Mikkeli20.9.2012

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  • 1. 19.9.2012 1Sirpa Kurppa,MTT Agrifood Research FinlandSustainable BioeconomyFUTURE CHALLENGES IN PROFESSIONAL KITCHENS IIIInternational Seminar 19. – 20.9.2012, Mikkeli, Finland
  • 2. 19.9.2012 2What does sustainable bioeconomymean?• ‘The term "Bioeconomy" means an economy using biologicalresources from the land and sea, as well as waste, as inputs tofood and feed, industrial and energy production. It also covers theuse of bio-based processes for sustainable industries.’Brussels, 13 February 2012 – The European Commission• Strategy for a sustainable bio-economy is to ensure smartgreen growth in Europe.FUTURE CHALLENGES IN PROFESSIONAL KITCHENS IIIInternational Seminar 19. – 20.9.2012, Mikkeli, Finland
  • 3. 19.9.2012 3The bio-economy in the European UnionSector Annual turnover(billion €)Employment(thousands)Data sourceFood 965 4400 CIAAAgriculture 381 12000 COPA-COGECA,EurostatPaper/Pulp 375 1800 CEPIForestry/Wood ind. 269 3000 CEI-BOISFisheries andAquaculture32 500 EC***Bio-based industriesBio-chemicals andplastics50 (estimation*) 150 (estimation*) USDA, Arthur D Little,Festel, McKinsey, CEFICEnzymes 0.8 (estimation*) 5 (estimation*) Amfep, Novozymes,Danisco/Genencor, DSMBiofuels 6** 150 EBB, eBioTotal 2078 22005*Estimation for Europe for 2009; **Estimation based on a production of 2.2 million tonnes bio-ethanol and7.7 million tonnes of biodiesel at average market price in Europe; ***EC, Facts and figures on the CFP,Basic Statistics Data, ISSN 1830-9119, 2010 Edition
  • 4. The Strategy has three main pillars:1) Investment in research, innovation and skills for the bio-economy.This should include EU funding, national funding, private investment andenhancing synergies with other policy initiatives.2) Development of markets and competitiveness in bio-economysectors by a sustainable intensification of primary production,conversion of waste streams into value-added products, as well asmutual learning mechanisms for improved production and resourceefficiency. As an example, food waste costs the European taxpayerbetween €55 and €90 per tonne to dispose of, and produces 170 milliontonnes of CO2. This waste could be transformed into bio-energy orother bio-based products, creating jobs and growth.3) Reinforced policy coordination and stakeholder engagement,through the creation of a Bioeconomy Panel, a Bioeconomy Observatoryand regular Stakeholder Conferences;19.9.2012 4FUTURE CHALLENGES IN PROFESSIONAL KITCHENS IIIInternational Seminar 19. – 20.9.2012, Mikkeli, Finland
  • 5. Research and innovation in the bio-economy – examples• 1) FORBIOPLAST - Drawing on forest resources for sustainablemanufacturing - to reduce its dependence on petro-chemicals. - wood-derived fibres and forestry by-products could replace petro-chemicals in awide array of products• 2) AQUAMAX (FP7) – creating a vegetarian diet for fish -alternative for fishmeal and fish oil• 3) Future biodegradable materials for a better quality of life (ERC)- eco-friendly plastic bags - creating of materials that mimic nature’s structuralorganization - biodegrade• 4) Paving the way to greener products and services (JRC). Life cycleassessment is a key to substantial improvement of the environmentalperformance of goods and services - it quantifies the impacts of productsfrom the extraction of natural resources to recycling or waste disposal.19.9.2012 5
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  • 7. Unit process thinking19.9.2012 7
  • 8. 19.9.2012 8Douple functional processes etc soya, rape seed, cow…
  • 9. From gradle to grave19.9.2012 9Be careful with the system boundaries with complex systems as bioe-conomyconsists and of which organic production is a special case!
