Fluid and Deformable-Structure Interactions in Bio-Mechanical Systems <ul><li>Lucy Zhang </li></ul><ul><li>Department of M...
Numerical methods for fluid-structure interactions <ul><li>Commercial softwares (ABAQUS, ANSYS, FLUENT…) </li></ul><ul><ul...
<ul><li>Goals: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>accurate (interpolations at the fluid-structure interface) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li...
Finite element based approach for:  Fluid- deformable  structure interactions t=0 <ul><li>Assumptions: </li></ul><ul><li>N...
IFEM nomenclature NO-SLIP BOUNDARY CONDITION Solid is completely  Immersed in the fluid v v s velocity  f  s Cauchy stre...
Equations of motion Principle of virtual work: 1 2 3 1 2 3   s
 Solid: in   s fluid: in   Overlapping  s
Interpolations at the interface Force distribution Velocity interpolation solid node Influence domain Surrounding fluid no...
Algorithm Update solids positions d solid =V solid *dt Read solid & fluid  Geometries Apply initial conditions Distribute ...
Validations Flow past a cylinder Soft disk falling in a channel Leaflet driven by fluid flow 3 rigid spheres dropping in a...
A soft disk falling in a viscous fluid Particle (elastic): Density = 3,000 kg/m 3 Young modulus: E = 1,000 N/m 2 Poisson r...
Fluid recirculation around the soft disk
Pressure distribution
Stress distribution on the soft disk t = 0.0 s t = 1.1 s t = 2.2 s t = 3.3 s t = 4.35 s
Terminal velocity of the soft disk Comparison between the soft sphere and the analytical solution of a same-sized rigid sp...
3 rigid spheres dropping in a tube
3 rigid spheres dropping in a tube
<ul><li>Why is it unique? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>fluid-  deformable  structure interactions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>two-...
<ul><ul><li>Use numerical methods to understand and study cardiovascular diseases. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Find non-inv...
Biomechanical applications Red Blood Cell aggregation Heart modeling - left atrium Deployment of angioplasty stent Venous ...
Why heart? <ul><li>Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of death in the western world. </li></ul>Cardiova...
Cardiovascular system D: The oxygen-poor blood (blue) from the superior vena cava and inferior vena cava fills the right a...
Atrial fibrillation and blood flow During  Atrial Fibrillation  (a particular form of   an irregular or abnormal heartbeat...
Left atrium geometry Courtesy of Dr.  A .  CRISTOFORETTI, [email_address] University of Trento , Italia G. Nollo,  A. Cris...
Left atrium geometry From Schwartzman D., Lacomis J., and Wigginton W.G.,  Characterization of left atrium and distal pulm...
Left atrium with pulmonary veins During diastole (relaxes, 0.06s < t  <  0.43s) , no flow through the mitral valve ( v =0)...
Wall muscle constitutive equation From W. Xie and R. Perucchio, “Computational procedures for the mechanical modeling of t...
Left atrium with appendage Pressure distribution at the center of the atrium during a diastole and systole cycle Transmitr...
Rigid wall
Left atrium (comparison with clinical data) Pressure distribution at the center of the atrium during one cardiac cycle Tra...
Influence of the appendage Transmitral velocity during one cardiac cycle (with and without the appendage) Velocity inside ...
Influence of the appendage Transmitral velocity during one cardiac cycle (with and without the appendage) Velocity inside ...
Then what? <ul><li>Use realistic atrial geometry </li></ul><ul><li>How? </li></ul><ul><li>Medical School (Computed Tomogra...
1  Atrial contraction 2  Isovolumetric contraction 3  Rapid ejection 4  Reduced ejection 5  Isovolumetric relaxation 6  Ra...
Left atrium and fluid mesh (II) Fluid, left atrium and inlet fluid velocity inside the pulmonary veins Left atrium and inl...
Red blood cells and blood RBC FEM RBC model From Dennis Kunkel at  http:// www.denniskunkel.com / <ul><li>Property of memb...
Red blood cells and blood The shear rate dependence of normal human blood viscoelasticity at 2 Hz and 22 °C (reproduced fr...
Shear of a RBCs Aggregate The shear of 4 RBCs at  low shear rate The RBCs rotates as a bulk The shear of 4 RBCs at high sh...
How to link all these together? platelet protein red blood cell vessel heart log (m) -2 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -8 biomaterial Shea...
Micro-air vehicles http://www.fas.org/irp/program/collect/docs/image1.gif <ul><li>three types of MAVs: </li></ul><ul><li>a...
