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(166) launch of the centre (westminster, march 2011)

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Slides from the Centre for Welfare Reform Westminster Launch on 24th March 2011- presentations from Simon Duffy, Pippa Murray, Clare Hyde, Craig Dearden-Phillips and Vidhya Alakeson

Slides from the Centre for Welfare Reform Westminster Launch on 24th March 2011- presentations from Simon Duffy, Pippa Murray, Clare Hyde, Craig Dearden-Phillips and Vidhya Alakeson

Published in: News & Politics

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  • The inability of current services, health, education and social care to make a sustained difference to the lives of disabled children and their families results in distress and inequality. The way that support to disabled families is part and parcel of safeguarding and child protection takes away from the simple fact that most disabled families simply want help to get on with the business of family life. Parents want to give their children the best childhood they can and, in doing that, equip them for adulthood. Parents are looking for straightforward solutions to the pressures they face: an extra pair of hands to help out with household chores, a night’s sleep, someone to help their disabled son go to cubs or their disabled daughter go to a dance class, flexibility to use support when they need it most. Disabled children want opportunities for friendship and fun; their brothers and sisters want to hang out with their friends and have quality family time. The Personalised Pathway offers the opportunity for these things to happen in a way that transforms family life; provides greater equity; makes things fairer, and allows scarce resources to go further. \n\n
  • The inability of current services, health, education and social care to make a sustained difference to the lives of disabled children and their families results in distress and inequality. The way that support to disabled families is part and parcel of safeguarding and child protection takes away from the simple fact that most disabled families simply want help to get on with the business of family life. Parents want to give their children the best childhood they can and, in doing that, equip them for adulthood. Parents are looking for straightforward solutions to the pressures they face: an extra pair of hands to help out with household chores, a night’s sleep, someone to help their disabled son go to cubs or their disabled daughter go to a dance class, flexibility to use support when they need it most. Disabled children want opportunities for friendship and fun; their brothers and sisters want to hang out with their friends and have quality family time. The Personalised Pathway offers the opportunity for these things to happen in a way that transforms family life; provides greater equity; makes things fairer, and allows scarce resources to go further. \n\n
  • Nadia is a young woman whose family have ensured she has been included in the mainstream – in the family and in the local community. Nadia has been brought up to believe in herself – she has high aspirations. At the age of 18 she has a team of personal assistants and has plans to study, travel and work. \n\n
  • In order to work towards giving vulnerable families a fair start we have to begin thinking and talking about what we mean by fairness? What are the values we – as citizens – want our society to be built on? We live at a time when our global political system is rife with unethical practice and a lack of integrity. Values have been replaced by doctrines. What goes for political dialogue is actually a hostile exchange of blame and one up-manship. Political rhetoric is shown to be no more than empty promises as time and again our leaders fail to lead by example. \n\nA Fair Start for disabled children and their families will only be possible when we engage with some of these fundamental issues. And we have to start with ourselves. As we innovate we have to do so with honesty, integrity, love and humility. As leaders we have to believe in ourselves, be prepared to make ourselves vulnerable, and let others see who we are. It is only when we have compassion for ourselves that we will show true compassion to others. When individuals doing this come together, we cannot help but create the conditions necessary for a fair society. \n\nThat is why I am so pleased that Simon has set up the Centre for Welfare Reform, and proud to be associated with it.\n\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. The Launch of The Centre for Welfare Reform 24th March 2011 with thanks to Bircham Dyson Bell
    • 2. Phillip Collins:The Prospects for Radical Welfare
    • 3. Reform?Reform?Aren’t things bad enoughalready?
    • 4. The Poverty Net
    • 5. From a ‘professional gift’ to Citizenship
    • 6. and some solutions are• Integrated tax-benefit system - with guaranteed minimum family incomes• Personalisation in health, care and education• Effective system of constitutional rights to support and control• Restoration of local communities and meaningful local autonomy
    • 7. But resistance is• Public confused and suspicious• Producers threatened by accountability• Politicians enjoy their patronage of the welfare system• Civil servants are experts in protecting the status quo
    • 8. So howfor change still needs to be made will change happen• The case• People need to be engaged and involved• More thought, research and debate is required• Further action, experiment and innovation is neededCreate a community ofpassionate, thoughtfuland practical people -committed to equality &diversity
