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ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
ASP.NET Session 3
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ASP.NET Session 3

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  • To use this concept in OOP we derived the idea of Class and Object.
  • Encapsulation: Also termed as Information hiding , is the ability to hide the internals of an object from its users and also to provide an interface to only those members which you want the client to manipulate. Inheritance : Specification of relationship of one class with another class. A derived class is the new class being created and the base class is the one from which it is derived . Polymorphism : Its is the functionality that allows old code to call new code. Allows you to extend or enhance your system without having to modify old code.
  • Transcript

    • 1. C# language Session -3
    • 2. Objectives 1.Understanding of the language basics to facilitate development. 2.Basic Object Oriented Programming concepts and C# Programming Structure. 3. Language fundamentals 4.Doing our first C# Program. 5. Hands on knowledge in Visual Studio.
    • 3. Introduction • C# (pronounced “See Sharp”) is a simple, modern, object-oriented programming language. • It was made by Microsoft Corporation, more precisely by Anders Hejlsberg. • It was created to use all capacities of .NET platform. The first version appeared in 2001, last update appeared in 2010 with the C# 4.0. • C# has its roots in the C family of languages and will be immediately familiar to C, C++, and Java programmers.
    • 4. Fundamentals of Object Oriented Programming • OOPs design methodology is different from traditional language like BASIC, Pascal, C etc. Those are called the Procedural Language. • In OOP, the emphasis is on Data and not on procedures. Class • In OOP, A class describes all the attributes of objects,as well as the methods that implement the behavior of member object. • A class is only a specification of a data type. • A class is like a blue print of the Object.
    • 5. Fundamentals of Object Oriented Programming(Contd..) Objects • They are instance of classes. • Objects are the central idea behind OOP technology. • An object is a bundle of variables and related methods. • When an object is created memory allocation takes place.
    • 6. Fundamentals of Object Oriented Programming(Contd..) Three principles of object oriented programming 1.Encapsulation • The ability to hide the internals details of an object from the outside world. 2.Inheritance • Hierarchy is used to define more specialized classes based on a preexisting generalized class. 3.Polymorphism • The ability to extend functionality.
    • 7. Abstract Class:  We can not create a object of abstract class.  It only allows other classes to inherit from it but can't be instantiated.  In C# we use Abstract Keyword. Interface  An interface is not a class, is entity.  An interface has no implementation; it only has the signature.  Just the definition of the methods without the body.
    • 8. Partial Class Example • public partial class MyClass • { • partial void DoSomethingElse(); • public void DoSomething() • { Console.WriteLine("DoSomething() execution started."); • DoSomethingElse(); • Console.WriteLine("DoSomething() execution finished.");
    • 9. • Console.ReadKey(); • } • } • public partial class MyClass • { • partial void DoSomethingElse() • { • Console.WriteLine("DoSomethingElse() called."); • } • }
    • 10. • class Program • { • • static void Main(string[] args) • { • MyClass mm = new MyClass(); • mm.DoSomething(); • } • } • }
    • 11. OutPut • DoSomething() execution started. • DoSomethingElse() called. • DoSomething() execution finished.
    • 12. C# Language Fundamentals • Garbage collection automatically reclaims memory occupied by unused objects. • Exception handling provides a structured and extensible approach to error detection and recovery. • Ex: try, catch & finally • C# is case-sensitive.
    • 13. C# Console Application • Console applications in C# have exactly the same purpose as regular console applications: to provide a command line interface with the user. • Console applications have three main input streams: standard in, standard out and standard error. • “Hello World” Program using C#: using System; class Hello { static void Main(String[] args) { Console.WriteLine("Hello, World"); } }
    • 14. C# Console Application in Visual Studio
    • 15. C# Console Application(Contd..) • The "System.Console" class:- The main element in a console application is the "System.Console" class. It contains all methods needed to control the three streams of data. • "ReadLine" method:- The main ways of acquiring data from the standard input stream. "ReadLine" reads a whole line of characters from the buffer up to the point where the first end line character ("n") is found. It outputs its data as "string“.