MAVs <ul><li>Features: </li></ul><ul><li>improved efficiency,  </li></ul><ul><li>more lift,  </li></ul><ul><li>high maneuv...
 
Bio-inspired flapping wings muscle contraction
Future work <ul><li>Link IFEM to multiscale numerical approach </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance numerical methods for interfacial...
Acknowledgement <ul><li>Graduate students:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mickael Gay, Yili Gu </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Collaborator...
 
Where do we go from here? <ul><li>Advance current numerical approaches  </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborate with experimentalist...
What can you do? Eat Healthy!
IFEM: Governing Equations Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluid Governing equation of structure Force distributi...
IFEM: Fluid solving algorithm <ul><li>Petrov-Galerkin Weak Form and discretization </li></ul><ul><li>Newton Iteration: sol...
IFEM: Solid Force Calculation External Forces :  External forces can be arbitrary forces from diverse force fields (e.g. g...
IFEM Governing Equations Solve for velocity using the Navier-Stokes equation Eq. (III) The interaction force  f FSI,s  is ...
Structure Analysis-hyperelastic material Mooney-Rivlin material Elastic energy potential: 2 nd  Piola Kirchhoff stress S: ...
Red blood cell model RBC From Dennis Kunkel at  http:// www.denniskunkel.com / Shear rate dependence of normal human blood...
Rigid leaflet driven by a uniform fluid flow   Fluid: H = 1.0 cm L = 4.0 cm U=1cm/s Density = 1.0 g/cm 3 Viscosity = 10.0 ...
Fluid flow around a rigid leaflet Re = 10 INSERT MOVIE1.AVI
Pressure field around a rigid leaflet Re = 10
Leaflet driven by a sinusoidal fluid flow   Leaflet (linear elastic): Fluid:    = 0.8 cm  H = 1.0 cm t = 0.0212 cm L = 4....
Leaflet motion and fluid flow Re = 1.0 and St = 0.5
Tip velocity and displacement (I) Re = 1.0 and St = 0.5
Tip displacement (II)
Venous Valve Courtesy of H.F. Janssen, Texas Tech University. <ul><li>Site of deep venous thrombosis formation </li></ul><...
Venous Valve Simulation
Venous Valve Comparison between experiment and simulation at 4 different time steps
 
Multi-resolution analysis <ul><li>Window function with a dilation parameter: </li></ul><ul><li>Projection operator for the...
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  • The method we want to develop has to be efficient. For a situation where the fluid and solid interacts, typically, the interface between the fluid and the solid domains needs to be traced and the mesh needs to be updated accordingly based on the actual dynamics of the solid or the fluid. As we all know, mesh updating can be a very time consuming procedure, and it’s not a viable approach especially when there is a relatively large movement or deformation involved in the process. In our IFEM method, we will de-couple the fluid and solid into two separate domains where the two sets of governing equations are solved independently. By doing it, there’s certainly complications involved, but we’ll discuss in just a minute how the interface is handled between the two domains. In the IFEM method, there are two assumptions must be made before we proceed further on developing the equations. 1. No-slip boundary condition is assumed at the fluid-solid interface; 2. the solid must remain immersed in the fluid domain completely the whole time
  • Update the symbols
  • In our IFEM approach, the solid actually occupies a volume in the system. Therefore, that creates an overlapping domain when we assume fluid is everywhere in the domain. Using the Principle of virtual work. We come up with two sets of independent equations, one for solid and one for fluid. The derivations for these two equations are rather complicated. We’ll omit discussing on the details. However, notice that in the solid equation, the effects from the artificial fluid in the overlapping domain are taken care of by subtracting its influence in all force terms: the inertial, internal, and external forces. How do we link these two domain together? In other words, how will the fluid monitor the solid movement and react to the movement or vice versa? We will consider the following two terms: the velocity and the interacting force. By using the first assumption we made which says that there is no-slip at the interface, we can interpolate the fluid velocity onto the solid domain because the velocity at the overlapping domain should be the same. Another variable we’ll consider is the interaction force which is calculated in the solid domain. To understand this variable in a more physical sense, you can think of it as the force that is generated by the artificial fluid which is governed by the constitutive law for the solid. This force is been interpolated from the solid to the fluid and will be applied as an external force onto the fluid.
  • As we said earlier, we have two independent domains for the solid and the fluid. As the solid moves, it’s almost impossible to keep all the nodes overlap on top of each other. If we do that, then we lose the advantage of having two independent meshes. So, how do we do the interpolations? We need to define the neighbors for every solid domain. The interpolation process should not lose any energy. Therefore, the interpolation function must satisfy a very important “consistency condition”, at least to the first order.
