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Using student experiences to deliveran employability resource aimed atdisabled studentso   Simon Ball and Lisa Featherston...
What do JISC TechDisdo? (In theory)o A leading UK advisory service on  technologies for inclusion. We explore and  promote...
What do JISC TechDisdo? (Actually)o Staff development          o TechDis Voices  o TechDis Tuesdays           o Jack & Jes...
TechDis Tuesdayso Fortnightly updates on Tuesdays, 13.00  o Intro dialogue (~10 minutes)  o Detailed discussion with deleg...
So, why am I here?o In the creation of the Toolbox (including the  Voices), we utilised students heavily to  design, devel...
TechDis Toolboxwww.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tbx
TechDis VoicesWho will benefit?o People who prefer to listen.o People who prefer to multitask.o People with better oral th...
TechDis VoicesHow do I get started?• Make sure you are eligible (post 16  learning provider in England delivering  publicl...
Community-BasedParticipatory ResearchKushalnagar, Williams and Kushalnagar (2012)“Most accessible technology research appr...
Why the Toolbox cameabout…o We asked students (via focus groups in special  schools, independent specialist provision for ...
What they said…o Feedback from students showed many had  informal support networks outside of education  environment.o It ...
So we created mini-videoso Inspired by the Commoncraft videos – parents  and carers told us they were ideal.o Here‟s an ex...
Simultaneously tothis….The Voices….We regularly received anecdotal feedback that free text-to-speech voices were:   o Too ...
BIS agreed to funddevelopment of twonational „free‟ text-to-speech voiceso CereProc won the tender, and provided us with  ...
Jack and Jesso Following the feedback on the voice of „Jack‟ we  asked Cereproc to find 7 female actors with „not  posh‟ a...
Feedback from students 1o I have quite a basic Dell laptop perhaps not as  sofisticated [sic] as some (obviously provided ...
Feedback from students 2o The files are big and the install takes a while to get  going - or perhaps my slow old PC. I use...
Feedback from students 3o Nathan, from Henshaws College  “I like using the Voice with my light writer as it  helps me chat...
Now using students fordisseminationo Both Toolbox and the Voices need to be spread  widely, at both institutional level (i...
Who are these„ambassadors‟?o We discovered that several regions have  schemes where young people are used as  informal „tr...
We decided we couldlearn a whole lot moreo The Ambassadors so astounded us we started  looking for them elsewhere. We went...
Future worko A large Ambassadors project in the South Easto www.clickstart.org – London based communities  for students wi...
This has been just a small sample of what         JISC TechDis has to offer.Visit our main website for more advice on     ...
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  • Using student experiences to deliver an employability resource aimed at disabled studentsSimon Ball and Lisa FeatherstoneJISC TechDiswww.jisctechdis.ac.ukhelpdesk@techdis.ac.uk
  • What do JISC TechDis do? (In theory)A leading UK advisory service on technologies for inclusion. We explore and promote inclusive practices, resources and advice for learning and teaching in UK higher education, and the wider further education & skills sector.
  • An introduction to our services, old and newStaff development opportunitiesTechDis TuesdaysXerte FridayAccessible IT Practice Support ProgrammeTechDis ToolboxAimed at learnersWorking smarter with technologyTechDis VoicesJack & JessText-to-speechSBRIMyDocStoreNavitextuKinectPSLT
  • TechDis TuesdaysFortnightly updates on Tuesdays, 13.00Intro dialogue (~10 minutes)Detailed discussion with delegates (~20-30 mins)Show notes to highlight further readingPodcast, transcript, discussion summary and show notes all posted onlinewww.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tdtuesdays
  • So, why am I here?In the creation of the Toolbox (including the Voices), we utilised students heavily to design, develop and disseminate the resources.First of all, a brief introduction to the resources….
