Transmedia Storytelling

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This was developed for the Telefilm/NFB Melting Silos workshop (Nov.6 2009) and the What's Going On Salons series (Nov.7 2009), both Vancouver

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Transmedia Storytelling

  1. 1. TRANSMEDIA STORYTELLING Siobhan O’Flynn narrativenow.blogspot.com November 2009
  2. 2. DIGITAL STORIES TODAY... TRANSMEDIA CONVERGENT PARTICIPATORY INTERACTIVE
  3. 3. what’s convergent??? DIGITAL TRADITIONAL MEDIA NARRATIVES
  4. 4. three ways of thinking about today’s online ‘stories’ & storytelling
  5. 5. FORM 1 STORIES GAMES
  6. 6. FORM 1
  7. 7. FORM 1 CHARACTERISTICS?
  8. 8. FORM 1 CHARACTERISTICS? STRUCTURE SPATIAL CLOSURE OPEN PLOT EMERGENT REVEALS STORY PLAY = STORY
  9. 9. FORM 2 EXTENDED INTERACTIVE NARRATIVES NARRATIVES
  10. 10. FORM 2 DISTRIBUTED INTERACTION CUT SCENES CHANGES FIXED STORY
  11. 11. INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  12. 12. World without Oil • ARG • Serious Game • ‘What if’ scenario? • How would your life change without oil? • world without oil March-June 2007
  13. 13. the landscape has changed....
  14. 14. Jordan Weisman 42 Entertainment
  15. 15. Jordan Weisman 42 Entertainment • creator of A.I. ARG, I Love Bees, Why so Serious? • "If we could make your toaster print something we would.”
  16. 16. 42 Entertainment
  17. 17. 42 Entertainment • “Anything with an electric current running through it. • A single story, a single gaming experience, with no boundaries. • A game that is life itself."
  18. 18. MAMET
  19. 19. FORMS 1& 2 STORY CONTROL CHOICE
  20. 20. BOTH ARE PARTICIPATORY EXPLORATORY FOSTER UGC SOCIAL
  21. 21. 4 PROPERTIES OF DIGITAL ENVIRONMENTS • PROCEDURAL - RULE BASED • PARTICIPATORY - INVITATION TO ACT • SPATIAL - WORLD, PHYSICS, NETWORK • ENCYCLOPEDIC - eg. THE SIMS
  22. 22. WHAT DO STORIES DO?
  23. 23. 2 VIEWS
  24. 24. • “Database and narrative are natural enemies.” • Lev Manovich (2001) • http://vv.arts.ucla.edu/AI_Society/manovich.html
  25. 25. DAVID MAMET 3 USES OF A KNIFE • ‘Our survival mechanism orders the world into cause-effect-conclusion.’ • art & drama = ‘the human capacity to order the intolerable into meaning’
  26. 26. STORIES/storytelling are innate and function as the cognitive tool for organizing the world into a coherent, meaningful experience.
  27. 27. • Any meaningful negotiation of a database (vs. random) is potentially a story • either of what is found • or of the experience of finding • Digital environments are story-spaces waiting to happen • waiting for structure / design
  28. 28. FORM 3
  29. 29. FORM 3 LINEAR NON-LINEAR story fragments plot connections progression exploration
  30. 30. FORM 3
  31. 31. SWITCHING MORTEN SCHøDT 2003
  32. 32. INTERACTIVITY CONTROL CHOICE
  33. 33. INTERACTIVITY DESIGNER USER CREATOR GAMER AUTHOR PARTICIPANT
  34. 34. INTENTION GOAL ORIENTED EXPLORATORY
  35. 35. INTENTION GOAL ORIENTED: EXPLORATORY: PUZZLES PLAY QUESTS SPATIAL GAMES EMERGENT TASKS ENCYCLOPEDIC
  36. 36. PARTICIPANT IS CO-CREATOR
  37. 37. DIGITAL MEDIA = RULES
  38. 38. DIGITAL MEDIA = RULES
  39. 39. DIGITAL MEDIA = RULES STORIES = GAMES = • GENRES • PLOT • GENRES • WORLD • GOALS • INTERACTIVITY
  40. 40. STORIES LINEAR/ EMERGENT NON-LINEAR CONTROLLED ACTIVE SCRIPTED ENGAGEMENT
  41. 41. STORIES CAUSE & EFFECT LINKING THROUGH = PLOT ASSOCIATIONS
  42. 42. STORIES DYNAMIC RELATIONS
  43. 43. STORIES CONTROLLED DYNAMIC STORY THREADS RELATIONS
  44. 44. STORIES STORY STORY CONTAINED CREATED IN BY DESIGN PARTICIPANT
  45. 45. IF INTERACTIVITY ≠ PLOT, HOW TO CREATE NARRATIVE COHERENCE? = STORY = IMMERSION = SATISFACTION
  46. 46. ROOTS OF NARRATIVE
  47. 47. ROOTS OF NARRATIVE • EPIC: Gilgamesh, Homer • ARISTOTLE • ARCHETYPES: Myths; folk tales, fairy tales • GENRES = PLOT FORMS
  48. 48. THE EPIC
  49. 49. THE EPIC • HOW DO YOU CONTROL A NARRATIVE OVER MULTIPLE DAYS TELLING? • poet’s ‘word hoard’ • patterns, set pieces, echoes, allusions, short hand notation • spatial design
