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Best Buy Ethics Case

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Human Resource Management 10/2010

Human Resource Management 10/2010

Published in: Education, Technology, Business

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  • When all your employees act ethically, it benefits everyone. Your employees will be happy, stockholders will be happy, the community will be happy, every stakeholder will benefit the rewards of your company following ethical guidelines. ” We are not saying that by teaching ethics, your company will be perfect, that no one will steal, or that your profitability will double by hiring an ethics officer. But what we are saying is that by implementing ethics into corporate policy, you can make a manager for example stop and ask him/herself. “Does this decision fall within the accepted values or standards of Best Buy policy?” Kathleen Edmund has a blog where she writes about incidents she has encountered as the Chief Ethics Officer at Best Buy of employees acting unethically and people can join in the conversation and say what they want. She recently posted an incident where one employee used gift card to launder company theft. The manager acting unethically here, bought $100,000 + best buy gift cards to supposedly give to his/her employees for job well done at the company’s expense but would not only by them but would sign off on a subordinates to purchase them too. When the subordinate found out something fishy was going on, he/she confronted the manager and did not report the manager but because his active partner. Teaching ethics is not an easy thing to do. There is no RIGHT way to do it, but it is valuable for your employees to learn. It is important too that senior execs, management, and HR act as a role models to lower-level employees. They should always try to act ethically and also remind their employees about the consequences of not acting ethically and also do implement your rewards systems, like our former Best Buy employee, Clinton, said earlier that he never saw their rewards system put to use.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Can you teach people to be ethical?
      MarielaMacklis
      Clinton Jones
      Kayla Zacher
      Ledia Soriano
      Roman Feygenberg
    • 2. Introduction
      Ethics Training
      Kathleen Edmond (Chief Ethics Officer)
      140,000 U.S. & Canadian employees each year
      Trainer delivered
      1/5th of performance review
      Rewards
      Skills required? Does it work? Can it be better?
      eth·i·cal [eth-i-kuhl]
      -adjective
      pertaining to or dealing with morals or the principles of morality; pertaining to right &wrong in conduct.
      2
    • 3. Being Ethical:
      Skills &Abilities
      Know the laws
      -rules and regulations of the company
      Training
      Team work skills
      Ability to communicate well
      3
    • 4. “Ethical Plan”
      • Enforce Code of Conduct
      • 5. Give scenarios
      • 6. Focus on real workplace issues
      • 7. Learn to observe/react quickly
      • 8. Talk about consequences
      • 9. Good performance reviews lead to rewards
      4
    • 10. Online Ethics Courses
      5
    • 11. Does it work?
      • You can’t MAKE someone ethical
      • 12. Motivators can cloud judgment
      • 13. Ethics is about “living it even when no one is watching”
      • 14. Common sense
      • 15. Everyone is different
      • 16. Morals, beliefs, motivations, etc.
      • 17. Foundation of becoming a good employee/person
      6
    • 18. Suggestions
      • Personal experience
      • 19. Current rewards system
      • 20. Use simulation training
      • 21. Group-building methods & team training
      • 22. Create & maintain an ethical work culture
      7
    • 23. Conclusion
      The importance of ethics in business
      Kathleen Edmond’s ethics blog
      Senior execs, management & HR act as role models
      Follow up on rewards systems
      “Morals are an acquirement – like music, like a foreign language, like piety, poker, paralysis –no man is born with them.”
      -Mark Twain
      8
    • 24. “It is not what leaders SAY that matters but
      what they DO.”
      9
    • 25. Questions?
      10