Online Lead Generation B2 C Report 2009
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Online Lead Generation B2 C Report 2009

  • 1,100 views
Uploaded on

Market research report on online lead generation

Market research report on online lead generation

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,100
On Slideshare
1,071
From Embeds
29
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 29

http://www.lmodules.com 22
https://www.linkedin.com 4
http://www.linkedin.com 3

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Market Data / Supplier Selection / Event Presentations / User Experience Benchmarking / Best Practice / Template Files/  Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media
  • 2. Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Published July 2009 Econsultancy London Econsultancy New York 4th Floor, The Corner 41 East 11th St., 11th Floor 91-93 Farringdon Road New York, NY 10003 London EC1M 3LN United States All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be United Kingdom reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, Telephone: electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording Telephone: +1 212 699 3626 or any information storage and retrieval system, without +44 (0)20 7269 1450 prior permission in writing from the publisher. http://econsultancy.com Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009 help@econsultancy.com
  • 3. Contents 1. Executive Summary and Highlights ................................ 1 2. About Econsultancy ......................................................... 4 3. About Clash-Media .......................................................... 5 4. Methodology and Sample ................................................ 6 4.1. Methodology ............................................................................. 6 4.2. Respondent profiles .................................................................. 6 4.2.1. Annual company turnover ......................................................... 7 4.2.2. Geography ................................................................................... 8 4.2.3. Business sector ........................................................................... 9 4.2.4. Channel to market / audience ................................................. 10 5. Findings .......................................................................... 11 5.1. Growth and importance of online lead generation ................... 11 5.1.1. Use of online lead generation to grow B2C businesses .......... 11 5.1.2. Benefits of online lead generation ...........................................13 5.1.3. Use of online lead generation in the last year ......................... 15 5.1.4. Importance of online lead generation in the next year ..........16 5.2. How companies generate consumer leads ............................... 17 5.2.1. Offline methods to generate consumer leads.......................... 17 5.2.2. Online methods to generate consumer leads ......................... 20 5.3. Lead Generation budgets ........................................................ 23 5.3.1. Online lead generation spend ................................................. 23 5.3.2. Split of budgets for online lead generation ............................ 26 5.3.4. Change in overall marketing spend ........................................ 28 5.3.5. Split of lead generation budget ............................................... 30 5.3.6. Change in online lead generation budget ................................31 5.3.7. Reasons for change in budgets ................................................ 32 5.4. Effectiveness and measurement .............................................. 33 5.4.1. Effectiveness of online lead generation methods .................. 33 5.4.2. Offline conversion of online leads........................................... 36 5.4.4. How online leads are converted .............................................. 38 5.4.5. Measuring the effectiveness of online lead generation ......... 40 5.4.6. Assessing online lead generation campaigns ..........................41 5.4.7. Problems encountered with online lead generation .............. 42 5.5. Online lead generation in international markets .................... 43 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 4. 5.5.1. Selling in other markets outside of home country................. 43 5.5.2. Online lead generation campaigns in international markets ..................................................................................... 44 5.5.3. Has the recession encouraged international sales? ............... 45 5.5.4. Factors preventing companies from selling internationally .......................................................................... 46 5.5.5. Problems encountered with lead generation in other countries ................................................................................... 48 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 5. 1. Executive Summary and Highlights This is the third annual Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report published by Econsultancy in association with lead generation specialist Clash-Media. There were more than 600 respondents to our 2009 research request, which took the form of an online survey in May and June 2009. Respondents included both client-side (in-house) organisations who are trying to get new leads for their B2C products or services, and agencies or consultancies (supply-side) who are involved in trying to generate leads for their clients. Key results are broken down into the following regions: UK, Europe (non-UK) and US. Key findings:  Online lead generation (OLG) is becoming more important for companies who are increasingly using digital channels to generate business.  Two thirds of company respondents (65%) say that their use of online lead generation has increased in the last year, compared to only 11% who say that it has decreased. Furthermore, 88% of responding organisations say that this activity will become more important to their organisations over the next 12 months.  The most widely perceived benefit of online lead generation is the ability to increase the prospect list and customer base, seen as a benefit by 73% of company respondents.  