Sound insulation experiment

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Sound insulation experiment

  1. 1. An Experiment On Effectiveness of different materials on sound insulation<br />CC2007 Environmental Science (Group Presentation)<br />Group Members:<br /><ul><li>Wong Wai Sum , Sum (09081555A)
  2. 2. Li Hong Bin , Ben (10034164A)
  3. 3. LukWai Man , Ray (10094530A)
  4. 4. Lau CheokHei, Jeff (09090889A)
  5. 5. KanKaHim , Ken (10022177A)</li></li></ul><li>Content<br />Background Introduction<br />Experiment Objective<br />Experiment Procedure<br />Result <br />Analysis<br />Further development<br />Q & A<br />
  6. 6. What is noise?<br />Noise can be a very Loud sound<br />Low-level sound but annoying<br />
  7. 7. Loud Noise in Hong Kong<br />The main concern of noise :Traffic Noise<br />It affects more than one million people<br />655 roads generate noise greater than 70 dB<br /> But only 101 of these roads applied barriers<br />
  8. 8. What can we do personally?<br />Choose some good sound insulating materials to build your flat.<br />Today, we are going to test which materials (commonly seen in our daily lives) are good at insulating sound !<br />
  9. 9. Sound Insulation Experiment<br />Objective <br />To compare the sound insulation ‘s effectiveness of different materials under different frequencies in term of Sound Reduction Index(R) and Transmitted coefficient (T).<br />
  10. 10. Materials to be tested…<br />(1)the Expandable Polystyrene (EPS) foam<br />(2)stainless steel<br />(3)wood<br />(4)A4 paper<br />
  11. 11. What is sound??<br />Sound is a mechanical wave <br /><ul><li>also a kind of longitudinal wave which does not have Polarization(偏震)</li></ul>produced by vibrations of objects<br />require medium for propagation<br /> example: air, water<br />cannot travel in vacuum<br />
  12. 12. Where the sound from?<br />Can be found easily in our daily life<br />For example,<br />Musical instrument<br />Car<br />Talking<br />Aircraft take-off<br />
  13. 13. Sound Insulation<br />Insulate the sound we don’t want to hear<br />The ability for the material to reduce the sound energy transmitted into an adjoining air space.<br />Type of sound insulation:<br />Airborne Sound Insulation<br />Impact Sound Insulation<br />
  14. 14. Airborne Sound Insulation<br />the insulation against noise originating in air, e.g. voices, music, motor traffic, wind.<br />Impact Sound Insulation<br />the insulation against noise originating directly on a structure by blows or vibration <br />
  15. 15. Insulated the sound by mean of …<br />reflection<br />absorption<br />Sound would reflect at the surface of material so that only a part of sound energy will be transmitted. <br />Also, material will absorbs the sound energy and dissipates in form of heat making the reduction of transmission of sound.<br />result in reduction in sound level<br />
  16. 16. Decibel meter<br />using a decibel meter, we can measure the sound level (in dB) of different sound source. <br />sound level (L)<br /> L = 10 log10 [ I/I0 ]…………………(1)<br />sound reduction index (R):<br /> R = 10 log10 [ 1 / T ] (dB)…………(2)<br /> T: Transmitted sound energy / Incident sound energy<br />
  17. 17. Sound Insulation Experiment<br />Apparatus:<br />
  18. 18. <ul><li>Dimension of the shoe box = 29cm x 19cm x11cm = 6061cm3
  19. 19. Area of the opened part = 19cm x 11cm = 209cm2</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Frequencies chosen:
  20. 20. Materials used:</li></li></ul><li>Sound Insulation Experiment<br />Procedure:<br />Cut out one side of the shoe box and place the cloths inside the box.<br />Set up the apparatus following the sequence from A to D as shown in Fig. 1.1.<br />
  21. 21. 3. Turn on the speaker and generate a frequency of 125Hz (f1).<br />4. Measure the sound level (L0) using the sound meter and record it in Table 1.1.<br />5. Put the Expandable Polystyrene (EPS) foam (material 1) in front of the shoe box to cover the opened part of the box.<br />6. Measure the sound level (L1) for three times using the sound meter and record them in Table 1.1.<br />
  22. 22. 7. Repeat steps 2 to 5 for the remaining measurements using other frequency and material.<br />8. Calculate the average sound level (Laverage= (L1+L2+L3)/3), Sound Reduction Index (R) and transmitted coefficient (T) for different material under different frequency using equation (2).<br />9. Draw bar charts to show the relation between R/T and different frequencies for different materials.<br />
  23. 23. Result and Discussion:<br />
  24. 24. So, the greater the R, <br />the greater the Sound <br />Reduction Level is.<br />
  25. 25. So, the smaller the T, <br />the greater the<br />Sound Reduction <br />Level is.<br />
  26. 26. Analysis:<br /><ul><li>Assumption:
  27. 27. The unique sound source for the experiment is the frequency generator.
  28. 28. The background noise during the experiment is kept constant.
  29. 29. The reflection and refraction effects of sound are negligible.</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Sources of error:
  30. 30. Unstable readings of decibel meter
  31. 31. Impact sound can transmit through the ground to the box due to the vibration of speaker.
  32. 32. For the sound transmitted through the material , the sound wave can be reflected inside the shoe box, which may be noise, and it may affect the reading.</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>The background noise may not be constant though out the experiment.