  • The detailed characterization of left atrium and distal pulmonary vein are published by Schwartzman in 2003. The geometry includes the 4 pulmonary veins entering the atrium. It is only 10 years ago, that physicians used modern visualization device such as TTE and TEE and found that beside atrium and ventricle that we have known of, there is something identified as the left atrium appendage. The left atrium appendage is a small tube attached to the atrium wall. It may or may not be present depending of the patients. It has been shown that the presence of the appendage is more likely to reduce the blood flow and then increase the probability of thrombus formation. Different geometrical shapes and sizes of the appendage have important impact on flow properties. In 50% of the cases of AF, there are two lobes in the LAA and in 25% there are multi-lobes. The geometrical data for appendage is collected by Ernst in his 1995 paper on “morphology of the left atrial appendage” . We used the geometrical data and constructed a simplified geometry for the left atrium and its appendage. will conduct the simulations with and without the appendage in order to show its influence. Label dimensions for the veins, mitrial valve, and the atrium
  • The pulmonary venous flow is prescribed at four locations on the left atrial wall where the pulmonary veins enter the chamber. This pulmonary venous flow is given and is coming from experimental data collected by Klein and Tajik The physilogical Reynolds number is about 2400 inside the pulmonary veins and 1000 inside the left atrium The mitral valve is situated at the bottom of the atrium. In our model, an actual opening and closing mitral valve is not incorporated. Instead, the valve is modeled as a fluid boundary condition. During systole (ventricle systole), the atrium is filling of blood, then there is no flow through the mitral valve (velocities are set to zero) and during diastole (ventricle diastole) blood is ejected from the atrium through the mitral valve to the ventricle. Thus, blood flow is allowed through the mitral valve (free boundary condition). Modeling the valve in this manner provides a means for directing the flow into the left ventricle similar to the physiologic case, but does not account for leaflet flutter
  • This is done by implementing appropriate constitutive equations to closely mimic the behaviors of biomaterials. Material models have only recently been developed for cardiac muscle tissue. A major challenge in modeling muscle tissue is that in addition to passive nonlinear properties, muscle tissue can generate force, termed activation force. To determine the overall or effective behavior of the myocardium, Xie and Perucchio assumed a strain energy function for the myocardial microstructure. This strain energy is divided in two parts, a passive (Wp) during diastole and an active (Wa) one during systole. The first term is similar to other soft tissues and represents the passive nonlinear properties of the myocardium muscle. The second term is new and accounts for the fact that muscle fibers can generate active stress. εij are components of the Green-Lagrange strain tensor. (using the first and second Piola Kirchooff, we can compute the stress along the muscle).
  • We implemented this constitutive equation and applied displacement along the walls to simulate the beating of the left atrium. The volume of the atrium at end of systole is around 2.5 times the volume of the atrium at the end of diastole . This simulates the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscles. Thus, we get this following regular left atrium heart beat. Here is the pattern of the blood flow profile inside the atrium during the cardiac cycles for the case of moving boundaries. As for the rigid case, on this movie, we plot the pressure distribution (top left plot) at the center of the atrium, the transmitral flow velocity (bottom left plot) and the blood pattern inside the atrium during one complete cardiac cycle. We can clearly identify on this movie both systole (filling of the atrium) and diastole (ejection of the blood). It must be pointed out that during diastole, the filling of the atrium occurs also from the pulmonary veins.
  • As you can see, the pattern of the pressure distribution is realistic compared to clinical data. Same conclusion can be drawn for the transmitral velocity . Both E and A waves of the mitral valve during diastole are clearly identified. First, systole occurs . This is the filling of the atrium from the pulmonary veins. At this time, the mitral valve is closed (till 1.4s). The pressure increases quickly at the beginning of systole then decreases. Then, diastole starts at time 1.4s. Blood quickly ejects from the atrium and fills the ventricle, pressure declines sharply . This phase is known as the rapid ejection phase and is very short (around 100 ms) (E wave) . Then, there is the reduce ejection phase . Flow across the mitral valve is greatly diminished. Then, pressure and velocity increases for 100 ms This is the atrial contraction phase . It results in the second filling of the ventricle (A wave). Now, we can introduce the appendage in our simulations in order to study its influence on the blood flow and blood clots formation .
