchoolEdited for use at Pine Middle School by: Susan Kaiserby: Susan Kaiser NOAA Teacher at Sea 2012NOAA Teacher at Sea 2012 Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation CommissionFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Fish and Wildlife Research InstituteFish and Wildlife Research Institute South Florida Regional LaboratorySouth Florida Regional Laboratory 2796 Overseas Hwy; Suite 119; Marathon, FL 330502796 Overseas Hwy; Suite 119; Marathon, FL 33050
    2. 2. Coral reef managers aroundCoral reef managers around the world have similarthe world have similar questions:questions: • Are the coral reefs healthy?Are the coral reefs healthy? • What are the threats impacting coral reefs?What are the threats impacting coral reefs? • Are fish populations increasing orAre fish populations increasing or decreasing?decreasing? • Are management actions successful?Are management actions successful? • Is a marine protected area working?Is a marine protected area working? • What is the level of satisfaction of theWhat is the level of satisfaction of the resource users?resource users?
    3. 3. This presentation gives a overview ofThis presentation gives a overview of some current research projects in thesome current research projects in the Keys. It also prepares you for aKeys. It also prepares you for a simulation activity in class.simulation activity in class.
    4. 4. FinfishFinfish ResearchResearch GroupGroup
    5. 5. Ocyurus chrysurus yellowtail snapper Commercially and RecreationallyCommercially and Recreationally Important SpeciesImportant Species Mycteroperca bonaci black grouper Lutjanus analis mutton snapper Lutjanus griseus gray snapper
    6. 6. Location, location, location!Location, location, location! Key West Dry Tortugas Florida Cuba Bahamas Key Largo
    7. 7. Overview of the Finfish ProgramOverview of the Finfish Program Several different programs study fish populationsSeveral different programs study fish populations throughout the entire Florida Keys reef track and coveringthroughout the entire Florida Keys reef track and covering various life stages.various life stages. SeiningSeining ProgramProgram Spawning AggregationSpawning Aggregation StudiesStudies Reef VisualReef Visual CensusCensus
    8. 8. Seine SurveySeine Survey
    9. 9. 21.3m offshore seine net with 3.2mm mesh Typical catch Mutton snapper Scientists count the fish found in shallow waterScientists count the fish found in shallow water
    10. 10. Reef VisualReef Visual Census (RVC)Census (RVC) Goal:Goal: Estimate population &Estimate population & community make upcommunity make up Method:Method: Stratified Random Sampling Data Collected:Data Collected: • Showed >280 SpeciesShowed >280 Species • Included all fish life stages & sizesIncluded all fish life stages & sizes
    11. 11. Methods: Stratified RandomMethods: Stratified Random
    12. 12. 15 m 5 minute count5 - 10 and >10 minute count Stationary Point CountsStationary Point Counts 7.5 m
    13. 13. Fish Spawning AggregationFish Spawning Aggregation (FSA) in the Dry Tortugas(FSA) in the Dry Tortugas Lutjanus analisLutjanus analis mutton snappermutton snapper Mycteroperca bonaciMycteroperca bonaci black grouperblack grouper Ocyurus chrysurusOcyurus chrysurus yellowtail snapperyellowtail snapper •What are the population dynamics ofWhat are the population dynamics of those reef fishes in the Drythose reef fishes in the Dry Tortugas?Tortugas? •Are there spawning migrationAre there spawning migration patterns?patterns? •What type of fish movement occursWhat type of fish movement occurs between foraging grounds andbetween foraging grounds and spawning aggregation sitesspawning aggregation sites?? • How do fish use habitats of the reefHow do fish use habitats of the reef environments and how long do reefenvironments and how long do reef fishes stay in the region?fishes stay in the region?
    14. 14. Since 2008: Yellowtail (18) Mutton snapper (56) Black grouper (36) Fish Surgery???Fish Surgery???
    15. 15. Scientists must dive to service receivers a couple times a year. Sampling areas covered by the receivers included approximately 800km2 and are comprised of varying habitats. FSA Work in the Dry TortugasFSA Work in the Dry Tortugas
    16. 16. 83° 05’ 83° 00’ 82° 55’ 82° 50’ 24°40’24°35’24°30’ L. analisL. analis – 69.2 cm– 69.2 cm TNER TSER RNA DRTO May June July Spawning Corridor
    17. 17. No TakeNo Take No Take Home Range Estimate
    18. 18. • Marine scientists will continue to collect data to better understand the fisheries in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. • The new information they gather will help policy makers better manage these natural resources. • In the next class meeting, YOU will simulate the process used by scientists in the spawning aggregation study to add to their data set and make future recommendations to resource managers. Future Research…
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