  • 10. Land useInput industryFeed productionFeed industryMilk farmDairy factoryTradeConsumersEnergyToxic wasteSolid wasteLiquid wasteand nutrientsLandscapeStakeholdersadministrativeLocal peoplePublic mediaNGOsZitizensProduct ownersTransportHow ecological footprint is being formed.Graph: Pasi VoutilainenWaterSurface water19.9.201210
  • 11. 19.9.2012 11
  • 12. 19.9.2012 12LCA approach isalways goal oriented!It is good forimprovment!It is very challenging inuse to compare twodifferent systems
  • 13. 19.9.2012 13What does sustainable bioeconomymean?• ‘The term "Bioeconomy" means an economy using biologicalresources from the land and sea, as well as waste, as inputs tofood and feed, industrial and energy production. It also covers theuse of bio-based processes for sustainable industries.’Brussels, 13 February 2012 – The European Commission• Strategy for a sustainable bio-economy is to ensure smartgreen growth in Europe.FUTURE CHALLENGES IN PROFESSIONAL KITCHENS IIIInternational Seminar 19. – 20.9.2012, Mikkeli, Finland
  • 14. smart green growth• High-tech knowledge of unit processes• Novel combination of unit processes into sub-systems• Complex and case specific systems• Co-creation• Service oriented - prosumerism• Online assessment, which is goal and value oriented• Facilitated by• cloud technology19.9.2012 14http://cloud-computation.blogspot.fi/search/label/Cloud%20Computing
  • 15. The Strategy has three main pillars:1) Investment in research, innovation and skills for the bio-economy.This should include EU funding, national funding, private investment andenhancing synergies with other policy initiatives.2) Development of markets and competitiveness in bio-economysectors by a sustainable intensification of primary production,conversion of waste streams into value-added products, as well asmutual learning mechanisms for improved production and resourceefficiency. As an example, food waste costs the European taxpayerbetween €55 and €90 per tonne to dispose of, and produces 170 milliontonnes of CO2. This waste could be transformed into bio-energy orother bio-based products, creating jobs and growth.3) Reinforced policy coordination and stakeholder engagement,through the creation of a Bioeconomy Panel, a Bioeconomy Observatoryand regular Stakeholder Conferences;19.9.2012 15FUTURE CHALLENGES IN PROFESSIONAL KITCHENS IIIInternational Seminar 19. – 20.9.2012, Mikkeli, Finland
  • 16. New markets can be developed by:• Developing standards and standardised sustainabilityassessment methodologies for bio-based products andfood production systems and supporting demonstration andscale-up activities;• Facilitating green procurement for bio-based products bydeveloping specific labels, an initial European productinformation list and specific training for public procurers;• Putting in place incentives and mutual learningmechanisms for improved resource efficiency;• Starting negotiations for establishing research and innovationPublic Private Partnerships for bio-based industries atEuropean level.19.9.2012 16FUTURE CHALLENGES IN PROFESSIONAL KITCHENS IIIInternational Seminar 19. – 20.9.2012, Mikkeli, Finland
  • 17. The Strategy has three main pillars:1) Investment in research, innovation and skills for the bio-economy.This should include EU funding, national funding, private investment andenhancing synergies with other policy initiatives.2) Development of markets and competitiveness in bio-economysectors by a sustainable intensification of primary production,conversion of waste streams into value-added products, as well asmutual learning mechanisms for improved production and resourceefficiency. As an example, food waste costs the European taxpayerbetween €55 and €90 per tonne to dispose of, and produces 170 milliontonnes of CO2. This waste could be transformed into bio-energy orother bio-based products, creating jobs and growth.3) Reinforced policy coordination and stakeholder engagement,through the creation of a Bioeconomy Panel, a Bioeconomy Observatoryand regular Stakeholder Conferences;19.9.2012 17FUTURE CHALLENGES IN PROFESSIONAL KITCHENS IIIInternational Seminar 19. – 20.9.2012, Mikkeli, Finland
  • 18. Steps to achieve greater coherenceinclude:• Creating a Bioeconomy Panel built on already existing resources andstructures, that will involve relevant European Commission services,Member States and stakeholders to ensure synergies and coherencebetween policies, initiatives and economic sectors. Encourage the creationof similar panels at Member State and regional level.• A Bioeconomy Observatory at EU level will be established to assess theprogress and impact of the bio-economy in Europe and to inform furtherpolicy making. The Observatory will build on existing systems at regional,national and supra-national level and develop common indicators formeasuring bio-economy activity.• Support the development of regional and national bio-economy strategiesby providing a mapping of existing research and innovation activities,competence centres and infrastructures in the EU (by 2015).• Foster participation of researchers, end-users, policy-makers and civilsociety in an open and informed dialogue throughout the research andinnovation process of the bio-economy.19.9.2012 18FUTURE CHALLENGES IN PROFESSIONAL KITCHENS IIIInternational Seminar 19. – 20.9.2012, Mikkeli, Finland
  • 19. 19.9.2012 19
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  • 21. 19.9.2012 21Compare to local food!