  • In order to show the influence of the appendage, we plot on the same graph the transmitral velocity with and without the appendage . With the appendage, the stroke volume decreases . The flow through the mitral valve reduces. The next plot shows the velocity profile of the blood inside the appendage . This velocity is very small compared to the pulmonary venous flow at the inlet and the transmitral flow (at the exit) of the atrium. Thus, there is a low shear rate at this location . Since, it has been proven experimentally that a low shear rate will increase the probability of thrombus formation; our results confirm that the appendage is an attractive location for thrombus formation . And as a consequence, in the case of atrial fibrillation, engenders stroke or embolism due to the breaking of a clot. Plot of a shear stress contour for the appendage????
  • In order to show the influence of the appendage, we plot on the same graph the transmitral velocity with and without the appendage . With the appendage, the stroke volume decreases . The flow through the mitral valve reduces. The next plot shows the velocity profile of the blood inside the appendage . This velocity is very small compared to the pulmonary venous flow at the inlet and the transmitral flow (at the exit) of the atrium. Thus, there is a low shear rate at this location . Since, it has been proven experimentally that a low shear rate will increase the probability of thrombus formation; our results confirm that the appendage is an attractive location for thrombus formation . And as a consequence, in the case of atrial fibrillation, engenders stroke or embolism due to the breaking of a clot. Plot of a shear stress contour for the appendage????
  • A Computed Tomography (CT) scan shows the body’s organs in greater detail and more clearly than regular x-rays. CT uses x-rays and a computer to make a picture of sections of the body. “CTA” stands for computed tomography angiography. A CTA scan gives a view of specific blood vessels (arteries and veins). Computed Tomography is probably the most common source of three-dimensional data. CT scanners are relatively inexpensive. CT uses an X-ray radiation source to image the patient. The CT scanner consists of a couch upon which the patient is placed and a circular gantry through which the couch with patient is passed. Within the gantry is a rotating ring with an X-ray source opposed to a linear array of detectors. The X-ray source is collimated so that the X-rays form a flat fan beam with a thickness determined by the user. During the acquisition of a &amp;quot;slice&amp;quot; of data, the source-detector ring is rotated around the patient. The raw output from the detector array is back projected to form an image of the slice of the body. The couch is moved and then another slice is obtained. Computed tomography (CT) was the first non-invasive radiological method allowing the generation of tomographic images of every part of the human body without superimposition of adjacent structures. The output from a CT scanner is a series of transaxial slices of the patient. Each slice represents a slab of the patients&apos; body with a thickness set by the collimation for the slice (typically 1-10mm). For most CT scanners each slab has 512 by 512 pixels. The size of a pixel can be varied within certain limits (generally 0.5 to 2 mm). Generally each slice is spaced such that they are either overlapping or contiguous, though some protocols call for gaps between the slices. Each pixel ideally represents the absorption characteristics of the small volume within its bounds.
  • The period in which the heart has the least motion is usually (but not always) in diastole, near a phase between 55% and 75%. The maximum volume of the left atrium is at end atrial diastole. The minimum volume is at end atrial systole.
  • The density of RBC is about 15% higher than the fluid (density of blood in 45% of hematocrit is 1.07 g/ml) Thickness of RBC: 7.5 to 10nm Hematocrite: the percent volume of red blood cells Neo-Hookean or Mooney-Ravenlin material is used. The shape of blood cell is described by a empirical function from experimental measurement of RBC cell
  • In the structure part of the analysis, we consider a general 3-D incompressible hyperelastic material model with the Mooney-Rivlin material description C1, c2 and kappa are the material constants.
  • The density of RBC is about 15% higher than the fluid (density of blood in 45% of hematocrit is 1.07 g/ml) Thickness of RBC: 7.5 to 10nm Hematocrite: the percent volume of red blood cells Neo-Hookean or Mooney-Ravenlin material is used. The shape of blood cell is described by a empirical function from experimental measurement of RBC cell
  • Enlarge the recirculation areas.
  • Enlarge the recirculation areas.
  • The inflow increases, reaches its maximum and decreases again. The fluid then stops and the valve closes again
  • To understand the ability of the RKPM to be used for multiresolution analysis, it is necessary to look at its behavior in the frequency or Fourier domain. The key to this ability is the dilation parameter a of the window function. The kernel function acts like a lowpass filter for the solution in this system. By changing the dilation parameter a, it is possible to construct a series of lowpass filter that provide different frequency parts of the solution. Substracting two low-frequency solution parts that are obtained for two different dilations a, a and 2a, we get the high frequency part, which is simply the difference between these two scales. My research was to take advantage of all the benefits that you get from the meshfree method, and to eliminate or reduce the inconvenience that are caused by the meshfree method. By accomplishing that, researchers can use the meshfree approach carefree without have to worry about boundary treatment or large amount of time they use for the calculation.
