Dr. Mark Simpson aka Dr. S September 5, 2008
<ul><li>Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Web 1.0 Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Final Exam!! </li></ul>
<ul><li>By the end of this presentation, you should be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Locate & briefly describe specific Web t...
<ul><li>Web 1.0 = one-way road; self-publishing (e.g., putting info on your website); downloading an application to create...
<ul><li>Photo Story 3: “ Create slideshows using your  digital photos .  </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Movie Maker: “ Windows ...
<ul><li>Video Tutorial </li></ul><ul><li>A sample Photo Story by an FGCU instructor </li></ul><ul><li>Sample photo stories...
<ul><li>How to make a WMM - Video </li></ul><ul><li>Additional Resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Our electronic file  (emai...
<ul><li>How to make an Animoto video clip </li></ul><ul><li>An FGCU instructor-produced Animoto video clip </li></ul><ul><...
<ul><ul><li>How might you use these in your courses?  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How might your students use them in your ...
<ul><li>Blog:  a web log with commentary from readers </li></ul><ul><li>Wiki:  collected web pages which users can contrib...
<ul><li>Blogs in Plain English </li></ul><ul><li>A sample FGCU instructor’s blog </li></ul><ul><li>A sample FGCU student’s...
<ul><li>Wikis in Plain English </li></ul><ul><li>Educators on Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>A Quicki Wiki Lesson </li></ul><ul><...
<ul><li>What’s a Voicethread anyway? </li></ul><ul><li>An FGCU instructor-produced Voicethread </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Vo...
<ul><li>Google Docs in Plain English </li></ul><ul><li>Google Docs for educators </li></ul><ul><li>Other resources: </li><...
<ul><li>Creating a Voki </li></ul><ul><li>Vokis created by FGCU instructors </li></ul><ul><li>Vokis created by FGCU studen...
<ul><li>Toondoo </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Toondoos by FGCU instructors </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Toondoos by FGCU students <...
<ul><ul><li>How might you use these in your courses?  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How might your students use them in your ...
<ul><li>Where do you find all of these tools? </li></ul><ul><li>Pair work: blog, wiki, Photo Story 3, WMM, Animoto, Voicet...
 
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09 05 08 Optional Attendance Tech Presentation To Fall 2008 Classes

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  • .
  • For the purposes of this presentation, Web 1.0 = A general reference to the World Wide Web during its first few years of operation. The term is mostly used to contrast the earlier days of the Web before blogs, wikis, social networking sites and Web-based applications became commonplace. Web 1.0 refers to the state of the World Wide Web before the Web 2.0 craze, and included most websites in the period between 1994 and 2004 . It is important to note that &amp;quot;Web 1.0&amp;quot; is a retronym . That is to say that it has been retroactively named only after the introduction of the term &amp;quot;Web 2.0&amp;quot;, and has very loosely defined boundaries. For the most part websites were a strictly one-way published media, similar to the Gopher protocol that came before it. Web 2.0 = Web 2.0 is a term describing the trend in the use of World Wide Web technology and web design that aims to enhance creativity , information sharing, and, most notably, collaboration among users. These concepts have led to the development and evolution of web-based communities and hosted services , such as social-networking sites , wikis , blogs , and folksonomies . The term became notable after the first O&apos;Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in 2004 . [2] [3] Although the term suggests a new version of the World Wide Web , it does not refer to an update to any technical specifications, but to changes in the ways software developers and end-users use the Web. Summary of Differences = At the Technet Summit in November 2006 , Reed Hastings , founder and CEO of Netflix , stated a simple formula for defining the phases of the Web: “ Web 1.0 was dial-up, 50K average bandwidth, Web 2.0 is an average 1 megabit of bandwidth and Web 3.0 will be 10 megabits of bandwidth all the time, which will be the full video Web, and that will feel like Web 3.0
  • Photo Story 3: “ Create slideshows using your digital photos . With a single click, you can touch-up, crop, or rotate pictures. Add stunning special effects, soundtracks, and your own voice narration to your photo stories. Then, personalize them with titles and captions. Small file sizes make it easy to send your photo stories in an e-mail. Watch them on your TV, a computer, or a Windows Mobile–based portable device. Windows Movie Maker: “ Windows Movie Maker 2.1 makes home movies amazingly fun…you can create, edit, and share your home movies right on your computer. Build your movie with a few simple drag-and-drops. Delete bad shots and include only the best scenes. Then share your movie via the Web, e-mail, or CD. Using third-party software you can even take movies you&apos;ve made and turn them into DVDs . You can also save your movie back to the video tape in your camera to play back on a TV or on the camera itself.
  • A blog (an abridgment of the term web log ) is a website , usually maintained by an individual, with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video. Entries are commonly displayed in reverse chronological order. &amp;quot;Blog&amp;quot; can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog. Many blogs provide commentary or news on a particular subject; others function as more personal online diaries . A typical blog combines text, images, and links to other blogs, web pages , and other media related to its topic. The ability for readers to leave comments in an interactive format is an important part of many blogs. A wiki is a collection of web pages designed to enable anyone who accesses it to contribute or modify content, using a simplified markup language [1] [2] . Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites and to power community websites. A VoiceThread is an online media album that can hold essentially any type of media (images, documents and videos) and allows people to make comments in 5 different ways - using voice (with a microphone or telephone), text, audio file, or video (with a webcam) - and share them with anyone they wish. They can even be exported to an Archival Movie for offline use on a DVD or video-enabled MP3 player. A VoiceThread allows group conversations to be collected and shared in one place, from anywhere in the world. Writeboards are sharable, web-based text documents that let you save every edit, roll back to any version, and easily compare changes. Use Writeboard to write solo or collaborate with others.
  • 09 05 08 Optional Attendance Tech Presentation To Fall 2008 Classes

