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Pediatrics 101 - Power Point Presentation

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  • 1. American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatrics 101
  • 2. Pediatricians:
    • Focus on the physical, emotional, and social health of infants, children, adolescents, and young adults from birth to 21 years.
    • Focus on prevention, detection, and management of physical, behavioral, developmental, and social problems that affect children.
    • Treat infections, injuries, and many types of organic disease and dysfunction.
    • Work towards reducing infant and child mortality, foster healthy lifestyles, and ease the day-to-day difficulties of those with chronic conditions.
  • 3. General Pediatrician’s Responsibilities Include:
    • Management of serious and life-threatening illnesses
    • Referral of more complex conditions as needed
    • Consultative partnerships with other care providers
    • Health supervision
    • Anticipatory guidance
    • Monitoring physical and psychosocial growth and development
    • Age-appropriate screening
    • Diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic disorders
    • Community-based activities in sports medicine, school health, and public health
  • 4. Pediatrics
    • You have to do what will make you happy!
    • No other physician group can match pediatricians on career satisfaction
      • 96% of current graduating pediatric residents who are in the general practice job market report that if they did their residency over, they would choose pediatrics again
      • Pediatricians report higher satisfaction than internists on key satisfaction indicators including job, career, and specialty satisfaction
    2003 AAP Third-Year Resident Survey, unpublished data
  • 5. Pediatrics
    • The opportunities for graduates of pediatric residencies are diverse and numerous
      • 80% of residents seeking a general practice position report obtaining their most desired position
      • Many pediatric subspecialties are currently experiencing workforce shortages
    Pediatric training and job market trends: results from the American Academy of Pediatrics Third-Year Resident Survey, 1997-2002. Pediatrics. 2003;112:787-792
  • 6. Pediatrics
    • Flexible jobs are more common in pediatrics than any other specialty
      • 26% of pediatricians versus 14% of all physicians have worked part-time at some point in their careers
      • Pediatrics offers a broad spectrum of rewarding career options (variety of practice settings and styles)
      • There are many medically underserved communities seeking pediatricians
    American Academy of Pediatrics Division of Health Policy Research. Pediatrics leads specialists in number of part-time physicians. AAP News . 2002,21:126
  • 7. Pediatrics
    • Employment settings
      • Group practice: 45.3%
      • Solo/2-physician practice: 15%
      • Hospital or clinic: 14.5%
      • Medical school: 12%
      • Other: 9.9%
      • Health maintenance organization: 3.3%
    Source: American Academy of Pediatrics. Socioeconomic survey of pediatricians. #57-60, 2004.
    • Practice Location
      • Suburbs: 40%
      • Urban practice (non-inner city): 28.2%
      • Urban practice (inner city): 20.5%
      • Rural: 11.3%
  • 8. Medical School
    • Best resource on medical specialties is the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) at www.abms.org
    • Most medical schools now have a pediatric special interest group. If there isn’t an interest group, speak to your clerkship director about starting one.
    • Get involved: summer externships, volunteering, physician shadowing
  • 9. Choosing a Residency Program
    • Resources for looking at pediatric residency programs:
      • Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) at www.acgme.org
      • Graduate Medical Education Directory from the American Medical Association (AMA) at www.ama-assn.org
      • FREIDA Online (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) from the AMA at www.ama-assn.org
  • 10.
    • When evaluating residency programs consider the following:
      • Diversity and complexity of patients
      • Number of locations in which rotations are conducted
      • Availability of faculty
      • Resident cadre (size and personality)
      • Etc.…
    Choosing a Residency Program
  • 11.
    • Other things to consider:
      • Big city or rural setting
      • Are there cultural activities available
      • Extracurricular activities
      • Good distance from family/friends
      • Etc.…
    Choosing a Residency Program
  • 12.
    • The application process:
      • Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) – a services that transmits applications to residency programs over the Internet
      • Interviews – ask about strength and weaknesses of the program, program flexibility, call schedules, policies on leave, medical liability, insurance benefits, etc.
      • The Match – National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) which offers uniform dates of appointment to residency program sin the US
    Choosing a Residency Program
  • 13. Residency Training
    • Consists of a 3-year program of core pediatric experiences and elective rotations
    • All programs must provide experiences in:
      • Inpatient pediatric care
      • Emergency and acute illness care
      • Continuity care
      • Normal/term baby care
      • Subspecialty care
    • Residents also participate in:
      • Regular scheduled teaching
      • Attending rounds and conferences
      • Procedural skills
      • Scholarly experiences (journal club, research, etc.)
  • 14. Combined Training Programs
    • Internal medicine-pediatrics (4 years)
    • Pediatrics/dermatology (5 years)
    • Pediatrics/emergency medicine (5 years)
    • Pediatrics/medical genetics (5 years)
    • Pediatrics/physical medicine and rehabilitation (5 years)
    • Pediatrics/psychiatry/child and adolescent psychiatry (5 years)
    • More information: American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) at www.abp.org
  • 15. Licensure and Board Certification
    • Medical license – 3-part examination during medical school and residency
      • Pass all 3 parts and eligible to apply for medical license
      • Links to individual state boards can be found on the AMA web site at www.ama-assn.org
    • Board certification requirements (renewed every 7 years)
      • Graduate from an accredited medical school
      • Complete 3 year residency training program
      • Verify satisfactory completion of residency training
      • Acquire a valid, unrestricted state license to practice medicine
      • Pass the 2-day written examination for certification
    • Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics (FAAP)
  • 16. Post-residency Training
    • A pediatric subspecialist is an individual who, as a result of training and experience, is qualified to provide patient care and education and to conduct research in a defined or organ-specific area of medical or surgical care
    • Currently most pediatric subspecialists practice within academic medical systems
    • Most pediatric subspecialists are board-certified general pediatricians who are subspecialty boarded through the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP)
    • Most post-residency training is 3 years in length
  • 17. Post-residency Training
    • Current list of pediatric specialties include:
      • Adolescent medicine
      • Cardiology
      • Child abuse
      • Critical care medicine
      • Dermatology
      • Developmental/behavioral
      • Emergency medicine
      • Endocrinology
      • Gastroenterology
      • Hematology/oncology
      • Hospice and palliative medicine
      • Infectious disease
      • Medical toxicology
      • Neonatal-perinatal medicine
      • Nephrology
      • Neurodevelopmental disabilities
      • Pulmonology
      • Rheumatology
      • Sleep medicine
      • Sports medicine
      • Transplant hepatology
    Fellowship opportunities in the Journal of Pediatrics at www.mosby.com/jpeds
  • 18. Pediatric Subspecialties
    • Most pediatric subspecialties have a “section” of their own with in the AAP that provides a forum for education and dialogue
      • Include both medical and surgical subspecialties
      • www.aap.org /sections
  • 19. Resources from the AAP
    • Medical student membership: $16/year
    • YoungPeds Network at www.aap.org/ypn
    • National Conference & Exhibition (NCE) FREE to medical students
      • October 11-14, 2008 in Boston, MA
    • NCE Clinical Case Program – submit abstract on interesting cases from medical school (due April of each year)
    • Residents as Teachers Handbook – PDF only at www.aap.org/ypn/ms