  • Fluid and Deformable-Structure Interactions in Bio-Mechanical ...

    1. 1. Fluid and Deformable-Structure Interactions in Bio-Mechanical Systems <ul><li>Lucy Zhang </li></ul><ul><li>Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute </li></ul><ul><li>Troy, NY </li></ul>
    2. 2. Numerical methods for fluid-structure interactions <ul><li>Commercial softwares (ABAQUS, ANSYS, FLUENT…) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Explicit coupling technique - generate numerical instabilities (oscillations), diverged solutions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>limited to small mesh deformations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>requires frequent re-meshing or mesh update </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Goals: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>accurate (interpolations at the fluid-structure interface) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>efficient (less/no mesh updating required) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>flexible ( deformable and rigid structures, boundary conditions) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>extensibility (multi-phase flows, various applications) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Immersed Boundary Method (Peskin) - flexible solid immersed in fluid </li></ul><ul><ul><li>structures are modeled with elastic fibers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>finite difference fluid solver with uniform grid </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>limited to small mesh deformations </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>requires frequent re-meshing or mesh update </li></ul></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Finite element based approach for: Fluid- deformable structure interactions t=0 <ul><li>Assumptions: </li></ul><ul><li>No-slip boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface </li></ul><ul><li>Solid is completely immersed in the fluid </li></ul><ul><li>Fluid is everywhere in the domain </li></ul>solid t = t1 solid
    5. 5. IFEM nomenclature NO-SLIP BOUNDARY CONDITION Solid is completely Immersed in the fluid v v s velocity  f  s Cauchy stress  f  s domain   f  s density x Fluid x s (X s ,t) Solid Spatial coordinates
    6. 6. Equations of motion Principle of virtual work: 1 2 3 1 2 3   s
    7. 7.  Solid: in  s fluid: in  Overlapping  s
    8. 8. Interpolations at the interface Force distribution Velocity interpolation solid node Influence domain Surrounding fluid nodes Uniform spacing
    9. 9. Algorithm Update solids positions d solid =V solid *dt Read solid & fluid Geometries Apply initial conditions Distribute F onto the fluid F FSI,s -> F FSI Interpolate v fluid onto solids V solid v fluid ->V solid Fluid analysis (N-S) Solve for v fluid Structure analysis Solve for F FSI,s
    10. 10. Validations Flow past a cylinder Soft disk falling in a channel Leaflet driven by fluid flow 3 rigid spheres dropping in a channel
    11. 11. A soft disk falling in a viscous fluid Particle (elastic): Density = 3,000 kg/m 3 Young modulus: E = 1,000 N/m 2 Poisson ratio: 0.3 Gravity: 9.81 m/s 2 Particle mesh: 447 Nodes and 414 Elements Fluid: Tube diameter, D = 4d =2 cm Tube height, H = 10 cm Particle diameter, d = 0.5 cm Density = 1,000 kg/m 3 Fluid viscosity = 0.1 N/s.m 2 Fluid initially at rest Fluid mesh: 2121 Nodes and 2000 Elements
    12. 12. Fluid recirculation around the soft disk
    13. 13. Pressure distribution
    14. 14. Stress distribution on the soft disk t = 0.0 s t = 1.1 s t = 2.2 s t = 3.3 s t = 4.35 s
    15. 15. Terminal velocity of the soft disk Comparison between the soft sphere and the analytical solution of a same-sized rigid sphere
    16. 16. 3 rigid spheres dropping in a tube
    17. 17. 3 rigid spheres dropping in a tube
    18. 18. <ul><li>Why is it unique? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>fluid- deformable structure interactions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>two-way coupling, higher order interpolation function </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Limitations? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>time step constraint </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>rigid solid case </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Possible expansions? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>compressible system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>multiphase flow </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Usefulness? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>numerous applications! </li></ul></ul>X. Wang - &quot; An iterative matrix-free method in implicit immersed boundary/continuum methods, &quot; Computers & Structures , 85, pp. 739-748, 2007.