The majority of client-side respondents also see cost effectiveness (72%) and the ability to target (60%) as benefits. For supply-side respondents, the most widely perceived benefit is its cost-effectiveness.  However, fewer than half of companies (47%) say they are effectively exploiting online lead generation as a way of growing their B2C business. This compares to 44% last year and 48% in 2007. Respondents in Europe (53%) are mostly likely to be using OLG effectively.  There has been a significant 12% drop in the proportion of companies using paid search for generating consumer leads, from 71% (in both 2008 and 2007) to 59% in 2009. Natural search (SEO) and email marketing (in-house lists) are still the most widely used methods and have held steady at 76% and 74% respectively.  Surprisingly, despite the recession, there are still more companies who, in the last year, have increased their overall marketing budget rather than decreased it (53% compared to 27%). Other findings: How companies generate consumer leads  There is a continued trend towards decreased use of offline channels for generating consumer leads. The proportion of companies using newspapers and magazines to generate leads has decreased from 65% in 2008 to 54%. Figure 18 shows the change in offline methods used since 2007.  The biggest decrease is for direct mail where there has been a 12% drop from 50% of businesses in 2008 to only 38% of businesses. Radio has fallen from 21% in 2008 to just 12% of companies.  Apart from paid search, the online channels which have seen a fall in use for lead generation since 2007 are online display advertising (down 7%) and viral marketing (down 20%). Effectiveness of lead generation  There have been slight decreases since 2007 in the proportion of company respondents saying that SEO (-6%), paid search (-7%) and email marketing in-house Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 1 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 6. lists (-6%) are very effective for generating leads. There has been a larger (15%) drop for rich media.  Companies are more likely to be generating leads online with the intention of converting them offline. The percentage of respondents who say this is „very much part of our strategy‟ has increased from 40% last year to 45% in 2009.  Companies are still struggling to measure the effectiveness of their lead generation activity, with only a third saying they are „excellent‟ (7%) or „good‟ (26%) at this. This compares to 43% who say they are „average‟ (26%), „poor‟ (15%) or „very poor‟ (2%) at this.  Quality of leads and return on investment are seen as the most important factors when assessing online lead generation campaigns. Budgets  The average proportion of lead generation budget which is spent online has increased to 61% from 53% in 2008.  Half of UK companies are spending at least £10,000 a year on online lead generation.  On average, paid search gets 22% of online lead generation budgets, still the highest proportion for any digital channel but a 6% drop since 2007 and an 11% drop since last year.  SEO gets 17% and, again on average, 16% goes to email marketing in-house lists. Five per cent of budget goes to online lead generation specialists. International markets  Just over two thirds (68%) of companies who sell in international markets carry out online lead generation in other countries, but around a third (32%) do not.  38% of company respondents say that the recession has encouraged them to sell in other international markets.  The biggest factors preventing companies from selling in other international markets are: products and services not relevant abroad (32%), the cost of building a team (23%) and lack of understanding about local markets (17%). Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 2 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 7. 1. Introduction by Clash-Media (survey sponsor) Online Lead Generation (OLG) is a critical digital marketing activity for businesses in a wide range of sectors. SMEs, prominent charities and global blue chips all rely on OLG to acquire potential customers and boost the performance of their marketing campaigns. Marketing budgets are scrutinised at any time, but even more so at a time when cost containment is a high priority. Because of this pressure, it is essential that any investment in marketing can show clear paths to a strong return. Online Lead Generation has a very transparent cost structure. It is straightforward to see each lead's origins and quality – and companies can then pay only for data on interested consumers that meet their criteria. This makes the service highly cost-effective and gives each lead higher value. Increased data quality will help companies drive down their cost per acquisition (CPA) which is a clear indicator of ROI. OLG provides organisations the ability to quickly set up and gather leads; it has the advantage of being highly results-driven, which is one of the reasons overall spend is up on last year. In a difficult financial climate, companies, regardless of size, need good quality data on interested consumers in order to generate new business and revenue. We are finding now that major global blue chips are placing an increased importance on our performance-based approaches. This report looks at the wide range of digital marketing strategies – such as SEO, Paid Search, Affiliate Marketing, Email Marketing and Online Display advertising. Clash-Media specialises in Ad-based OLG which is highly flexible and targeted compared to many of the other methods talked about. It combines elements of affiliate marketing, email marketing and display advertising. It is important to remember that Online Lead Generation can be used as an independent campaign – standing on its own to find new potential customers based on a specific offer that is promoted only on the Internet – or alternatively, it can be used very effectively, particularly ad- based OLG, as part of a wider campaign. For example large traditional campaigns – TV, Newspapers and Posters – can be boosted by tying in an OLG campaign, because they are results- driven and can give a directly measurable return for the advertising spend. OLG campaigns are tailored to suit each advertiser‟s individual requirements, allowing full control over delivery, quantity and the quality of interested consumer data received. We feel that this Econsultancy research report, which Clash-Media is delighted to sponsor, shows that companies are becoming much more familiar with the broad range of digital marketing services available and are starting to reap the real benefits. The signs are that 2009 should be a really exciting year for marketers to use a wide range of rapidly developing Online Lead Generation options and enhance their customer conversion rates. Simon Wajcenberg, CEO, Clash-Media simon@clash-media.com Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 3 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 8. 