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Slice of life recount

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Slice of Life recount example

Slice of Life recount example

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    • 1. Slice of Life RecountA slice of life story - a "cut-out" sequenceof events in a characters life.Depicts every-day life of ordinary people.
    • 2. Slice of Life Recountbriefcaptures a slice / cut out of an experiencemakes a pointuses the sensestell about the ordinary - a common sharedexperience sunset, baking, walking on a beach,scavenging in a rock pool, a trip to Snowplanet,Rainbow’s End, Huia, a camp experience - sailing forthe first time, the flying fox....... surfing at Piha
    • 3. LanguageActions verbs“The old woman was in his way”becomes“The old woman barred his path”“She laughed” - “She cackled”
    • 4. Active nouns - make the nouns do something i.e.“It was raining” to become “Rain splashed down”“There was a large cabinet” becomes“A large cabinet seemed to fill the lounge”Adjectivesthe catthe valuable catthe old tortoiseshell cat
    • 5. Use of the senses: to describe and develop the experiences, setting and character:•What does it smell like?•What can be heard?•What can be seen - details?•What does it taste like?•What does it feel like?
    • 6. Imagery•Simile: The sea looked as rumpled as a blue quilted dressing gown. Or The wind wrapped me up like a cloak.•Metaphor: eg. She has a heart of stone or He is a stubborn mule or The man barked out the instructions.
    • 7. •Onomatopoeia: eg. crackle, splat, ooze, squish, boom, eg. The tyres whirred on the road. The pitter-patter of soft rain. The mud oozed and squished through my toes.•Personification: eg. The steel beam clenched its muscles. Clouds limped across the sky. The pebbles on the path were grey with grief.
    • 8. Skiing Nicholas Van Nest, Grade 6Icy frost whips against my goggles, the wind, tearing through myclothes. My skis feeling as if they’re on fire as I speed down the hilltoward the stunt ramp. Suddenly I flash back to last year’s vacationwhen I had been in the same boots racing down this very hill. I hadforgotten to lean back, lost both skis from the ramp, and done a flipresulting in a head-plant. Well, that wasn’t going to happen this year, Ithought, as I gripped the ski poles tighter and leaned forward. The windwas screaming in my ears as if even the elements were cheering me on.Tilting backwards I pushed one last time, and let speed decide my fate.On to the ramp I flew, shooting into the air losing all sense of gravity,time, or space, just begging to pull through. SWOOSH! I felt vibrationstingling the bottom of my skis. I’d made it!“I’m alive! Oh-ya!” I screamed. “In all of ya’ll faces. You all disgraces.Pick up the paces.”In the snow, dancing in my skis, I realized a German couple was staringat me wide-eyed, and I heard the husband say:“Iz ziz how all crazy Americans act?”