  • Toolbox contains explanations and examples of current web technologies. It provides an overview of accessibility features in commonplace applications such as Microsoft Office and Google. It also suggests different tools for different needs, for instance, those with a visual impairment may find screen magnifiers or text-to-speech tools useful. Individuals with dyslexia or memory problems are advised to use task lists, calendars and reminders. The toolbox has a set of drawers to help users find the tool they need. There are five drawers in total and the first four correspond to skills that are valued by employers. The drawers are:· Technology · Planning and organisation· Communication· Teamworking· Different needs 
  • Very few people will not benefit from text to speech at some point in their work or leisure. Obvious beneficiaries include:People who prefer to listen.People who prefer to multitask.People with better oral skills than literacy skills.People who like making use of dead-time eg travelling, queuing etc.People who don’t carry around files but do carry around phones.People with print impairments.Tutors who want to give more options to learners.
  • Getting started:Make sure you are eligible (post 16 learning provider in England delivering publicly funded courses).Go to www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/voicesWatch the videos and follow the instructions and links.
  • Community-Based Participatory ResearchKushalnagar, Williams and Kushalnagar (2012) “Most accessible technology research approaches include the target population as end-users, not as community partners”“Community-Based Participatory Approach: Students as Partners in Educational Accessible Technology Research” Lecture Notes in Computer Science 7382, Computers Helping People with Special Needs, ICCHP Proceedings July 2012, Part I
  • Why the Toolbox came about…We asked students (via focus groups in special schools, independent specialist provision for young adults, mainstream colleges and students from Higher Education with diverse needs) ‘what should your tutor have told you but never did’?
  • In general the results showed that although most of the students used technology within the college or classroom situation, the technology itself was limited and usually dated. The format of the presentation materials was also determined by surveying current disabled students and recent graduates – their feedback suggested that Youtube and short video clips was the most instructive way to get a message across in a way that students would engage with. 
  • Agreement on the language to be used (to make the language as ‘familiar’ as possible to the users), and approval of scripts for audio and video files, had to be given before any resources were created and this prevented unnecessary and time consuming editing or revision of multimedia. Resources were created in the format deemed to be of most relevance to the users (an audio file, video file, step-by-step guide or a combination of these). Video and audio files were required to be less than 3 minutes in length and have little or no technical jargon to maximise both accessibility and approachability.
  • Simultaneously to this….The Voices….We regularly received anecdotal feedback that free text-to-speech voices were:Too ‘computerised’ or ‘robotic’Too oldToo AmericanMost institutions only had licenses for the ‘good’ voices for specific students, mitigating against their wider use.
  • BIS agreed to fund development of two national ‘free’ text-to-speech voicesCereProc won the tender, and provided us with voice samples from 7 young British actors.400 students provided feedback as to which they preferred (not only existing TTS users)Many were still critical: ‘too posh’, ‘too Southern’
  • Jack and JessFollowing the feedback on the voice of ‘Jack’ we asked Cereproc to find 7 female actors with ‘not posh’ and ‘not Southern’ voices.Eventually ‘Jess’ was selected from feedback from 400 students again – the first ever ‘Northern English’ text-to-speech voice.Both voices were taken back to the 400 students again who suggested re-working to better pronounce key words.
  • Feedback from students 1I have quite a basic Dell laptop perhaps not as sofisticated [sic] as some (obviously provided by my employer for the job) so chose this one to use rather than my personal computer . I think it's clear enough .I didn't read the instructions - as might be expected to be the case for many :)    
  • Feedback from students 2The files are big and the install takes a while to get going - or perhaps my slow old PC. I used Powertalk to test and the voices   are pretty good.  I did the   installation and I listened to the Jess and Jack voices in the 'Speech'   properties.  I then listened to both   voices.  Both of which sound really   great, the best I have heard.  I now   can't seem to get this to work or find instructions on how to get this to   work in the BBC news site for example.   