    • 16. Working with Visual Studio • Microsoft Visual Studio is an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) from Microsoft. • It can be used to develop Console applications along with Windows Forms applications, web sites, web applications, and web services. • Features : 1. Code editor 2. Debugger 3. Designer 4. Other Tools
    • 17. Code editor • Visual Studio includes a code editor that supports syntax highlighting and code completion using IntelliSense for not only variables, functions and methods but also language constructs like loops and queries. • Autocomplete suggestions are popped up in a modeless list box, overlaid on top of the code editor.
    • 18. Debugger • Visual Studio includes a debugger that works both as a source-level debugger and as a machine-level debugger. • It works with both managed code as well as native code and can be used for debugging applications written in any language supported by Visual Studio. • The debugger allows setting breakpoints (which allow execution to be stopped temporarily at a certain position). • The debugger supports Edit and Continue, i.e., it allows code to be edited as it is being debugged (32 bit only; not supported in 64 bit). • When debugging, if the mouse pointer hovers over any variable, its current value is displayed in a tooltip ("data tooltips"), where it can also be modified if desired.
    • 19. Designer • Visual Studio includes a host of visual designers to aid in the development of applications. These tools include: 1. Windows Forms Designer 2. Web designer/development 3. Class designer 4. Data designer
    • 20. Windows Forms Designer • The Windows Forms designer is used to build GUI applications using Windows Forms. • It includes a palette of UI widgets and controls (including buttons, progress bars, labels, layout containers and other controls) that can be dragged and dropped on a form surface. • Layout can be controlled by housing the controls inside other containers or locking them to the side of the form. • Controls that display data (like textbox, list box, grid view, etc.) can be data-bound to data sources like databases or queries. • The designer generates either C# or VB.NET code for the application.
    • 21. Web designer/development • Visual Studio also includes a web-site editor and designer that allows web pages to be authored by dragging and dropping Web controls. • It is used for developing ASP.NET applications and supports HTML, CSS and JavaScript. • It uses a code-behind model to link with ASP.NET code.
    • 22. Class designer • The Class Designer is used to author and edit the classes. • The Class Designer can generate C# and VB.NET code outlines for the classes and methods. • It can also generate class diagrams from hand- written classes.
    • 23. Data designer • The data designer can be used to graphically edit typed database tables, primary and foreign keys and constraints. • It can also be used to design queries from the graphical view.
    • 24. Polymorphism in .Net • What is Polymorphism? Polymorphism means same operation may behave differently on different classes. Example of Compile Time Polymorphism: Method Overloading Example of Run Time Polymorphism: Method Overriding
    • 25. Example of Compile Time Polymorphism Method Overloading - Method with same name but with different arguments is called method overloading. - Method Overloading forms compile-time polymorphism. - Example of Method Overloading: class A1 { void hello() { Console.WriteLine(“Hello”); } void hello(string s) { Console.WriteLine(“Hello {0}”,s); } }
    • 26. Run Time Polymorphism • Method Overriding - Method overriding occurs when child class declares a method that has the same type arguments as a method declared by one of its superclass. - Method overriding forms Run-time polymorphism. - Note: By default functions are not virtual in C# and so you need to write “virtual” explicitly. While by default in Java each function are virtual. - Example of Method Overriding:
    • 27. • Class parent { virtual void hello() { Console.WriteLine(“Hello from Parent”); } } Class child : parent { override void hello() { Console.WriteLine(“Hello from Child”); } } static void main() { parent objParent = new child(); objParent.hello(); } //Output Hello from Child. •
    • 28. Summery Language basics to facilitate development. Basic Object Oriented Programming concepts C# Programming Structure. Language fundamentals Doing our first C# Program. Hands on knowledge in Visual Studio.

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