2. About Econsultancy Econsultancy is the leading source of independent advice and insight on digital marketing and e- commerce. Our reports, events, online resources and training programmes help a community of over 80,000 registered marketers make better decisions, build business cases, find the best suppliers, look smart in meetings and accelerate their careers. Econsultancy is an award-winning online publisher of reports covering best practice, user experience benchmarking, market data, trends and innovation, and supplier selection aimed at internet professionals that want practical advice on all aspects of e-business. Econsultancy also operates a highly popular training division, used by some of the world‟s most prominent brands for staff education, both in-house and via public courses. We provide training across all areas of digital marketing and at all levels from one day courses to diplomas to Masters in Digital Marketing. In addition, we host more than 100 conferences and events a year, such as The Online Marketing Masterclass, regular Supplier Showcases and Roundtables, an annual Future of Digital Marketing event, Digital Cream and a range of social events. The Econsultancy site now attracts 175,000 unique users per month where they access research, read the blog and take part in discussions in the forums. And as a portal to the digital marketing community, Econsultancy members can also link up with other members and digital suppliers through our directories, as well as find a new job or new digital talent using the job listings. Some of Econsultancy‟s client-side members include: Google, Yahoo, MSN, MySpace, BBC, BT, Shell, Vodafone, Yell.com, Dell, Oxfam, Virgin Atlantic, TUI, Barclays, Carphone Warehouse, IPC Media, Deloitte, T-Mobile and Estée Lauder. Join Econsultancy today to learn what‟s happening in digital marketing – and what works. Call us to find out more on +44 (0)20 7269 1450 or contact us online. http://econsultancy.com Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 4 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 9. 3. About Clash-Media Clash-Media, the sponsor of this research, has achieved significant growth over the last three years, positioning itself as the global market leader for Online Lead Generation. The company was recently named as one of the Top 15 fastest growing digital media companies according to GP Bullhound, the leading technology investment bank. Clash-Media delivers a global and fully transparent Online Lead Generation service that connects advertisers with consumers. It is a full-circle customer acquisition solution that collects and manages prospective customer data for its clients, producing qualified leads in line with advertisers‟ exact specifications to deliver a strong return on investment. Clash-Media provides its clients with a centralised managed service to support any lead generation campaign. It has established a wide global network of partners that enables it to operate in any market around the world, and its quality control processes and technologies maintain the highest standard of lead generation. Clash-Media, based in London, launched in the UK in 2006. Clash-Media currently has offices in London, New York, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Munich and Paris, with plans to expand into Spain and Italy, followed by Asia-Pacific. Clash-Media works with partners that include MSN, Tiscali and MySpace, generating leads for global brands including O2, MBNA and T-Mobile. More information about Clash-Media is available at: http://www.clash-media.com/ Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 5 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 10. 4. Methodology and Sample 4.1. Methodology This is Econsultancy‟s third Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report carried out in association with Clash-Media. There were more than 600 respondents to our research request, which took the form of an online survey1 in May and June 2009. Respondents included both client-side (in-house) organisations who are currently trying to get new leads for their B2C products or services, and supply-side respondents (agencies and technology companies) who are involved in trying to get new leads for their clients. The findings are shown for client-side (i.e. „company respondents‟) and supply-side („agency respondents‟) separately. Information about the survey, including the link, was emailed to Econsultancy‟s user base and promoted online via Twitter and other channels. The incentive for taking part was access to a complimentary copy of this report just before its publication on the Econsultancy website. If you have any questions about the research, please email Econsultancy‟s Research Director, Linus Gregoriadis (Linus@econsultancy.com). 4.2. Respondent profiles Just over a third (37%) of respondents work for companies involved in trying to get new leads for B2C products or services compared to 41% for the supply-side. There were 237 client-side respondents and 261 agency respondents. The remainder did not fall into either of these categories. Figure 1: Which of the following most accurately reflects your involvement with B2C lead generation? Response: 633 1 Econsultancy uses Clicktools for its online surveys Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 6 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 11. 