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Branding Strategies for Sales Leaders that Drive Revenue
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Branding Strategies for Sales Leaders that Drive Revenue

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  • A few words about Simon Grew up in Switzerland, German Part University of Bern – Business and Marketing Training and management development 1997 came to the US – San Diego Coaching and leadership development firm – Stand Out international Helping successful people - managers, professionals and leaders - build a stand out brand and make positive lasting changes in their behavior
  • July 16, 2009 by Simon Vetter CALLAWAY GOLF - Sales Conference
  • July 16, 2009 by Simon Vetter CALLAWAY GOLF - Sales Conference
  • Definitions of Marketing Scenario Direct Marketing Tele Marketing Advertisement Brand Recognition
  • Scot – Sales Distribution Team – medical device products Doctors and surgeons – communicated direct, to the point, build strong relationships Always learns, open, product updates, reads books, etc. Marshall Goldsmith: open-minded, ask relevant and challenging questions.
  • Credibility: Believable comes from Integrity Do what I say, say what I do I judge myself based on my intentions. I judge other based on their behaviors.
  • Simon Bill Lewis, Michael Osborn CALLAWAY GOLF - Sales Conference July 16, 2009 by Simon Vetter
  • Peter Leutert Frank
  • Peter Leutert Frank
  • Have a plan: Target client Wher edo you get leads from Key sales activities (referrals, networking, phone, internet,
  • Osborn – colleague, high-performer – she knows her numbers Number of leads each month Pipeline management Conversion rates Average sales per client 4 stages 1. Lead 2. Need assessment 3. proposal phase – demonstrate capabilities 4. commitment stage
  • Quote Michael Phelps
  • Leverage your knowledge - Jhonny Grier – spoke about Building a Team and Team Work.
  • July 16, 2009 by Simon Vetter CALLAWAY GOLF - Sales Conference
  • Ask for a meeting Ask for a referral Ask for the business Takes confidence Fear of rejection
  • July 16, 2009 by Simon Vetter CALLAWAY GOLF - Sales Conference
  • 50-50 Rule NFL Strengths and areas for improvement CALLAWAY GOLF - Sales Conference July 16, 2009 by Simon Vetter
  • Two examples: Bad: Jeanette, J&J Good: Peter Leutert, Agilent
  • Two examples: Bad: Jeanette, J&J Good: Peter Leutert, Agilent
  • July 16, 2009 by Simon Vetter CALLAWAY GOLF - Sales Conference
  • July 16, 2009 by Simon Vetter CALLAWAY GOLF - Sales Conference
  • Two examples: Bad: Jeanette, J&J Good: Peter Leutert, Agilent
  • July 16, 2009 by Simon Vetter CALLAWAY GOLF - Sales Conference
  • Two examples: Bad: Jeanette, J&J Good: Peter Leutert, Agilent
  • Two examples: Bad: Jeanette, J&J Good: Peter Leutert, Agilent
  • Example: RELIABLE Practice what we preach, do what we say, honor our words Starbucks McDonalds Toyota
  • Transcript

    • 1. Sales Leadership Alliance Branding Strategies for Sales Leader that Drive Revenue August 21, 2012
    • 2. Goals for Today1. Understand effective practices for sales performance2. Learn a simple tool to bring out the best in ourselves and others3. Apply a behavioral coaching process to increase sales Page 2
    • 3. Agenda for Today1. Build a Brand as a Sales Leader2. Common Challenge3. The 5 practices of high-performance sales4. Apply a proven process to get even better Page 3
    • 4. Part IBuild a Brand as a Sales Leader: Overview and Definitions Page 4
    • 5. Leadership BrandPersonal Branding Be a Leader A brand is a promise  Leadership is a relationship kept over time. between those who aspire to lead and those who choose A Personal Brand is to follow. the Essence-of-you,  Leaders don’t get appointed. recognized by others. It’s earned through behavior. You only become a leader when other people want to follow you. Page 5
    • 6. ExerciseThink of a person- that you personally know- stands out in a positive, authentic way- and you consider as a leader in sales.What is ONE behavior or practice this persondemonstrates that makes him or her a stand outsales leader? Page 6
    • 7. Elements of a Leadership Brand1. Authentic - be real and sincere2. Relevant – demonstrate value, deliver performance3. Memorable – create a positive perception4. Timely – clear, concise, to the point5. Consistent – predictable performance Page 7
    • 8. LeadershipCredibility is the foundation of Leadership.If you don’t believe in the messenger, your won’tbelieve the message.Source: Kouzes/Posner, The Leadership Challenge Page 8
    • 9. Part IICommon Challenge We all Face Page 9
