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Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
Preservation planning
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Preservation planning

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Talk on preservation planning given at the DPC / BLPAC 'Getting started in digital preservation' event at Glasgow University, 10th April 2013.

Talk on preservation planning given at the DPC / BLPAC 'Getting started in digital preservation' event at Glasgow University, 10th April 2013.

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  • Here’s a definition from the PLANETS project. This highlights that a plan is detailed series of steps for a given collection.
  • The definition from NEDCC helps to set plans in the wider process. You need to identify needs, set priorities and based on resources determine what will and won’t happen.
  • Preservation plans don’t stand in isolation. They’re defined by the wider context and involve a number of processes:Your preservation policy, collections remit and organisational mission will shape the content of preservation plans Restrictions affect what can be achieved e.g. legal obligations on what has to be kept and for how long, limited budget and technical constraints Requirements should be assessed first – what do users’ need, what collections do you hold and what state are they in, and what needs to be preserved i.e. what are the significant properties There are also a number of processes that accompany preservation planning e.g. characterising formats, monitoring changes in the technical environment to assess risks, and evaluation different options for preservation actions and the success of these
  • PrestoSpace was an audiovisual preservation project. They differentiate between preservation strategies and plans. The plans add specific details.
  • In the strategy you can see the type of material and it’s condition colour-coded to set priorities.Looking at the first example, the sound track master will be digitised immediately and the duplicates will be destroyed once they have been checked.
  • Here you see the same content types, but the preservation plan gives specifics on what actions will be undertaken, by whom and when. The expected outcome and how this will be validated are also listed.
  • The Parliamentary archives have an excellent preservation policy. Within this is a section on preserving content. They suggest there are three activities in a continuous cycle: Know what you have and what has to be preservedPlan for preservation which involves assessing risk, monitoring the technical environment, assessing impact by combining these two to set priorities, and generating plansUndertaking preservation actions and validating these
  • This spells out in more detail what’s involved in each step
  • The final example is PLATO, a preservation planning tool.PLATO helps you to evaluate different options to develop a sound plan.
  • Initially you define requirements which involves drawing in details of the wider context (what you hold, the technological environment, what users’ need and policies)You then evaluate alternative preservation actions to determine the best approach. This recommendation helps you to build a plan.PLATO is underpinned by a knowledgebase of existing plans and details of the wider environment to help you build a good plan.
  • These are the nine proposed components of a PLATO plan. It results in a concrete ‘preservation action plan’.
  • This is an example of applying PLATO to explain the kind of information captured.
  • From the three approaches you’ll see that there is no absolute approach to preservation planning. You should do what works for you. Scale things up and down to suit. The British Library, for example, used PLATO to determine the best approach for their large-scale newspaper digitisation programme. You may have small collections and less time so may need do something shorter/quicker/easier.Be aware of your context as this will influence the approach taken – preservation plans do not sit in isolation.Be realistic about what you can achieve. It’s no good having an exemplary plan if you don’t have the time and resources to deliver it. Be pragmatic and scale your approach appropriately.
  • In summary, here are the 12 questions you will use in the exercise set up by William Kilbride.These cover:the context: what you need to do, what you hold, organisational priorities / preferences practicalities: what preservation actions to follow, what tools to use... validation: what are the expected outcomes, how will these be quality assured, how will the plans be updated in light of this
  • Transcript

    • 1. Getting Started in Digital Preservation DPC & BLPAC, 10th April 2013, Glasgow #dpcblpac Preservation PlanningSarah JonesDigital Curation Centresarah.jones@glasgow.ac.ukTwitter: sjDCC
    • 2. Outline• Definitions and introduction• Example approaches - Prestospace - Parliamentary archives - PLANETS plato tool• Summary and conclusion
    • 3. What is a preservation plan? “A preservation plan defines a series of preservation actions to be taken by aresponsible institution due to an identified risk for a given set of digital objects or records (called collection).” www.ifs.tuwien.ac.at/dp/plato/intro_documentation.html
    • 4. What is preservation planning?• A process by which the general and specific needs for the care of collections are determined, priorities are established, and resources for implementation are identified.• Its main purpose is to define a course of action that will allow an institution to set its present and future preservation agendas.• In addition, it identifies the actions an institution will take and those it probably will never take so that resources can be allocated appropriately.www.nedcc.org/resources/leaflets/1Planning_and_Prioritizing/01WhatIsPreservationPlanning.php
    • 5. Plans in the wider environment POLICY PARAMETERS / RESTRICTIONS - preservation policy - legal obligations - collections remit - resources / budget - organisational mission - technical constraints Preservation PlanASSESSING REQUIREMENTS UNDERLYING PROCESSES - analysing user needs - format characterisation - collection surveys - monitoring environment and risks - preservation objectives - evaluation / assessment
    • 6. Outline• Definitions and introduction• Example approaches - Prestospace - Parliamentary archives - PLANETS plato tool• Summary and conclusion
    • 7. Preservation strategies and plans• A preservation strategy is a schedule of actions for every type of content in your collection. The preservation plan adds the specifics.• The main new information in a preservation plan (as compared with a strategy) is: - the exact specification of the digital object to be made - who will make it - how long the process will take
    • 8. BBC 16mm film collection examplePreservation strategyhttp://wiki.prestospace.org/pmwiki.php?n=Main.PresPlan
    • 9. BBC 16mm film collection examplePreservation planhttp://wiki.prestospace.org/pmwiki.php?n=Main.PresPlan
    • 10. Content preservation process Comprises three activities in a continuous cycle:www.parliament.uk/documents/upload/digitalpreservationpolicy1.0.pdf
    • 11. Content Preservation process (2)Characterise• Understand the technical characteristics of the content that you hold• Define significant properties to determine what needs to be preservedPlan• Identify and monitor technological changes and their potential impact• Develop preservation strategies to mitigate the impact of these changes• Define the precise steps required to perform the preservation actions• Set the relevant success criteria (based on significant properties)• Determine the urgency of preservation action to decide when to actAct• Undertake preservation actions• Validate that the preservation plan has been executed successfully
    • 12. Plato – a preservation planning tool• Plato was developed by the PLANETS project• It aims to help you find the “right action to enable future access to digital content in a transparent way” www.ifs.tuwien.ac.at/dp/plato/intro.html
    • 13. Plato workflow
    • 14. Elements of a PLATO preservation plan• Identification• Status and triggers• Description of the institutional setting• Description of the collection• Requirements for preservation• Evidence of decision for a preservation strategy• Costs• Roles and responsibilities• Preservation action plan(Becker et al, 2009)
    • 15. Slide courtesy of Caroline Peach, BLPAC
    • 16. Basic advice• Approaches differ – do what works best for you• Be aware of the broader context / environment - this will inform your preservation plans• Identify priorities and be realistic about what you can achieve
    • 17. Preservation planning in 12 questions1. Why do we want to keep this stuff?2. For whom are we keeping it? How do we test their expectations?3. What are our preferred preservation approaches?4. What is the collection? How does it break down?5. What risks do the different parts of the collection face?6. What are the highest priorities for action?7. What actions should we take to meet them?8. What tools do we have available to carry them out?9. What are our constraints in terms of cost / resources?10. What are our expectations of quality?11. How will we validate our plans? This is what12. How and when will we update our plans? you’ll cover in the exercise
    • 18. Thanks – any questions?Sarah JonesDigital Curation Centresarah.jones@glasgow.ac.ukTwitter: sjDCC

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