4.2.1. Annual company turnover Two thirds (65%) of respondents work for companies with annual revenues of at least £1 million. A fifth of companies (20%) have an annual turnover of more than £150 million. The supply-side respondents [Figure 3] typically work for smaller businesses, with half saying that they have annual revenues of less than £1 million. Companies Figure 2: What is your annual company turnover (revenue)? Response: 167 Agencies Figure 3: What is your annual company turnover (revenue)? Response: 189 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 7 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 12. 4.2.2. Geography Just over half of company respondents in this survey are UK-based, with most of the remainder based in the United States or mainland Europe. „Other‟ countries represented include Australia, India and South Africa. The agency sample is slightly more UK-centric with just under half of respondents (47%). Companies Figure 4: In which country/region are you (personally) based? Response: 189 Agencies Figure 5: In which country/region are you (personally) based? Response: 238 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 8 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 13. 4.2.3. Business sector The most strongly represented sectors among the company respondents are consultancy and marketing services (35 respondents), retail (26 respondents), financial services (18 respondents) and travel (13 respondents). „Other‟ in this context includes educational services, professional services and software vendors. Figure 5: In which business sector is your organisation? Response: 172 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 9 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 14. 4.2.4. Channel to market / audience The majority of companies surveyed are multichannel organisations, using both offline and online channels to market. Just under a third of respondents (30%) are online only, compared to 6% who are offline only . There are slightly fewer multichannel companies surveyed compared to last year; 65% compared to 73% in 2008. Companies Figure 6: Which of the following best describes your organisation in terms of channel to market / channel to audience? Response: 236 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 10 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 15. 5. Findings 5.1. Growth and importance of online lead generation 5.1.1. Use of online lead generation to grow B2C businesses Since 2008, there has been a slight increase in the number of respondents who say that their company is effectively exploiting lead generation as a way of growing B2C business (47% compared to 44% last year). But despite this slight increase, it is apparent that the majority of organisations are still failing to get the most out of online lead generation. The agency results [Figure 8] show that more agencies now think their clients are making effective use of online lead generation, as this has increased to 48%, up from 38% last year. While this is good news for the industry, 52% of agencies still think that their clients could be using this type of marketing more effectively. Figure 9 shows these results split by geography. Companies in Europe are most likely to believe that they are effectively using online lead generation. Companies Figure 7: Would you say that your organisation is effectively exploiting online lead generation as a way of growing B2C business? Response: 209 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 11 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 16. Agencies Figure 8: Would you say that your clients are typically exploiting online lead generation effectively as a way of growing B2C business? Response: 237 Figure 9: Breakdown by geography Note: Differences between geographies may not be statistically significant due to smaller sample sizes outside the UK . Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 12 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 17. 5.1.2. Benefits of online lead generation Online lead generation is perceived to offer a wide range of business benefits. The ability to increase the customer base and build a prospect list is the most widely understood benefit of OLG, as cited by 73% of companies surveyed. Cost effectiveness (72%), the ability to target consumers (60%), and the ability to qualify leads (50%) are the next most widely perceived benefits. According to supply-side respondents [Figure 11], cost effectiveness (69%) is the most significant benefit, followed by the ability to target (63%). The performance-based nature of online generation is more „front of mind‟ for agencies than for companies, as 55% of supply-side respondents see this as a key benefit, compared to 35% of the client-side sample. Figure 12 shows the variations by geography. Note: respondents could check multiple options Company Figure 10: What do you see as the benefits of online lead generation? Response: 210 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 13 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 18. Agencies Figure 11: What do you see as the benefits of online lead generation? Response: 238 Figure 12: Benefits of online lead generation – breakdown by geography Note: Differences between geographies may not be statistically significant due to smaller sample sizes outside the UK . Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 14 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 19. 5.1.3. Use of online lead generation in the last year Two thirds of companies (65%) say that their use of online lead generation has increased in the last year. This is a positive development for the industry, and indicates that more companies are experimenting with online lead generation, even though the majority still feel that they are not exploiting it as well as they could. Even more agencies (78%) say that their clients have started to use online lead generation more in the last year [Figure 14]. Companies Figure 13: Has your use of online lead generation increased or decreased in the last year? Response: 210 Agencies Figure 14: Has the use of online lead generation by clients typically increased or decreased in the last year? Response: 236 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 15 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 20. 