  • Feedback from students 3Nathan, from Henshaws College “I like using the Voice with my light writer as it helps me chat up girls”
  • Now using students for disseminationBoth Toolbox and the Voices need to be spread widely, at both institutional level (in which we have some experience) and at user level (where we have much less).Students have been absolutely key here. We have worked with a variety of ‘Ambassador’ groups such as the DOTs (Digital Outreach Trainers)
  • DOTS – 3 15 year olds in West Cumbria helping each other via their XBOXsGame2Engage – Sheffield College - iMedia Tutor, students to act as mentors for 'practical skills ' students using games technology for increased confidence and ability.  Feedback and all students have a click start wiki site.  Rix Centre - easy to build wiki/web site. using them as mentors as part of the Go Online initiative
  • We decided we could learn a whole lot moreThe Ambassadors so astounded us we started looking for them elsewhere. We went to ISCs to ask students how they used technology, both formally at college and informally at home - and some of the results were quite impressive:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mEGLlOiLHLU
  • Future workA large Ambassadors project in the South Eastwww.clickstart.org – London based communities for students with learning disabilities – we want to roll this out nationwide, possibly using InbookBid currently in for creating Northern Ireland voice(s)Many more short videos on Freemium services egEvernote, Skype, Dragon Dictate for iPhone, Twitter, Camstudio, Jing etc
  • This has been just a small sample of what JISC TechDis has to offer.Visit our main website for more advice on technologies for inclusion.www.jisctechdis.ac.uk
  • The home page of the JISC TechDis website
  • Transcript of "Raise sblf"

    1. 1. Using student experiences to deliveran employability resource aimed atdisabled studentso Simon Ball and Lisa Featherstoneo JISC TechDiso www.jisctechdis.ac.uko helpdesk@techdis.ac.uk
    2. 2. What do JISC TechDisdo? (In theory)o A leading UK advisory service on technologies for inclusion. We explore and promote inclusive practices, resources and advice for learning and teaching in UK higher education, and the wider further education & skills sector.
    3. 3. What do JISC TechDisdo? (Actually)o Staff development o TechDis Voices o TechDis Tuesdays o Jack & Jess o Xerte Friday o Text-to-speech o Accessible IT Practice o SBRI Support Programme o MyDocStoreo TechDis Toolbox o Navitext o Aimed at learners o uKinect o Working smarter with o PSLT technology
    4. 4. TechDis Tuesdayso Fortnightly updates on Tuesdays, 13.00 o Intro dialogue (~10 minutes) o Detailed discussion with delegates (~20-30 mins) o Show notes to highlight further reading o Podcast, transcript, discussion summary and show notes all posted onlineo www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tdtuesdays
    5. 5. So, why am I here?o In the creation of the Toolbox (including the Voices), we utilised students heavily to design, develop and disseminate the resources.o First of all, a brief introduction to the resources….
    6. 6. TechDis Toolboxwww.jisctechdis.ac.uk/tbx
    7. 7. TechDis VoicesWho will benefit?o People who prefer to listen.o People who prefer to multitask.o People with better oral than literacy skills.o People who like making use of dead-time eg travelling, queuing etc.o People who don‟t carry around files but do carry around phones. Listen to them.o People with print impairments.o Tutors who want to give more options to learners.
    8. 8. TechDis VoicesHow do I get started?• Make sure you are eligible (post 16 learning provider in England delivering publicly funded courses).• Go to www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/voices• Watch the videos and follow the instructions and links.
    9. 9. Community-BasedParticipatory ResearchKushalnagar, Williams and Kushalnagar (2012)“Most accessible technology research approachesinclude the target population as end-users, not ascommunity partners”“Community-Based Participatory Approach: Students asPartners in Educational Accessible Technology Research”Lecture Notes in Computer Science 7382, ComputersHelping People with Special Needs, ICCHP ProceedingsJuly 2012, Part I
    10. 10. Why the Toolbox cameabout…o We asked students (via focus groups in special schools, independent specialist provision for young adults, mainstream colleges and students from Higher Education with diverse needs) „what should your tutor have told you but never did‟?