    1. 1. Dr. Mark Simpson aka Dr. S September 5, 2008
    2. 2. <ul><li>Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Web 1.0 Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Final Exam!! </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>By the end of this presentation, you should be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Locate & briefly describe specific Web tools which you might use in your courses with Dr. S </li></ul><ul><li>Identify ways in which you might use these tools in these courses </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Web 1.0 = one-way road; self-publishing (e.g., putting info on your website); downloading an application to create something to disseminate information (Photostory, Windows Movie Maker) </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 = two-way highway; interactivity; working online to create something to involve input from others (blogs; wikis; social networking sites - MySpace, FaceBook; web-based applications) </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Photo Story 3: “ Create slideshows using your digital photos . </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Movie Maker: “ Windows Movie Maker 2.1 makes home movies amazingly fun…you can create, edit, and share your home movies right on your computer. </li></ul><ul><li>Animoto: Create a short 30-second video with your photos . The web program uses ‘cinematic artificial intelligence’ to create your video. </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Video Tutorial </li></ul><ul><li>A sample Photo Story by an FGCU instructor </li></ul><ul><li>Sample photo stories </li></ul><ul><li>Other resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Our electronic file </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jakes on line </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MLPSI Video Tutorial </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>How to make a WMM - Video </li></ul><ul><li>Additional Resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Our electronic file (emailed to you if you signed up) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows Movie Maker 2 Creativity Fun Pack </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows Movie Maker 2 Winter Fun Pack </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>How to make an Animoto video clip </li></ul><ul><li>An FGCU instructor-produced Animoto video clip </li></ul><ul><li>Additional Resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Animoto for Education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some uses for Animoto </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><ul><li>How might you use these in your courses? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How might your students use them in your courses? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are some strengths/weaknesses? </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>Blog: a web log with commentary from readers </li></ul><ul><li>Wiki: collected web pages which users can contribute to or modify </li></ul><ul><li>Voicethread: an online media album which users comment on/interact with </li></ul><ul><li>Google Docs: web-based text documents which users can collaborate on </li></ul><ul><li>Voki: represent yourself as an avatar </li></ul><ul><li>Toondoo: create cartoons and export them </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>Blogs in Plain English </li></ul><ul><li>A sample FGCU instructor’s blog </li></ul><ul><li>A sample FGCU student’s blog </li></ul><ul><li>Blog resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>blogger </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Angel </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>Wikis in Plain English </li></ul><ul><li>Educators on Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>A Quicki Wiki Lesson </li></ul><ul><li>pbwiki for university educators </li></ul><ul><li>Other resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Angel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wetpaint Wikis in Plain English </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eduwikis </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>What’s a Voicethread anyway? </li></ul><ul><li>An FGCU instructor-produced Voicethread </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Voicethreads used in teaching writing </li></ul><ul><li>Other resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Voicethread (a YouTube tutorial) </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Google Docs in Plain English </li></ul><ul><li>Google Docs for educators </li></ul><ul><li>Other resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How to Use Google Docs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Five Things You Probably Didn’t Know You Could Do in Google Docs & Spreadsheets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ten Ways to Use the New Google Docs Productively </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Creating a Voki </li></ul><ul><li>Vokis created by FGCU instructors </li></ul><ul><li>Vokis created by FGCU students </li></ul><ul><li>Other resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Using Vokis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MLPSI Voki Tutorial </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>Toondoo </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Toondoos by FGCU instructors </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Toondoos by FGCU students </li></ul><ul><li>Other resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Using the Toondoo website </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><ul><li>How might you use these in your courses? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How might your students use them in your courses? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are some strengths/weaknesses? </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. <ul><li>Where do you find all of these tools? </li></ul><ul><li>Pair work: blog, wiki, Photo Story 3, WMM, Animoto, Voicethread, Voki, Google Docs, Toondoo </li></ul><ul><li>How might you use them in an academic setting? </li></ul><ul><li>How might your students use them in an academic setting in which writing is a focus? </li></ul>

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