5.1.4. Importance of online lead generation in the next year Following on from the results above, the vast majority of companies (88%) expect online lead generation to become more important in the next 12 months, and this proportion has slightly increased since 2008. The results for agencies [Figure 16] are similar, and again shows only a very small minority (2% of agencies surveyed) expecting online lead generation to become less important. Some 10% of companies and agencies expect the importance of lead generation to remain static over the coming year. Companies Figure 15: Do you expect online lead generation to become more or less important to your organisation over the next 12 months? Response: 238 Agencies Figure 16: Do you expect online lead generation to become more or less important to your clients over the next 12 months? Response: 238 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 16 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 21. 5.2. How companies generate consumer leads 5.2.1. Offline methods to generate consumer leads Figure 17 shows the different offline methods used by responding companies to generate consumer leads, whilst Figure 18 shows the net change in the use of different methods since 2007. Press (i.e. newspapers and magazines) is still the most frequently used offline method to generate consumer leads, as specified by 54% of companies. However, as Figure 18 shows, this has fallen by 7% in the last two years. Direct mail (postal data) is currently used by 38% of companies of surveyed, but has shown the biggest fall in the last couple of years. There has been a sharp drop of 13% since 2007 in the number of companies using direct mail to generate consumer leads. Radio has also fallen significantly (by 10%) but television has been more resilient with a fifth of companies (20%) still using this medium to generate leads. TV is up 3% since 2007 but down 3% compared to last year. Around 20% of companies do not use any of these methods to generate leads. Companies are increasingly looking for demonstrable cost-effectiveness from media channels, which may explain why companies are focusing more on online methods where there is typically a greater ability to measure success. Figure 19 shows the equivalent results for agencies surveyed, whilst Figure 20 shows the change in these agency results since 2007. More encouragingly for offline media, there have been increases for direct mail (up 7%), television (up 16%) and radio (up 4%). Companies Figure 17: Which offline methods do you use to generate consumer leads? Response: 179 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 17 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 22. Companies Figure 18: Change in offline methods used since 2007 Agencies Figure 19: Which offline methods do your clients typically use to generate consumer leads? Response: 208 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 18 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 23. Agencies Figure 20: Change in offline methods used since 2007 Figure 21: Breakdown of offline methods used by geography Note: Differences between geographies may not be statistically significant due to smaller sample sizes outside the UK . Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 19 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 24. 5.2.2. Online methods to generate consumer leads There has been a significant 12% drop in the proportion of companies using paid search for generating consumer leads, from 71% (in both 2008 and 2007) to 59% in 2009. Natural search (SEO) and email marketing (in-house lists) are still the most widely used methods and have held steady at 76% and 74% respectively. In general, as Figure 23 highlights, the use of online methods has fallen slightly over the last two years although, apart from PPC and viral marketing (-20%), the decreases are typically small. The use of email marketing in-house lists has risen by 2% and content distribution and RSS has increased by 8%. Companies Figure 22: Which online methods do you use to generate consumer leads? Response: 182 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 20 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 25. Companies Figure 23: Change in online methods used since 2007 Response: 182 Agencies Figure 24: Which online methods do your clients typically use to generate consumer leads? Response: 208 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 21 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 26. Agencies Figure 25: Change in online methods used since 2007 Figure 26: Breakdown of online methods used by geography Note: Differences between geographies may not be statistically significant due to smaller sample sizes outside the UK. Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 22 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 27. 5.3. Lead Generation budgets 5.3.1. Online lead generation spend Figure 27 and Figure 28 show the amount of money being spent on online lead generation by UK companies and non-UK companies respectively. For the UK, half of companies are spending at least £10,000 a year. Outside the UK, 72% of companies are spending at least $10,000 a year. Even taking the exchange rate into account, UK companies appear to be spending slightly less on online lead generation than abroad. Companies - UK Figure 27: How much do you spend on online lead generation per year? Response: 177 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 23 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 28. Companies – non UK Figure 28: How much do you spend on online lead generation per year? Response: 97 Supply-side respondents [Figure 29] report higher levels of spending on OLG and this may be because they typically represent larger organisations with bigger budgets. A third of UK agency respondents (34%) say that their clients typically spend more than £100,000 a year. Agencies - UK Figure 29: How much do your clients typically spend on online lead generation per year? Response: 93 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 24 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 29. Agencies – non UK Figure 30: How much do you spend on online lead generation per year? Response: 109 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 25 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 30. 