    19. 19. <ul><ul><li>Use numerical methods to understand and study cardiovascular diseases. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Find non-invasive means to predict physical behaviors and seek remedies for diseases </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Simulate the responses of blood flow (pressure and velocities) under different physiologic conditions. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compare our results (qualitatively) with published clinical data and analyze the results. </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Biomechanical applications Red Blood Cell aggregation Heart modeling - left atrium Deployment of angioplasty stent Venous valves Large deformation (flexible)
    21. 21. Why heart? <ul><li>Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of death in the western world. </li></ul>Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) accounted for 38.0 percent of all deaths or 1 of every 2.6 deaths in the United States in 2002. It accounts for nearly 25% of the deaths in the word. In 2005 the estimated direct and indirect cost of CVD is $393.5 billion .
    22. 22. Cardiovascular system D: The oxygen-poor blood (blue) from the superior vena cava and inferior vena cava fills the right atrium. E: The oxygen-poor blood in the right atrium fills the right ventricle via tricuspid valve. F: The right ventricle contracts and sends the oxygen-poor blood via pulmonary valve and pulmonary artery to the pulmonary circulation. A: The oxygen-rich blood (red) from the pulmonary vein fills the left atrium. B: The oxygen-rich blood in the left atrium fills the left ventricle via the mitra valve. C: The left ventricle contracts and sends the oxygen-rich blood via aortic valve and aorta to the systemic circulation. A F D E C B
    23. 23. Atrial fibrillation and blood flow During Atrial Fibrillation (a particular form of an irregular or abnormal heartbeat): The left atrium does not contract effectively and is not able to empty efficiently. Sluggish blood flow may come inside the atrium. Blood clots may form inside the atrium.  Blood clots may break up Result in embolism . Result in stroke . Without blood clots with a blood clot Left atrial appendage
    24. 24. Left atrium geometry Courtesy of Dr. A . CRISTOFORETTI, [email_address] University of Trento , Italia G. Nollo, A. Cristoforetti , L. Faes, A. Centonze, M. Del Greco, R. Antolini, F. Ravelli: 'Registration and Fusion of Segmented Left Atrium CT Images with CARTO Electrical Maps for the Ablative Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation', Computers in Cardiology 2004, volume 31, 345-348; Pulmonary veins Pulmonary veins Left atrium Left atrial appendage Pulmonary veins Pulmonary veins Mitral valve Left atrium Blood clots
    25. 25. Left atrium geometry From Schwartzman D., Lacomis J., and Wigginton W.G., Characterization of left atrium and distal pulmonary vein morphology using multidimensional computed tomography. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2003. 41 (8): p. 1349-1357 Ernst G., et al., Morphology of the left atrial appendage. The Anatomical Record, 1995. 242: p. 553-561. Left atrium Left atrial appendage Pulmonary veins 77mm 28mm 20mm 17mm 56mm
    26. 26. Left atrium with pulmonary veins During diastole (relaxes, 0.06s < t < 0.43s) , no flow through the mitral valve ( v =0) During systole (contracts, 0.43s < t < 1.06s), blood flow is allowed through the mitral valve (free flow) Blood is assumed to be Newtonian fluid, homogenous and incompressible . Maximum inlet velocity: 45 cm/s Blood density: 1055 kg/m 3 Blood viscosity: 3.5X10 -3 N/s.m 2 Fluid mesh: 28,212Nodes, 163,662 Elements Solid mesh: 12,292 Nodes, 36,427 Elements Klein AL and Tajik AJ. Doppler assessment of pulmonary venous flow in healthy subjects and in patients with heart disease. Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, 1991, Vol.4, pp.379-392.