  50. 50. HBO IMAGINE
  51. 51. POETICS LITERATURE • THEMES • PATTERNS • IMAGES • DOUBLES • INVERSIONS • TONE
  52. 52. POETICS FILM • MISE EN SCENE • LIGHTING • PACING/EDITING • POINT OF VIEW • DEEP STRUCTURE (MCKEE)
  53. 53. POETICS DIGITAL MEDIA • INTERFACE DESIGN (click vs. zoom....) • TACTILITY • AESTHETIC (cell phone, webcam, vs. HD) • FUNCTIONALITY (ease vs. resistance)
  54. 54. hi-res.net
  55. 55. bigspaceship.com
  56. 56. Tip #1 USE WHAT YOUR AUDIENCE ALREADY KNOWS
  57. 57. ARISTOTLE
  58. 58. ARISTOTLE • FUNDAMENTALS OF GOOD DRAMA: • PLOT • CHARACTER • SETTING • UNITY OF TIME & PLACE • 3 ACT STRUCTURE - rising/falling action
  59. 59. GENRE = CONTRACT
  60. 60. PLOT = CONTRACT
  61. 61. DESIGN = NARRATIVE
  62. 62. PLOT • HOW YOU TELL (delivery & genre): • linear & non-linear plots • in medias res • causally connected i.e.: • all events connected through cause and effect • DISCOVERY & REVERSAL - SWITCHING
  63. 63. SCOTT MCCLOUD
  64. 64. ‘BLOOD IN THE GUTTER’ = IMMERSION
  65. 65. LESS IS MORE
  66. 66. IMMERSION = SATISFACTION
  67. 67. IMMERSION = SATISFACTION • ACTIVE CREATION OF STORY • COGNITIVE ENGAGEMENT OF AUDIENCE • ‘WE - THINK’ / COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE PHENOMENON
  68. 68. story & plot = USER experience IN FILM: 1Premise - ‘idea that inspires the story’ the ‘what if?’ factor 2v.s. Controlling idea: ‘the story’s ultimate meaning expressed through action & aesthetic emotion of the last act’s climax’ (McKee)
  69. 69. in digital media core of story = experience • The controlling idea = the experience • The centralbe the centralexpressed through the plot should also experience experience that defines the interactive experience • ‘Pirates all the way down...’
  70. 70. ASYLUM 626
  71. 71. OUR CHOICES SHOULD BE MEANINGFUL & DRIVE THE STORY / OUR EXPERIENCE
  72. 72. AUDIENCE & MCKEE’S PLOTS • Archplot: Chinatown, Matrix, Star Wars... • Miniplot: Blow Up, Short Cuts, • Antiplot: Wayne’s World, Gerry • BE AWARE OF YOUR STORY DESIGN
  73. 73. REVERSAL & DISCOVERY • the most powerful elements of emotional interest in Tragedy are Reversal and Discovery as these elements change our understanding of the story(s)
  74. 74. FORM 3
  75. 75. NON-LINEAR PLOTS USE • JUXTAPOSITION: • MEANWHILE / FLASHBACKS • REVERSALS & DISCOVERIES THAT CHANGE WHAT WE KNOW • RECONFIGURE AS NEW STORY
  76. 76. • ‘Of course my films have beginnings, middles, and ends, just not necessarily in that order.’ • Godard
  77. 77. CHARACTER • DEFINED BY ACTIONS (GAMES) • OUR CHOICES DEFINE WHO WE ARE, NOT OUR THOUGHTS & OPINIONS • CHARACTER IS THEN A FUNCTION OF THE PLOT • POV - AVATAR, FIRST-PERSON
  78. 78. CHARACTER SIMPLE VS. COMPLEX
  79. 79. Samsung's interactive video Follow Your Instinct
  80. 80. DAVID LYNCH Interview Project
  81. 81. SETTING • SETTING - contemporary focus on ‘story world’ (Tali Krakowsky, Alex McDowell) • Henry Jenkins - Game design as narrative architecture • spatial narratives are exploratory by nature • setting can mirror, contrast, foreshadow actions & themes
  82. 82. Architecture = Narrative • spatial/architectural design creates and defines opportunities for narrative direction. • i.e. what is available in the space, the specifics of place already encode expectations as to the types of action we will encounter • strip club vs. Court of King Arthur • hospital vs. Star Trek but...Battlestar Gallactica?
  83. 83. TINMAN (verizon)
  84. 84. SPATIAL NARRATIVES
  85. 85. SPATIAL NARRATIVES • RELY ON: • ASSOCIATIONS • PATTERNS • MIRRORING & INVERSIONS
  86. 86. Errol Morris Standard Operating Procedure
  87. 87. SPATIAL ORGANIZATION
  88. 88. SPATIAL ORGANIZATION • PHYSICAL STRUCTURES • WORLD CREATION • TIME LINE • MAPS • CHARACTER LISTS
  89. 89. OAKLAND CRIMESPOTTING INTERACTIVE CRIME MAP
  90. 90. WHALE HUNT Jonathan Harris
  91. 91. • there is sooo much more....explore... • Part 2, 3, 4.... coming • Siobhan O’Flynn • links archive at: www.narrativenow.blogspot.com

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