5.3.2. Split of budgets for online lead generation On average, paid search gets the biggest proportion of OLG budget with 22% going to PPC. This represents a 6% drop since 2007 and an 11% drop since last year. This fall is consistent with the agency findings [Figure 34]. Natural search gets 17% of budget (down 1%) and email marketing in-house lists get 16% (up 6%). Online display advertising (down 1%) has been more resistant than might be expected and this is probably because online display advertising budgets are more likely to have been cut for branding rather than for direct response. Figure 31: Approximately if necessary, how is your online lead generation budget split? Response: 140 Companies Figure 32: Change in split of budgets since 2007 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 26 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 31. Agencies Figure 33: Typically, how is a client's online lead generation budget split? Response: 169 Agencies Figure 34: Change in split of budgets since 2007 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 27 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 32. 5.3.4. Change in overall marketing spend Surprisingly, despite the recession, there are still more companies who, in the last year, have increased their overall marketing budget rather than decreased it (53% compared to 27%). A fifth of responding organisations say the budget has stayed the same. This suggests that companies are taking note of the well-worn mantra that it doesn‟t pay in the long run to slash marketing budgets during a downturn. However, the supply-side verdict is a bit more gloomy, with respondents more likely to say that clients are typically cutting overall marketing spend [Figure 36]. Respondents in mainland Europe are most likely to have increased their overall marketing budgets [Figure 37]. And looking at this data by sector [Figure 3871%( in both 2008 and 2007], financial services is the area where there is most likely to have been an increase. Companies Figure 35: Has your overall marketing spend increased or decreased in the last year? Response: 172 Agencies Figure 36: Typically, has overall client marketing spend increased or decreased in the last year? Response: 193 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 28 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 33. Figure 37: Breakdown by geography Note: Differences between geographies may not be statistically significant due to smaller sample sizes outside the UK. Figure 38: Breakdown by industry sector Note: Differences between sectors may not be statistically significant due to small sample sizes. Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 29 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 34. 5.3.5. Split of lead generation budget The average proportion of lead generation budget which is spent online has increased to 61% from 53% in 2008 [Figure 39]. As seen earlier, the use of offline channels has typically decreased, sometimes drastically, whereas online channels have generally been more resilient during the recession. This trend is reinforced by Figure 40 below which shows that 59% of responding organisations have increased their budgets for online lead generation in the last year, compared to only 19% who say they have increased their budget for offline lead generation. This contrast between the fortunes of online and offline lead generation is even more apparent in Figure 41 which shows the supply-side responses. Three-quarters of agency respondents say their clients have typically decreased their offline budgets, compared to just 20% for online. Companies Figure 39: Approximately if necessary, how much of your lead generation budget is spent offline and how much is spent online? Response: 155 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 30 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 35. 5.3.6. Change in online lead generation budget Companies Figure 40: Have your budgets for online and offline lead generation increased or decreased in the last year? Response: 176 Agencies Figure 41: Have your clients' budgets for online and offline marketing typically increased or decreased in the last year? Response: 188 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 31 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 36. 5.3.7. Reasons for change in budgets The economic downturn has resulted in companies becoming more focused on where they allocate budgets. Consequently, there has been a shift towards online channels, which are perceived to be more cost-effective. One company mentioned that the decision to market online in addition to offline was a new approach in response to the current recessionary climate. According to companies surveyed, the advantages of online channels are the inherent measurability, the ability to scale and ease of management. Compared to offline channels, online is also more effective in delivering leads and lower cost per acquisition (CPA). In the recession, more than ever, marketers need to invest in channels that deliver tangible, demonstrable return-on-investment. A handful of respondents also mentioned a shift towards using social media for online lead generation, as these are thought to be more cost-effective. Why has there been a change in where you are allocating budget? “The economic downturn has caused businesses to be much more focused into where spend is going to be. In some cases, we are spending in areas where we haven't before, and in other cases, we are spending as little as possible and trying to manage as much as possible in-house.” “The online channel increasingly viewed as the most effective, and also allows for indirect generation of leads through the avoidance of „direct to‟ techniques such as search optimisation.” “Offline not effective in generating leads or measurable mind-share.” “Offline methods are expensive and don't work well.” “There has been increased momentum towards social media marketing because of its increase in popularity. The economic downturn has also encouraged this shift because online marketing is less expensive.” Company respondents If relevant, why has there been a change in where your clients are allocating budget? “Better comparability between online and offline cost per lead has enabled our clients to shift budgets from off- to online.” “Offline is too expensive and doesn't get the same speed of responses as online. Faster calls to action and results too.” “Online - increased ease of use and confidence in capabilities. Offline - economic pressures to reduce costs, even as the alternative. Online has increased appeal and cost effectiveness.” “They see the internet as a potentially more cost effective way of reaching their audience.” “It has become more important to measure the return on investment, considering typical advertising/marketing budget cuts.” Agency respondents Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 32 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 37. 