    27. 27. Wall muscle constitutive equation From W. Xie and R. Perucchio, “Computational procedures for the mechanical modeling of trabeculated embryonic myocardium”, Bioengineering Conference, ASME 2001, BED-Vol. 50, pp. 133-134 Strain energy Passive strain during diastole Active strain during systole Second Piola-Kirchhoff stress Green-Lagrange strain First Piola-Kirchhoff stress a 8 =0.151188 a 9 =0.239858 a 10 =0.192101 a 11 =0.092228 a 12 =0.091987 a 13 =0.067475 a 1 =0.095034 a 2 =0.674883 a 3 =1.120781 a 4 =1.488016 a 5 =0.419720 a 6 =0.703426 a 7 =0.515748 W a W p
    28. 28. Left atrium with appendage Pressure distribution at the center of the atrium during a diastole and systole cycle Transmitral velocity during diastole
    29. 29. Rigid wall
    30. 30. Left atrium (comparison with clinical data) Pressure distribution at the center of the atrium during one cardiac cycle Transmitral velocity during one cardiac cycle Kuecherer H.F., Muhiudeen I.A., Kusumoto F.M., Lee E., Moulinier L.E., Cahalan M.K. and Schiller N.B., Estimation of mean left atrial pressure from transesophageal pulsed Doppler echocardiography of pulmonary venous flow Circulation, 1990, Vol 82, 1127-1139 E A 5 Pressure (mm hg) 2 Time (s) 1.5 1 0
    31. 31. Influence of the appendage Transmitral velocity during one cardiac cycle (with and without the appendage) Velocity inside the appendage during one cardiac cycle
    32. 32. Influence of the appendage Transmitral velocity during one cardiac cycle (with and without the appendage) Velocity inside the appendage during one cardiac cycle
    33. 33. Then what? <ul><li>Use realistic atrial geometry </li></ul><ul><li>How? </li></ul><ul><li>Medical School (Computed Tomography CT scan), but the device is ruined due to Katrina </li></ul><ul><li>Help from Dr. A. Cristoforetti, University of Trento, Italy </li></ul>
    34. 34. 1 Atrial contraction 2 Isovolumetric contraction 3 Rapid ejection 4 Reduced ejection 5 Isovolumetric relaxation 6 Rapid ventricular filling 7 Reduced ventricular filling atrial volume Atrial systole Atrial diastole Atrial systole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ECG LA Volume Min LA volume Max LA volume 75% of max LA volume
    35. 35. Left atrium and fluid mesh (II) Fluid, left atrium and inlet fluid velocity inside the pulmonary veins Left atrium and inlet fluid velocity inside the pulmonary veins
    36. 36. Red blood cells and blood RBC FEM RBC model From Dennis Kunkel at http:// www.denniskunkel.com / <ul><li>Property of membrane </li></ul><ul><li>Thickness of RBC membrane: 7.5 to 10 nm </li></ul><ul><li>Density of blood in 45% of hematocrit: 1.07 g/ml </li></ul><ul><li>Dilation modulus: 500 dyn/cm </li></ul><ul><li>Shear modulus for RBC membrane: 4.2*10 -3 dyn/cm </li></ul><ul><li>Bending modulus: 1.8*10 -12 dyn/cm. </li></ul><ul><li>Property of inner cytoplasm </li></ul><ul><li>Incompressible Newtonian fluid </li></ul>empirical function
    37. 37. Red blood cells and blood The shear rate dependence of normal human blood viscoelasticity at 2 Hz and 22 °C (reproduced from http://www.vilastic.com/tech10.html) Bulk aggregates Discrete cells Cell layers
    38. 38. Shear of a RBCs Aggregate The shear of 4 RBCs at low shear rate The RBCs rotates as a bulk The shear of 4 RBCs at high shear rate The RBCs are totally separated and arranged at parallel layers The shear of 4 RBCs at medium shear rate The RBCs are partially separated RBC-RBC protein dynamic force is coupled with IFEM ( NS Solver )
    39. 39. How to link all these together? platelet protein red blood cell vessel heart log (m) -2 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -8 biomaterial Shear induced
    40. 40. Micro-air vehicles http://www.fas.org/irp/program/collect/docs/image1.gif <ul><li>three types of MAVs: </li></ul><ul><li>airplane-like fixed wing model, </li></ul><ul><li>helicopter-like rotating wing model, </li></ul><ul><li>bird-or insect-like flapping wing model. </li></ul>potential military and surveillance use 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 1 10 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 5 10 6 Gross Weight (Lbs)
    41. 41. MAVs <ul><li>Features: </li></ul><ul><li>improved efficiency, </li></ul><ul><li>more lift, </li></ul><ul><li>high maneuverability, </li></ul><ul><li>reduced noise. </li></ul>Loitering wings: high span and a large surface area Fast wings: a low wing span and a small area Flying efficiently at high speed: small, perhaps, swept wings Flying at slow speed for long periods: long narrow wings
    42. 43. Bio-inspired flapping wings muscle contraction
    43. 44. Future work <ul><li>Link IFEM to multiscale numerical approach </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance numerical methods for interfacial problems (multiphase) </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and solve good engineering problems </li></ul>
    44. 45. Acknowledgement <ul><li>Graduate students: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mickael Gay, Yili Gu </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Collaborators: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dr. Holger Salazar (Cardiology Department, Tulane University) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dr. A. Cristoforetti (University of Trento, Italy) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Funding agencies: NSF, NIH, Louisiana BOR </li></ul><ul><li>Computing resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Center for Computational Sciences (CCS) - Tulane </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SCOREC (RPI) </li></ul></ul>
    45. 47. Where do we go from here? <ul><li>Advance current numerical approaches </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborate with experimentalists/physicians to investigate various applications </li></ul><ul><li>Future plans: </li></ul><ul><li>thrombosis & hemostasis (protein dynamics, cell mechanics, bio-material, microfluidics) </li></ul><ul><li>surface interaction - droplet on nanopatterned surfaces (molecular dynamics, contact angle) </li></ul>
    46. 48. What can you do? Eat Healthy!