  33. 33. Maximum possible error of the measurement = 0.05dB x 2 = 0.1dB</li></li></ul><li>In Our Experiment<br />Conclusion:<br /><ul><li>The greater the R, the greater the Sound Reduction Level is. </li></ul>( R↑->Reduction Level↑)<br /><ul><li>The smaller the T, the greater the Sound Reduction Level is.</li></ul>( T↓-> Reduction Level↑)<br /><ul><li>The most effective sound insulation material :</li></ul>Steel board (2mm)<br /><ul><li>The least effective sound insulation material :</li></ul>EPS foam (18mm), A4 paper - 50pcs (5mm)<br />
  34. 34. Some Professional Insulation Materials<br />features & benefits:<br /><ul><li>high performance soundproofing material for reducing airborne noise.
  35. 35. may be used behind drywall in wall and ceiling assemblies or sandwiched between existing and new drywall.
  36. 36. use in flooring systems to increase sound transmission class.
  37. 37. used for both residential and commercial soundproofing applications.</li></ul>QUIET BARRIER® HDSuperior soundproofing material for blocking noise for residential and commercial use.<br />
  38. 38. features & benefits:<br /><ul><li>cost-effective, low-profile sound blocking barrier
  39. 39. designed to reduce noise transmission in wall, floor & ceiling assemblies
  40. 40. replaces lead sheeting
  41. 41. available in sheets, rolls and "peel & stick" versions</li></ul>QUIET BARRIER® MDEconomical soundproofing material for blocking noise for residential and commercial use.<br />
  42. 42. Comparison on QUIET BARRIER® HD & QUIET BARRIER® MD<br />
  43. 43. features & benefits:<br /><ul><li>blocks and absorbs noise while reducing structural vibrations
  44. 44. great for engine compartments and equipment closures where moderate noise blocking is required
  45. 45. easy to cut for custom installations
  46. 46. may be used behind drywall
  47. 47. available with peel and stick adhesive backing</li></ul>QUIET BARRIER® LD CompositeAcoustical vinyl barrier composite for blocking sound.<br />
  48. 48. features & benefits:<br /><ul><li>blocks and absorbs noise while reducing structural vibrations
  49. 49. great for engine compartments and equipment enclosures
  50. 50. available with peel and stick adhesive backing</li></ul>QUIET BARRIER® MD CompositeAcoustical vinyl barrier composite.<br />
  51. 51. features & benefits:<br /><ul><li>heavy duty noise blocking, decoupling and sound absorption in one composite material
  52. 52. available with peel and stick adhesive backing for easy installation
  53. 53. excellent material for machine and engine enclosures and compressor rooms</li></ul>QUIET BARRIER® HD CompositeMost effective acoustical vinyl barrier composite for blocking sound.<br />
  54. 54. Comparison on LD Composite, MD Composite, HD Composite<br />
  55. 55. Other insulation materials<br />
  56. 56. Examples of floor system<br />
  57. 57. Examples of wall system<br />
  58. 58. Measures of soundproofing at home<br />Paints the wall with latex paints<br /><ul><li>reduce sound</li></ul>Install carpets on the floor<br /><ul><li>absorb sound</li></ul>Install drapes or shutters on the windows<br /><ul><li>absorb sound</li></ul>Soft furniture<br /><ul><li>dampen sound waves</li></li></ul><li>Solid doors<br />keep sound out of individual rooms<br />install a clear window film<br />provide a soundproofing buffer<br />rearrange furniture<br />E.g. place a filled bookshelf <br /> against a particularly noisy wall<br />decorate room with rough <br /> surface finishings<br />effect multiple distortion to the propagation of the wave<br />
  59. 59. Q & A<br />
  60. 60. Reference<br />“How to Soundproof: Basic Principles”. Noise Help. 22 February, 2011<br /> <http://www.noisehelp.com/how-to-soundproof.html><br />“Frequency-Dependent Sound Absorption”. Science Buddies. 28 February,2011<br /> <http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Phys_p029.shtml><br />“Transmission of Sound” City University of Hong Kong. 1 March,2011<br /> <http://personal.cityu.edu.hk/~bsapplec/transmis.htm><br />“Explore... Home Improvement: How Sound Insulations Work” Trans4mind Ltd.<br /> 1 March , 2011<br /> < http://www.trans4mind.com/explore/home-improvement/19620.html ><br />The Sound Solution – Soundproofing Materials & Sound Proofing Products<br /> <https://www.noisestopsystems.co.uk/><br />How to soundproof a room<br /> <http://www.howtoall.com/Homefiles/howtosoundproofaroom8.htm><br />How to Soundproof Rooms in a House<br /> <http://www.ehow.com/how_1000181_soundproof-a-room.html#ixzz1FyklcYCp><br />
  61. 61. Reference<br />“Sound Blocking Products – QUIET BARRIER® HD” . Soundproof Foam. 9 March, 2011<br /> <http://www.soundprooffoam.com/quiet-barrier.html><br />“Sound Blocking Products – QUIET BARRIER® MD” . Soundproof Foam. 9 March, 2011<br /> <http://www.soundprooffoam.com/econo-barrier.html><br />“Sound Blocking Products – QUIET BARRIER® LD Composite” . Soundproof Foam. 11 March, 2011<br /> <http://www.soundprooffoam.com/value-barrier.html><br />“Sound Blocking Products – QUIET BARRIER® MD Composite” . Soundproof Foam. 11 March, 2011<br /> <http://www.soundprooffoam.com/dura-barrier.html><br />“Sound Blocking Products – QUIET BARRIER® HD Composite” . Soundproof Foam. 11 March, 2011<br /> <http://www.soundprooffoam.com/ultra-barrier.html><br />
  62. 62. ~ The End ~Thank You !<br />

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