5.4. Effectiveness and measurement 5.4.1. Effectiveness of online lead generation methods While online methods for lead generation are seen as more effective than offline methods, it is clear that online lead generation is getting more difficult. Compared to 2008 [Figure 43], fewer respondents are saying that the most commonly used online channels (i.e. PPC, SEO and email marketing to in-house lists) are „very effective‟ for getting consumer leads for their business. This reflects a more competitive online environment where there are fewer quick wins for businesses. There is more competition for natural and paid-for search engine visibility, while at the same time it is harder to get consumers‟ attention with email. That said, there are still opportunities for businesses marketing online, and the overwhelming majority regard online channels as either „very effective‟ or „quite effective‟. Rich media has seen the biggest drop in the proportion of respondents regarding this channel as „very effective‟ for online lead generation (down from 26% in 2008 to 11% in 2009). It may be that the novelty for consumers is wearing off, and the increasingly prevalent nature of online video means that it is less effective as a lead generation tool. The agency findings show as similar story although, since last year, there have been slight increases in the proportion of respondents saying that SEO and email marketing rented lists are „very effective‟ [Figure 44]. Companies Figure 42: For those which are relevant, how effective are these online methods for getting consumer leads / prospects for your business? Response: 208 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 33 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 38. Companies Figure 43: Change in proportion of respondents saying „very effective‟ since 2008 Agencies Figure 44: How effective are these online methods for getting consumer leads / prospects for your clients? Response: 200 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 34 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 39. Agencies Figure 45: Change in proportion of respondents saying „very effective‟ since 2008 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 35 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 40. 5.4.2. Offline conversion of online leads Companies are more likely to be „generating leads online with the intention of converting them offline‟. The percentage of respondents who say this is „very much part of our strategy‟ has increased from 40% last year to 45% in 2009. UK organisations are more likely to have a strategy of using offline channels to convert leads generated online [Figure 48]. In the US, 37% say this is very much part of their strategy, and this figure drops to only 23% for European respondents (excluding the UK). Companies Figure 46: Do you generate leads online with the intention of converting them offline? Response: 172 Agencies Figure 47: Do your clients typically generate leads online with the intention of converting them offline? Response: 192 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 36 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 41. Figure 48: Converting leads offline - breakdown by geography Note: Differences between geographies may not be statistically significant due to smaller sample sizes outside the UK. Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 37 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 42. 5.4.4. How online leads are converted Three quarters of organisations (75%) say they convert online leads via email and online transactions, and this compares to 58% who say they do this by telephone, 12% for stores and 9% for mail order. „Other‟ ways of converting leads include meetings, face-to-face sales and through consultancy services. Companies Figure 49: How do you convert leads generated online? Response: 164 Agencies Figure 50: How do your clients convert leads generated online? Response: 192 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 38 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 43. Figure 51: Converting leads online – breakdown by geography Note: Differences between geographies may not be statistically significant due to smaller sample sizes outside the UK. Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 39 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 44. 5.4.5. Measuring the effectiveness of online lead generation Companies are still struggling to measure the effectiveness of their lead generation activity, with only a third saying they are „excellent‟ (7%) or „good‟ (26%) at this. This compares to 43% who say they are „average‟ (26%), „poor‟ (15%) or „very poor‟ (2%) at this. The agency findings [Figure 53] also show no real discernible improvement in measurement of OLG effectiveness. Figure 52: How good are you at measuring the effectiveness of your online lead generation activity? Response: 172 Figure 53: How good are your clients at measuring the effectiveness of their online lead generation activity? Response: 194 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 40 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 45. 5.4.6. Assessing online lead generation campaigns The quality of leads and return on investment are the two most important factors when assessing the quality of online lead generation campaigns. Figure 54: What is most important when assessing online lead generation campaigns? Response: 167 Figure 55: What is most important when assessing online lead generation campaigns? Response: 190 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 41 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 46. 