CARDIO

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A benchmarking tool developed by the DCC to assess research data infrastructure. The presentation also outlines alternative versions developed by the University of the West of England and an EPSRC-compliance version

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CARDIO

  1. 1. CARDIO: Collaborative Assessment of Research Data Infrastructures and Objectives Sarah Jones DCC, University of Glasgow sarah.jones@glasgow.ac.uk
  2. 2. Overview of Presentation 1. Background and purpose 2. CARDIO tool 3. How CARDIO has been used
  3. 3. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE
  4. 4. Background • A tool commissioned by Jisc to integrate elements of other RDM management tools • Builds heavily on AIDA (Assessing Institutional Digital Assets), re-focusing concept on RDM • http://aida.da.ulcc.ac.uk/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
  5. 5. CARDIO – Primary Goals • CARDIO is a tool to assess research data infrastructure and support • It uses the concept of maturity, asking different stakeholders to rate provision on a 1-5 scale • CARDIO is collaborative – the aim is to get multiple viewpoints to identify discrepancies and reach consensus
  6. 6. CARDIO – RDM Maturity • Assess a ‘data context’ – a place where data is created and managed (e.g. department, school, project, funding stream, institution...) • How well can it/does it manage its data? • That’s dependent on: – Finances – Technology – Policy and procedures – Organisational will – Skills…
  7. 7. Five stages of maturity Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Stage 5 ACKNOWLEDGE / NO ACTION ACT / LOCALISED CONSOLIDATE / CO-OPERATE INSTITUTIONALISE / INTEGRATE EXTERNALISE / EMBED Diagram courtesy of Ed Pinsent, AIDA project
  8. 8. CARDIO – Three “Legs” Concept • Organisation: Policy, legality, mandates… • Technology: Servers, data validation, security… • Resources: Staffing, finance, risk… 3 leg stool model developed by University of Cornell
  9. 9. Full coverage of CARDIO (1) ORGANISATION • Data ownership and management • Data policy and procedures • Data policy review • Sharing of / access to research data • Preservation and continuity of research • Internal audit of research activities • Monitoring and feedback of publication • Metadata management • Legal compliance • IPR and rights management • Disaster planning and continuity of research
  10. 10. Full coverage of CARDIO (2) TECHNOLOGY • Technological infrastructure • Appropriate technologies • Ensuring availability • Managing data integrity • Obsolescence • Managing technological change • Security provisions • Security processes • Metadata tools • Institutional repository
  11. 11. Full coverage of CARDIO (3) RESOURCES • Data management costs and sustainability • Business planning • Technological resources allocation • Risk management • Transparency of resource allocation • Sustainability of funding for RDM and preservation • Data management skills • Number of staff for RDM • Staff development opportunities
  12. 12. CARDIO TOOL
  13. 13. CARDIO – Who’s Involved • CARDIO Coordinators: those propelling the process, mediating between… • Infrastructural providers: providing services to support research data management • Researchers: interested in safeguarding their research data, but also defined by their responsibilities
  14. 14. CARDIO – Principal Workflow • Individually score a range of areas within each conceptual leg • Collate scores and negotiate to reach a collective consensus view • Plan for improvements in RDM, based on evidence, visualisations and future recommendations
  15. 15. Stages of CARDIO
  16. 16. Providing maturity ratings
  17. 17. Assessing responses • Visualisations reveal various contributors’ responses • Enables publication of PDF report with itemised maturity
  18. 18. HOW CARDIO HAS BEEN USED
  19. 19. CARDIO-lite: mini quiz • Short version put together for Jisc Inform • Asks 9 questions with A, B, C responses • Provides a basic indication of key gaps http://cardio.dcc.ac.uk/quiz www.dcc.ac.uk/sites/default/files/documents/Dundee -roadshow/Exercise-1-CARDIO-quiz.pdf
  20. 20. CARDIO workshops • Usually conducted after the mini-quiz or some CARDIO assessments have been done • Allows you to present main findings and reach consensus via discussion in groups • Provides an opportunity to prioritise recommendations
  21. 21. UWE 2 page matrix • 2 page matrix which is easy to give out in workshops or meetings • Quick to fill in by circling statement you agree with • Helped UWE begin policy discussions and start to develop and RDM strategy Available to download at: www1.uwe.ac.uk/library/usingthelibrary/servicesforresearchers/datamanagement/man agingresearchdata/projectoutputs/phase1.aspx
  22. 22. EPSRC profile of CARDIO • Adapts the UWE matrix and re-works it in line with the nine expectations of EPSRC • Useful for benchmarking progress towards the EPSRC roadmap deadline of May 2015 • www.dcc.ac.uk/sites/default/files/documents/events /EPSRC-workshop/CARDIO_matrix_EPSRC.pdf
  23. 23. Benefits of CARDIO • Good in conjunction with DAF – DAF more focused on researcher practice – CARDIO assesses infrastructure and support provision • A less resource-intensive methodology to implement • Useful as a benchmark to repeat and demonstrate organisational progress and change
  24. 24. Tips on implementation • People don’t always want to use online tools – sometimes they desire F2F interactions • Could blend the different approaches • Make sure you get multiple viewpoints as there will inevitably be differences of opinion
  25. 25. Discussion • Could you see a use for CARDIO at Reading? • What infrastructure and services do you already have in place to support RDM? • What do you think the biggest gaps are?

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