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Better Safe than Sorry      protecting each other from harmDr Simon Duffy ■ The Centre for Welfare Reform■ 18th October 20...
Protection from harmExploring our options
We like to take our anger out on those who areweaker, those who cannot answer. It is a humantrait. And somehow the argumen...
We still have much still to learn
Institutions are very unsafe1. Devalued lives - self-expression and personal   development threaten institutional thinking...
Citizenship is vital to safety 1. Direction - Its risky if my life lacks meaning and    value 2. Freedom - Its risky if I ...
Citizenship is the right goal
Being in control makes people safer
Who keeps people safe?Paid staff are only one group involved in lives
Inspection regimes failService Area                            % failingUser focused services                     22%Perso...
Risk grows as we                                                                 se                                       ...
Schools can lead the way...
Jonathan’s storyFor the 3 years before 150 days in hospital -responding to problems with breathing.In the 3 years after le...
Communitysolutions can work
When is a crime not a crime? When it’s abuse ofsomeone with diminished rights.The service system is riskier than real life...
Questions1. Research - Do we know what is working and not working?2. Supported Decision-making - Do people have good   dec...
For more information go towww.centreforwelfarereform.org      These slides are © Simon Duffy 2012 ■ Publisher is The      ...
Better Safe than Sorry
Better Safe than Sorry
Better Safe than Sorry
Better Safe than Sorry
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Better Safe than Sorry

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Talk given to SACID on safety and how we might protect the interests of people who are most vulnerable to harm.

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  • Transcript of "Better Safe than Sorry"

    1. 1. Better Safe than Sorry protecting each other from harmDr Simon Duffy ■ The Centre for Welfare Reform■ 18th October 2012 ■ Adelaide, South Australia ■Presentation for SACID
    2. 2. Protection from harmExploring our options
    3. 3. We like to take our anger out on those who areweaker, those who cannot answer. It is a humantrait. And somehow the arguments to prove weare right appear out of nowhere.Alexander Solzhenitsyn“Better to be safe than to be sorry” is a remark ofvalue only when these are the actual alternatives.Idries Shah
    4. 4. We still have much still to learn
    5. 5. Institutions are very unsafe1. Devalued lives - self-expression and personal development threaten institutional thinking2. No freedom or control - it is very hard to be heard when you have no authority3. Impoverishment - economic power is nullified4. Sheltered, but homeless - a home is more than a roof - vital to control privacy and security5. ‘Care’ not support - ‘care’ already assumes the passivity and lower value of the person ‘in care’.6. Disconnected- it is other citizens who report abuse and it is structures of power within institutions that make that harder7. Loveless - the shift to focusing on abuse not crime is a symptom of institutional thinking
    6. 6. Citizenship is vital to safety 1. Direction - Its risky if my life lacks meaning and value 2. Freedom - Its risky if I cannot direct my life, communicate or be listened to. 3. Money - Its risky if I lack money or if I cannot control my own money. 4. Home - Its risky if I cannot control who I live with, my home and my privacy. 5. Help - Its risky if I’ve no one to help me and if I cannot control who helps me. 6. Life - Its risky if I am not a valued member of my community. 7. Love - Its risky to have no friends or family.
    7. 7. Citizenship is the right goal
    8. 8. Being in control makes people safer
    9. 9. Who keeps people safe?Paid staff are only one group involved in lives
    10. 10. Inspection regimes failService Area % failingUser focused services 22%Personal care 26%Protection 29%Managers and staff 33%Organisation and running of the 23%businessStandard % failingThe needs, wishes, preferences and personal goals for each user are 48%recorded in a personal service user planStaff are supervised and appraised 43%Safe procedures for medication, with users keeping 42%control where possibleRigorous recruitment and selection procedures 39%The risk of accidents for users and staff is minimised 37% CSCI Report - State of Social Care - 2005-2006 - Failure to meet minimal standards in domiciliary care agencies
    11. 11. Risk grows as we se A bu e of O ld rienc er P eop pe le’s ’s Ex Exp Hid erie den Vo ple r Peo An a nce ic of A es:institutionalise nalys Olde is of Writ calls ten b y Acti to th e Ac buse ices: on o tion n Eld on E er A lder en Vo buse and p Abus ublish e help ed by line. Hidd Help the A ged se Abu lder on E on Acti ged the A Help Action on Elder Abuse Data (2004)
    12. 12. Schools can lead the way...
    13. 13. Jonathan’s storyFor the 3 years before 150 days in hospital -responding to problems with breathing.In the 3 years after leaving hospital he has spentonly 2 nights in hospital - for elective dentaltreatments.Personalised learning - on the job - 2 City & GuildsQualifications.Saving NHS, LA & Education•Over £100,000 in hospital stays•Over £300,000 in residential care costs•Over £100,000 of funding contributed by the LSC
    14. 14. Communitysolutions can work
    15. 15. When is a crime not a crime? When it’s abuse ofsomeone with diminished rights.The service system is riskier than real life - so thesolution to risk cannot be a service solution.Begin at the beginning - if we are weak,disconnected and unable to articulate our rightscan we expect the system to take our rightsseriously?
    16. 16. Questions1. Research - Do we know what is working and not working?2. Supported Decision-making - Do people have good decision-making systems around them as a matter of right?3. Control - Are people in control of their life and support?4. Leadership - Do services understand how to raise standards and tackle abuse?5. A citizen’s duty - Do all citizens - including staff - have a legal obligation to report crimes against those who can’t themselves?6. Policing - Do the police take these crimes seriously?7. Justice - Do people get a good chance of justice from criminal justice system?8. Voice - How do we strengthen the voice of advocacy?
    17. 17. For more information go towww.centreforwelfarereform.org These slides are © Simon Duffy 2012 ■ Publisher is The Centre for Welfare Reform ■ Slides can be distributed subject to conditions set out at www.centreforwelfarereform.org ■
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