    11. 11. What they said…o Feedback from students showed many had informal support networks outside of education environment.o It also showed that in the wider skills area, there were a lot of gaps in people‟s knowledge, and the informal support networks were the only real way of obtaining „training‟
    12. 12. So we created mini-videoso Inspired by the Commoncraft videos – parents and carers told us they were ideal.o Here‟s an example: o http://jisctechdis.ac.uk/techdis/multlinkres/detail/CC_ Wikio We commissioned similar videos to „fill the gaps‟ in basic digital literacy skills. Here‟s one example: o http://jisctechdis.ac.uk/techdis/multlinkres/detail/PDF_ ReadOnScreen
    13. 13. Simultaneously tothis….The Voices….We regularly received anecdotal feedback that free text-to-speech voices were: o Too „computerised‟ or „robotic‟ o Too old o Too AmericanMost institutions only had licenses for the „good‟ voices for specific students, mitigating against their wider use.
    14. 14. BIS agreed to funddevelopment of twonational „free‟ text-to-speech voiceso CereProc won the tender, and provided us with voice samples from 7 young British actors.o 400 students provided feedback as to which they preferred (not only existing TTS users)o Many were still critical: „too posh‟, „too Southern‟
    15. 15. Jack and Jesso Following the feedback on the voice of „Jack‟ we asked Cereproc to find 7 female actors with „not posh‟ and „not Southern‟ voices.o Eventually „Jess‟ was selected from feedback from 400 students again – the first ever „Northern English‟ text-to-speech voice.o Both voices were taken back to the 400 students again who suggested re-working to better pronounce key words.
    16. 16. Feedback from students 1o I have quite a basic Dell laptop perhaps not as sofisticated [sic] as some (obviously provided by my employer for the job) so chose this one to use rather than my personal computer . I think its clear enough .o I didnt read the instructions - as might be expected to be the case for many :)
    17. 17. Feedback from students 2o The files are big and the install takes a while to get going - or perhaps my slow old PC. I used Powertalk to test and the voices are pretty good.o I did the installation and I listened to the Jess and Jack voices in the Speech properties. I then listened to both voices. Both of which sound really great, the best I have heard. I now cant seem to get this to work or find instructions on how to get this to work in the BBC news site for example.
    18. 18. Feedback from students 3o Nathan, from Henshaws College “I like using the Voice with my light writer as it helps me chat up girls”
    19. 19. Now using students fordisseminationo Both Toolbox and the Voices need to be spread widely, at both institutional level (in which we have some experience) and at user level (where we have much less).o Students have been absolutely key here. We have worked with a variety of „Ambassador‟ groups such as the DOTs (Digital Outreach Trainers)
    20. 20. Who are these„ambassadors‟?o We discovered that several regions have schemes where young people are used as informal „trainers‟.o South Yorkshire DOTs – Digital Outreach Trainers – give an hour a week to train people on IT. o Waqas – used Toolbox to get his autistic sister online o Khaled – working with refugees in Rotherham using Toolbox and Voices to teach English and IT
    21. 21. We decided we couldlearn a whole lot moreo The Ambassadors so astounded us we started looking for them elsewhere. We went to ISCs to ask students how they used technology, both formally at college and informally at home - and some of the results were quite impressive:o http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mEGLlOiLHLU
    22. 22. Future worko A large Ambassadors project in the South Easto www.clickstart.org – London based communities for students with learning disabilities – we want to roll this out nationwide, possibly using Inbooko Bid currently in for creating Northern Ireland voice(s)o Many more short videos on Freemium services eg Evernote, Skype, Dragon Dictate for iPhone, Twitter, Camstudio, Jing etc
    23. 23. This has been just a small sample of what JISC TechDis has to offer.Visit our main website for more advice on technologies for inclusion. www.jisctechdis.ac.uk
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