    • 9. The Centre forWelfare Reform is:A growingcommunityof Fellows workingindependently andtogether...
    • 10. to implementpracticalinnovations withinthe current system...
    • 11. to share what welearn...
    • 12. quietly, withoutfuss or competition. • Values - human equality, and the value of diversity • R&D - focused research, practical development and publication • Network - partners, Fellows, subscribers • Tiny hub - low cost, small, private, social enterprise Do good work and lie low - Lao Tzu
    • 13. Clare Hyde MBELocal Justice: family-focused• 72% of male and 70% of female sentenced prisoners suffer from 2 or more mental health disorders. 20% of prisoners have 4 of the 5 major mental health disorders.• 71% of children in custody have been involved with, or in the care of, social services before entering custody.• 74% of children released from custody in 2008 reoffended within a year.• 83,000 in prison: 47% of adults are re-convicted within 1 year of being released (for those serving sentences of less than 1 year this increases to 60%). For those who have served more than 10 previous custodial sentences the rate of reoffending rises to 76%• Over half the women in prison report having suffered
    • 14. to the power of 41. Women and Children First - Start with a focus on women, children and families.2. Local Justice Reinvestment - Create a new financial system where local areas have an incentive to invest in their own communities.3. Total Place - Change the way funding is used locally.4. Personalisation - Use personalisation as the key to unlock family problems.
    • 15. Family Justice...
    • 16. Vidhya AlakesonActive Patient: the real power shift in the• Effective chronic disease management depends more on people than doctors• Individual preferences matter to the outcomes of healthcare• Healthcare should be about improving people’s lives not just providing a service• Current evidence for more individual control in health is limited but positive
    • 17. Craig Dearden-Phillips MBEOutside the State: the civil societyMy first socialbusiness was abouthelping people repairthe damage done tothem by publicservices
    • 18. My second social business is abouthelping to liberate people inside publicservices...to ‘step out’ into the needs-marketplace
    • 19. We have reached peak state: The era of ever- more politicallydirected spend is over
    • 20. This is whatpublicservices feellike to agreat manypeople whodepend onthem
    • 21. QuestionSo how do weprovidepersonalisedservices forall thesepeople?
    • 22. Answerplurality ofprovisionANDrobust protectionfor diverse,inclusive publicservice markets
    • 23. Coalition’s Dilemma Big Society = Small Scale Local Diverse Co-produced, InnovativeEntrepreneurial
    • 24. Coalition’s DilemmaReality could =Efficiency agendaPrivate MonopolyLow innovationLow levelsof social capital
    • 25. Which will Prevail? Right toAny WillingProviderPublic Services Vs. Challenge and Right to Run (in the LocalismWhite Paper Bill) Social Value Bill
    • 26. • Support the emergence of genuine - social enterprise providers• Provide a bulwark against private monopolies• Create for mutual ownership to show its benefits• Demand higher levels of social capital and co- production
    • 27. Dr Pippa MurrayA Fair Start: a personalised pathway fordisabled children and their families
    • 28. Personalised Pathway
    • 29. I am excited about personalisation as I think it can really changethings for disabled people. Personal budgets have allowed me to have more control over my own support and
    • 30. But, what do we need to consider• What do we mean by fairness?• What are our core values?• How do keep our values at the centre of our innovations?
    • 31. Simon DuffyFamily Security: reforming tax and The Current tax-benefit system:• Poor incentives - undermines citizenship, earning, saving, personal development and risk- taking• Wrong focus - undermines family life, women and children• No rights - does not establish clear and transparent securities that are essential for citizenship
    • 32. The current system panders to criticalvoters and abandons any universal
    • 33. We need a new deal - one we understand1. Focus on family security - remove stigma and complexity2. Integrate tax and benefits - remove stigma and complexity3. Take means-testing out of benefits - we’ve already paid our taxes4. Define minimum level of eligibility for all - transparently define a level sufficient for citizenship5. Constitutional rights to support and control - clear law that can be tested and protected6. Robust organisational framework - escape the era of ‘organisational fixes’ and the on-going fiddling
    • 34. We will do the right thing-eventually -after we’ve tried everyfeasible alternative Honour can exist anywhere, love can exist anywhere, but justice can exist only among people who found their relationships upon it.
    • 35. Emails for Fellows: A Big Thank You to everyonepippa@ibkinitiatives.com at BDB forclare@foundationforfamilies.org.uk supporting this event -craig@stepping-out.biz especially Liz, Alexandra,vidhya.alakeson@resolutionfoundatio Angela, David &n.org Nigel The Centre for Welfare Reform The Quadrant, 99 Parkway Avenue, Parkway Business Park Sheffield, S9 4WG T +44 114 251 1790 | M +44 7729 7729 41 admin@centreforwelfarereform.org Get a free subscription at: www.centreforwelfarereform.org © 2011 Rights Reserved. Full copyright details at www.centreforwelfarereform.org

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