5.4.7. Problems encountered with online lead generation Respondents were asked to explain what the main problems were with Online Lead Generation. Poor quality leads were deemed to be the main problem with online lead generation, followed by the lack of quality data. A handful of respondents mentioned the inability to track leads through to conversion as a significant factor. There is also a lack of co-ordination between online and offline channels, particularly if conversion of leads generated online occurs offline. The lack of experience and expertise with online channels is also perceived as a significant threat. From the agency perspective, a lack of specific skills and knowledge is preventing many companies from exploiting leads generated online as well as they could. Problems encountered with lead generation “Awful quality, non-qualified, non-converting leads from incentivised consumers. Cowboy salesmen. Lack of trust in collection methods especially relating to privacy.” “Lack of quality of leads if not checked properly.” “Extreme variation in data quality.” “It‟s hard to track conversions - lack of communication between sales and marketing.” “Poor quality leads, which invariably means cost goes up. Lack of transparency.” “Complexity of online, offline integration of campaigns, particularly as full conversion of leads always takes place offline. Regulatory restrictions in what is allowed or allowable.” “Lack of marketing expertise in exploiting online channels and techniques.” “Company staff have poor knowledge of the rapidly developing skills required to do the job.” “Lead quality - it is easy to capture a lead but they have to be the right type in order to convert for a client. All client factors must be assessed and filtered (including „hidden‟ factors that may not be apparent) before you can decide on a rate and volume.” “Clients‟ inability to understand initially the importance of testing website changes for conversion improvements.” Company and agency respondents Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 42 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 47. 5.5. Online lead generation in international markets 5.5.1. Selling in other markets outside of home country 58% of company respondents say they typically sell in other markets outside their own country. Figure 56: Do you sell in other markets outside your own country? Response: 171 Figure 57: Do your clients typically sell in other markets outside their own country? Response: 188 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 43 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 48. 5.5.2. Online lead generation campaigns in international markets Just over two thirds (68%) of companies who sell in international markets carry out online lead generation in other countries, but around a third (32%) do not. Figure 58: Does your organisation run online lead generation campaigns in other international markets? [Companies selling in foreign markets] Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 44 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 49. 5.5.3. Has the recession encouraged international sales? 38% of company respondents say that the recession has encouraged them to sell in other international markets. [Figure 59] Companies Figure 59: Has the recession encouraged you to sell in other international markets? Response: 171 Agencies Figure 60: Has the recession encouraged your clients to sell in other international markets? Response: 188 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 45 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 50. 5.5.4. Factors preventing companies from selling internationally The biggest factors preventing companies from selling in other international markets are: products and services not relevant abroad (32%), the cost of building a team (23%) and lack of understanding about local markets (17%). Figure 61: If relevant, what is the biggest factor preventing you from selling internationally? Response: 130 Figure 62: If relevant, what is the biggest factor preventing your clients from selling internationally? Response: 148 Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 46 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 51. Figure 63: Factors preventing companies from selling internationally – breakdown by geography Note: Differences between geographies may not be statistically significant due to smaller sample sizes outside the UK. Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 47 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009
  • 52. 5.5.5. Problems encountered with lead generation in other countries There are many reasons for why undertaking online lead generation in other countries is problematic. The expense associated with international online lead generation campaigns was mentioned as a problem for many companies surveyed. Cultural differences and understanding user behaviour can also have a significant impact, but this is problematic for any company undertaking business abroad. Related to this are language barriers, as optimising landing pages for specific international markets in the local language can be problematic. In terms of lead generation, it is also important to take into account time difference, particularly when it comes to contacting and closing leads generated online. International markets also may have different regulatory restrictions, especially regarding privacy and how to store data and personal information. The quality of the leads as a barrier was also mentioned by a handful of respondents, but this may require greater knowledge of the international market, which develops as companies enter the market. What problems, if any, have you encountered with Online Lead Generation campaigns in other countries? “Understanding cultural differences and user behaviour, in the international market.” “Language barriers and legislations.” “Local regulatory restrictions particularly in and around storage and transfer of personally identifiable data.” “Localization of campaign and messages.” “Such widely varying cultural and market dynamics make it difficult to organise a campaign from a central perspective. It needs more local knowledge and focus.” “Too expensive to ship using regular carrier, too many customs headaches, fraud, unreliable tracking information.” Company and agency respondents Online Lead Generation (B2C) Report 2009 in association with Clash-Media Page 48 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2009