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Tools and Approaches for Involving
Children with learning disabilities and
little or no verbal communication in
Inspection...
No “Fix all”
• No one miracle tool
• No one approach that will work with
everyone
• Tools and approaches in this project
n...
Why this project?
• Identified by CSCI User and Public
Involvement Team as needed
• The literature review showed that
the ...
How did the project work?
• Small project (3 inspectors and one care
home for children with learning
disabilities, aged 8-...
How did we come up with
the findings?
• Interviews with the children were video
taped
• Interviews with Peer Informant chi...
The introduction and
opt out tools
(Handout 1 and 2)

• Consent is crucial and sometimes
difficult to obtain
• As inspecto...
(Handout 3, 4 and 5)

“You wouldn’t go up to someone in the town
centre on a Saturday morning, cold, and say
“right I am g...
The Communication
Information Tool
(Handout 6)

• Must be familiar with person’s preferred
mode of communication when plan...
Vocabulary
• A “language” the person understands
• Age appropriate and culturally
appropriate
• Not restricted by negative...
Peer Informants
• Not there to represent the views of the
people you are going to use the
vocabulary with
• Own views as p...
Topics
• Food
• Outdoor activities
• Indoor activities
• Staff support
Questions prompt sheet
(Handout 7)

• Complex

- one subject, one
question at a time

• Subjective

- clear, concise,
inte...
Talking MatsTM
Information
• Joan Murphy & Lois Cameron for AAC
Research Unit, Stirling University
• Talking Mats & Learni...
My Contact Details
• Sam Sly Regulation Inspector
• CSCI
• Linhay Business Park
• Ashburton
• TQ13 7UP
• 01364 651 800
• S...
Tools and Approaches for Involving Children with Learning Disabilities in Inspection
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Tools and Approaches for Involving Children with Learning Disabilities in Inspection

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Sam Sly of Beyond Limits (http://www.beyondlimits-uk.org) shares findings from her MSc project about approaches and tools to involve children with learning disabilities and little or no verbal communication in the Inspection process.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education
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Transcript of "Tools and Approaches for Involving Children with Learning Disabilities in Inspection"

  1. 1. Tools and Approaches for Involving Children with learning disabilities and little or no verbal communication in Inspection An MSc action research project carried out by Sam Sly
  2. 2. No “Fix all” • No one miracle tool • No one approach that will work with everyone • Tools and approaches in this project not designed for communicating with people with profound learning disabilities or autistic spectrum disorder
  3. 3. Why this project? • Identified by CSCI User and Public Involvement Team as needed • The literature review showed that the most needed and least researched area was gaining views of children with little or no verbal communication • Personal interest
  4. 4. How did the project work? • Small project (3 inspectors and one care home for children with learning disabilities, aged 8-19) • All the children, staff, inspectors and the manager of the home were participants with an equal say • 9 children acted as Peer Informants • 6 children were interviewed • Inspectors and staff met as focus groups throughout the project to reflect and plan the next steps
  5. 5. How did we come up with the findings? • Interviews with the children were video taped • Interviews with Peer Informant children, staff and Inspectors after interviews were audio taped • All the tapes were written up and themes emerged that were then confirmed by participants to be a true reflection of their views • The tools were improved and modified throughout the project as they were tested out
  6. 6. The introduction and opt out tools (Handout 1 and 2) • Consent is crucial and sometimes difficult to obtain • As inspectors we need to introduce ourselves and give information in ways that are understood • Consent is a continual process, not a one-off statement • Interviewees need to be able to opt in or out at any time
  7. 7. (Handout 3, 4 and 5) “You wouldn’t go up to someone in the town centre on a Saturday morning, cold, and say “right I am going to talk to you about some of the most intimate details of your life” and then say “thanks very much, bye!” and expect to get anything now would you?” “To be honest Providers have been very professional and very tolerant of us. It is appalling that we are being sent in to inspect without the ability to communicate” Comments from Inspector during project
  8. 8. The Communication Information Tool (Handout 6) • Must be familiar with person’s preferred mode of communication when planning the interview • Useful to know something about the person in relation to the topics you are going to talk about • Can prove evidence of how well the staff know the communication needs of the person
  9. 9. Vocabulary • A “language” the person understands • Age appropriate and culturally appropriate • Not restricted by negative perceptions and prejudice • Give opportunities, going beyond the life experiences of the person • Be relevant to that person • Be interesting to them!
  10. 10. Peer Informants • Not there to represent the views of the people you are going to use the vocabulary with • Own views as people with similar life experiences • Shared communication needs • Similar outlooks and life experiences • But can give their views more fully
  11. 11. Topics • Food • Outdoor activities • Indoor activities • Staff support
  12. 12. Questions prompt sheet (Handout 7) • Complex - one subject, one question at a time • Subjective - clear, concise, interesting, understandable • Very personal • Closed “Yes” or - “open” style to enable decision making and “No” answers choice
  13. 13. Talking MatsTM Information • Joan Murphy & Lois Cameron for AAC Research Unit, Stirling University • Talking Mats & Learning Disabilities Pack • Talking Mats & Frail Older People Pack • AAC Research Unit, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA • 01786 467645 info@aacscotland.com
  14. 14. My Contact Details • Sam Sly Regulation Inspector • CSCI • Linhay Business Park • Ashburton • TQ13 7UP • 01364 651 800 • Samantha.Sly@csci.gsi.gov.uk
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