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Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language
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Uxpa 2012 Intersection between Accessibility & Plain Language

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Using plain language rules to improve accessibility.

Using plain language rules to improve accessibility.

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Northwestern University, Services for Students with DisabilitiesEducation, http://www.northwestern.edu/disability/law.html
  • 2 An Institutional Perspective on Students with Disabilities in Postsecondary Center for Educational Statistics, Postsecondary Education Quick Information1999 (Taken from DO-IT Faculty Room Page, 12/12/08: http://www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty/Rights/Background/statistics.html)
  • National Center for Educational Statistics. [1999]. An institutional perspectivedisabilities in postsecondary education. Washington DC: U.S. Department offrom DO-IT Faculty Room Page, 12/12/08: http://www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty/Rights/Background/statistics.html
  • http://www.plainlanguage.gov/whatisPL/index.cfm
  • http://www.plainlanguage.gov/whatisPL/index.cfm
  • http://www.ryobi-sol.co.jp/visolve/en/transform5.html
  • http://www.ryobi-sol.co.jp/visolve/en/transform5.html
  • Transcript

    • 1. THE INTERSECTIONBETWEENACCESSIBILITY ANDPLAIN LANGUAGESUZI SHAPIRO, PHDINDIANA UNIVERSITY EAST 2012 UXPA JUNE 4-8 2012
    • 2. PlainAccessibility Language
    • 3. WHAT I DO
    • 4. I USED TO WRITE FORMYSELF!•What I would want to know•The way I was taught•To demonstrate my skills • organized • thoughtful • grammatically correct • no spelling errors.
    • 5. MY STUDENTS OFTENFAILED TO UNDERSTAND(OR REMEMBER)WHAT I HAD WRITTEN
    • 6. I BECAME MORE AWARE THATPeople do not READ the way we think that they do.They scan documents: Jump aroundLook for important or relevant words They QUIT if bored or confusedThey often ignore a large percentageof the information later in the document IF THEY READ IT AT ALL!
    • 7. WHY IS THIS HAPPENING?Can’t I just tell them it isrequired?
    • 8. BEHIND EVERY BEHAVIOR IS A REASON
    • 9. PEOPLE DON’T READBECAUSE THEY …Have “better” things to doHave different perspectivesAre confused by complex structureAre unfamiliar with jargon ridden language.Are affected by limited : • vision • mobility • ability to pay attention
    • 10. U.S. REHABILITATION ACTOF 1973Prohibits discriminationon the basis of disability.
    • 11. SECTION 504"No otherwise qualified [sic] individualwith a disability in the United Statesshall, solely by reasonof his/her [sic] disability,be excluded from the participation in,be denied the benefits of,or be subjected todiscriminationunder any program or activityreceiving federal financial assistance."
    • 12. NOT A BIG DEAL….How many people are therewho have a disabilitythat would limit their abilityto read a document?
    • 13. A“NOT QUITEREPRESENTIVE”SAMPLE
    • 14. NATIONAL STATISTICS(1999)Number of postsecondaryundergraduate studentsin the United Stateswho report having a disability6% of the student body
    • 15. SURVEY DATASix reporting schools,Approximately 2.5% of students5,976 of the 240,122 students
    • 16. WHAT KINDS OFDISABILITIESDO STUDENTSREPORT?
    • 17. DISABILITIESREPORTED BY STUDENTType of Disability %Learning disabilities 45.7%Mobility or orthopedic impairments 13.9%Health impairments 11.6%Mental illness or emotional disturbance 7.8%Hearing impairments 5.6%Blindness and visual impairments 4.4%Speech or language impairments 0.9%Other impairments 9.1%
    • 18. DISABILITIES NOTREPORTED BY STUDENTS?Common disabilities: Too tired Too busy Too stressedTo think clearly & attend to tasks.
    • 19. HOW CAN I BE SURE….I am communicating effectively?I am giving all studentsan equal opportunity to learn?I am not unintentionallycreating barriers?
    • 20. THE SOLUTIONResearch oncreating informationthat is accessibleand understandablefor the widest possible varietyof people.
    • 21. UNIVERSAL DESIGN
    • 22. HOW DO WE CREATE DOCUMENTSTHAT COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY? Simple is good!
    • 23. Plain Language
    • 24. PLAIN LANGUAGE GOALSHelp people to:• Find what they need• Understand what they find• Use what they find to meet their needs.
    • 25. HOW TO GET THERE!• Logical organization with the reader in mind• "You" and other pronouns• Active voice• Short sentences• Common, everyday words• Easy-to-read design features
    • 26. MYRECOMMENDATIONFOR A PROCESS
    • 27. STEP 1Determine your objectivesor outcomes
    • 28. STEP 2Ask yourself •“What are the questions someone should ask?”Then, at each point •“What is needed to continue?”
    • 29. STEP 3Put informationin an orderthat will• Answer frequently asked questions FIRST• Build information
    • 30. SAMPLE:ASSIGNMENT ORDERWhat is the name of the assignment?When is the assignment due?What am I supposed to learnfrom the assignment?What resources do I needto complete the assignment?What should I do first? Second? . . .How do I know thatthe assignment is complete?
    • 31. STEP 4Continue editingthe documentto eliminateCross out contentthat is not needed.essential forcompletion of the task.
    • 32. STEP 5IF APPROPRIATE…Number the partsin the orderthat they should becompleted.
    • 33. STEP 6Format for• Accessibility• Scanning
    • 34. WHY ?Facilitates online readinganduse of screen reading softwareHelps people tofind information quicklyOrganization assists peoplewith attention problems
    • 35. HOW?• Expectancy• Structure• Redundancy• Visibility
    • 36. EXPECTANCY:What information does the readerexpect to find in the document?– don’t guess, ASK! • Where do they expect to find it? • What do they expect it to be called?
    • 37. STRUCTURE:Use headings and subheadingsUse Document STYLES Heading levels (Not format changes)
    • 38. STRUCTURE:Replace paragraphswith bulleted listsNumbered lists for items • that must all be completed or • that must be done in sequence.
    • 39. REDUNDANCY:Put important information in several places
    • 40. REDUNDANCY:Use multiple types of coding – style, color, etc.
    • 41. MULTIPLE CODING WITHOUT HATCHING WITH HATCHING
    • 42. MULTIPLE CODING
    • 43. REDUNDANCY:Use imageswhen applicable
    • 44. VISIBILITY:CONTRAST Font Color Position
    • 45. LARGE FONT SIZE12 Point minimumfor print and online viewing14 point minimumfor low vision, children,or older people (Over 40)
    • 46. SIMPLE FONT STYLESan Serif Ariel VerdanaSerifTimes New RomanCentury Schoolbook
    • 47. AVOIDCombinations of RED and GREEN Or BLUE and YELLOW
    • 48. COLOR BLINDNESS Watch out ! for combinations that are hard to discriminate for people with color blindness Or anyone else….
    • 49. THE GOAL?Documents thatcan and willbe read andunderstoodby more people.
    • 50. PlainAccessibility Language
    • 51. CONTACT MESuzi Shapirosuzi@suzishapiro.com@afullmind

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