    • 10. The Trap We Fall into… Page 10
    • 11. Our ChallengeWe all have Blind Spots:Others see something in me that I don’t.We judge ourselves based on our intentions.We judge others based on their behaviors. Page 11
    • 12. Perception MattersI think I am… Others see me… Driven, determined and  Impatient, aggressive and ambitious even stubborn Smart, intelligent and  “know-it-all” guy fast-thinking Fun and humorous  Doesn’t take things seriously Page 12
    • 13. Perception ManagementPerception is affected by:1. What we say (message, delivery)2. How we look (appearance, posture, etc.)3. What we do (behavior, action)4. What others say about us (reputation, image) Page 13
    • 14. Part III Five Practices ofHigh-Performance Sales Page 14
    • 15. 1: Purpose & FocusPurpose and focus:Use time for revenue-generating activitiesIt’s not about how busy you are as a sales person,it’s about how much business you bring in. Page 15
    • 16. 2: Appropriate Measures “What gets measured gets improved.” Know your numbers Track your activity Page 16
    • 17. 3: Discipline Plan your work. Work your plan. Consistent execute, persevere, do what it takes “I cant remember the last day I didnt train.” - Michael Phelps Page 17
    • 18. 4: Develop self & others - Build confidence - Improve knowledge (product, industry) - Enhance skills “No man becomes rich unless he enriches others.” - Andrew Carnegie Page 18
    • 19. Sales CoachingSales Coach: DO’s Sales Coachee: DO’s Ask questions  Commit to improve and (Rule: 80% listening change the selected and 20% talking) behavior Challenge with clear  Follow through on the and concise questions agreements Provide encouragement  Be open, honest and and positive support introspective Page 19
    • 20. 5: Ask & Listen“The leader of the past know how to tell. The leader of thefuture knows how to ask.” - Peter Drucker Page 20
    • 21. Imagine…… someone listening, not only to the words, but also to what’s behind them – who even listens to what is not said,… some who is curious about your goals and aspirations, what makes you tick – a person who will help you clarify your goals and provide tools for action and learning towards your results,… a relationship with a person who is as committed to your goals as you are,… someone who suspends judgment while listening to you; allowing your genuine self – both your strengths and improvement areas – to shine through. You are imaging a Sales Coach. Page 21
    • 22. Part IVApply a Proven Process To Get Even Better Page 22
    • 23. How to Change a BehaviorWhat does it take to achieve a positive, lastingchange in behavior?1. Commitment and willingness to change2. Interaction and support from others3. Follow up, follow up, follow up Page 23
    • 24. Behavioral Change1. Select one behavior that you want to improveand will have a positive impact personally andprofessionally.2. Write down two reasons why you want tochange (or what benefits you will get from changingthat behavior) Page 24
    • 25. Follow UpFrom our research with 86,000 respondents:The most important variable in predicting theincreased leadership effectiveness is theleader’s interaction with co-workers.Frequency of interaction with co-workers ismore important than the duration of trainingprograms or coaching meetings.Source: Article “Leadership is a Contact Sport”, MarshallGoldsmith and Howard Morgan, strategy+business, September2004 Page 25
    • 26. Checking In1. Are you committed to make a change in the behavior you selected?2. Are you willing to support each other?3. Are you ready to follow up on a regular basis? Page 26
    • 27. Try Feedforward instead of Feedback past NOW future Feedback: Feedforward: Input or data about the past. Ideas or suggestions for the We cannot change the past, future. we can learn from it. Let others help you change. Page 27
    • 28. Support from Co-workers Try Feedforward instead of Feedback Apply Three Rules 1. 2. 3. Page 28
    • 29. Exercise: FeedforwardThe person asking for “feedforward” can onlyrespond to receiving suggestions with Thank You(listen without judgment)The person providing suggestions cannot talkabout the past. Only future suggestions areallowed. Page 29
    • 30. How to Change a BehaviorFive Tips to hold yourself accountable for change:1. Make a commitment to yourself2. Write down what you want to change3. Make a commitment to others4. Focus on the future – focus on one thing5. Stick to it. Page 30
    • 31. “You must BE the change you wish to see in the world.” -- Gandhi Page 31
    • 32. THANK YOU Tel: +1 858 793-6279simon@simonvetter.com www.simonvetter.com Page 32