  • 22. In Finland: Potential Challenges andBenefits of Bioeconomy• Lack of standardization• Inward-oriented business models• Challenges related to authorities• Solid requirements on materials used• Limitations on usage of biofuel production by-products (feed,fertilization)• Need for country level quotas for biofuels• Tax breaks and other incentives• Life-cycle thinking in decision making• Legislation changes and related uncertainty• Missing permits and regulation e.g. for new types of production in thescope of the bio-economy• Challenges related to knowledge and information flows19.9.2012 22
  • 23. • Related to investments• Benefit and risk sharing• Industry restructuring and core businesses’• Commitment of other actors involved• Education and awareness• Locality and small scale19.9.2012 23In Finland: Potential Challenges andBenefits of Bioeconomy cont.
  • 24. Programme to promote sustainableconsumption and production- More from Less – Wisely, was published in May2012.• For the food sector, the expert group proposes theintroduction of a tracking system, to verify thatresponsible practices are being applied.• This would provide information on the origin of food andits production chain.• Food that is healthy, appetising and environmentallyfriendly can be combined, by developing a ‘Healthy andenvironmentally friendly plate model’.19.9.2012 24
  • 25. Recommendations fornutritionRecommendations forFood choicesWorkwelfare‘Healthy andenvironmentally friendlyplate model’.
  • 26. 19.9.2012260 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100Normalised global warming impacts of a Finn (Eco-Benchmark)Broad bean patty with mashed potatoes (veget.) homeSoy bean patty with mashed potatoes (vegetarian), homeBeetroot patty with barley, homeSoy bean patty with mashed potatoes (ovo-lactoveget.) homeVegetable casserole, homeMinced meat-macaroni casserole, ready-to-eatRainbow trout casserole, ready-to-eatChicken-pasta casserole, ready-to-eatHam casserole, ready-to-eatVegetable casserole, ready-to-eatBarley porridge with berry fool, ready-to-eatMinced chicken meat-macaroni casserole, homeFrankfurter and mashed potatoes, homeBarley porridge with berry fool, homeRainbow trout casserole, homeChicken sauce with wholemeal pasta, homeChicken sauce with wholemeal rice, homeChicken casserole, homeChicken in cream sauce with rice, ready-to-eatHam casserole, homeMinced meat-macaroni casserole, homeGlobal warming impact of the case lunch plates in relation tonormalised daily global warming impact of an average Finn27, 4 kgCO2 ekv+I kgI kg I kg+%Climate change impact per a food portion
  • 27. 19.9.2012 270 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100Normalised eutrification impacts of a Finn (Eco-Benchmark)Soy bean patty with mashed potatoes (vegetarian) homeBroad bean patty with mashed potatoes, homeBeetroot patty with barley, homeChicken-pasta casserole, ready-to-eatVegetable casserole, homeSoy bean patty with mashed potatoes (ovo-lactoveget.) homeVegetable casserole, ready-to-eatMinced meat-macaroni casserole, ready-to-eatMinced chicken meat-macaroni casserole, homeHam casserole, ready-to-eatFrankfurter and mashed potatoes, homeBarley porridge with berry fool, ready-to-eatChicken sauce with wholemeal pasta, homeChicken in cream sauce with rice, ready-to-eatChicken sauce with wholemeal rice, homeChicken casserole, homeBarley porridge with berry fool, homeHam casserole, homeRainbow trout casserole, ready-to-eatMinced meat-macaroni casserole , homeRainbow trout casserole, homeEutrophication impact of the case lunch plates in relation to normalised dailyeutrophication impact of an average Finn%The lunch plates comprised a main dish, salad, bread and a drink9,6 gPO4ekvI gI g I g+ +Eutrophication impact per a food portion,specific for Nordic conditions and in terms of th Baltic Sea
  • 28. 19.9.2012 28Sincere thanks for your interest!