    47. 49. IFEM: Governing Equations Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluid Governing equation of structure Force distribution Velocity interpolation
    48. 50. IFEM: Fluid solving algorithm <ul><li>Petrov-Galerkin Weak Form and discretization </li></ul><ul><li>Newton Iteration: solve for the 4 unknowns per node: u , v , w , p (three velocity components + pressure) </li></ul><ul><li>Matrix-free formulation is solved by the Generalized Minimum Residual Method ( GMRES ) </li></ul><ul><li>Note that the force exerted from the structure is not updated during the Newton Iteration, therefore the coupling is explicit . </li></ul>With τ m and τ c as stabilization parameters depending on the grid size
    49. 51. IFEM: Solid Force Calculation External Forces : External forces can be arbitrary forces from diverse force fields (e.g. gravity, buoyancy force, electro-magnetic fields). g – acceleration due to gravity Internal Forces : hyperelastic material description (Mooney-Rivlin material). S – 2 nd Piola Kirchhoff stress tensor ε - Green Lagrangian strain tensor Total Lagrangian Formulation
    50. 52. IFEM Governing Equations Solve for velocity using the Navier-Stokes equation Eq. (III) The interaction force f FSI,s is distributed to the fluid domain via RKPM delta function. The fluid velocity is interpolated onto the solid domain via RKPM delta function The interaction force is calculated with Eq. (I) I. IV. III. II. P and v unknowns are solved by minimizing residual vectors (derived from their weak forms) Distribution of interaction force Insert this inhomogeneous fluid force field into the N-S eqn. Update solid displacement with solid velocity in in
    51. 53. Structure Analysis-hyperelastic material Mooney-Rivlin material Elastic energy potential: 2 nd Piola Kirchhoff stress S: Green-Lagrangian strain  : Cauchy stress  : Internal force f k : Deformation gradient, F: Cauchy deformation tensor, C:
    52. 54. Red blood cell model RBC From Dennis Kunkel at http:// www.denniskunkel.com / Shear rate dependence of normal human blood viscoelasticity at 2 Hz and 22 °C (reproduced from http://www.vilastic.com/tech10.html) Bulk aggregates Discrete cells Cell layers
    53. 55. Rigid leaflet driven by a uniform fluid flow Fluid: H = 1.0 cm L = 4.0 cm U=1cm/s Density = 1.0 g/cm 3 Viscosity = 10.0 dynes/s.cm 2 Re=10 2500 Nodes and 2626 Elements Leaflet (linear elastic):  = 0.8 cm t = 0.0212 cm Density = 6.0 g/cm 3 Young modulus: E = 10 7 dynes/cm 2 Poisson ratio: 0.5 456 Nodes and 575 Elements
    54. 56. Fluid flow around a rigid leaflet Re = 10 INSERT MOVIE1.AVI
    55. 57. Pressure field around a rigid leaflet Re = 10
    56. 58. Leaflet driven by a sinusoidal fluid flow Leaflet (linear elastic): Fluid:  = 0.8 cm H = 1.0 cm t = 0.0212 cm L = 4.0 cm Density = 6.0 g/cm 3 Density = 1.0 g/cm 3 Young modulus: E = 10 7 dynes/cm 2 Viscosity = 1.0 dynes/s.cm 2 Poisson ratio: 0.5 Fluid initially at rest 456 Nodes and 575 Elements 2500 Nodes and 2626 Elements
    57. 59. Leaflet motion and fluid flow Re = 1.0 and St = 0.5
    58. 60. Tip velocity and displacement (I) Re = 1.0 and St = 0.5
    59. 61. Tip displacement (II)
    60. 62. Venous Valve Courtesy of H.F. Janssen, Texas Tech University. <ul><li>Site of deep venous thrombosis formation </li></ul><ul><li>Prevents retrograde venous flow (reflux) </li></ul><ul><li>Site of sluggish blood flow </li></ul><ul><li>Decreased fibrinolytic activity </li></ul><ul><li>Muscle contraction prevents venous stasis: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increases venous flow velocity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compresses veins </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Immobilization promotes venous stasis </li></ul>
    61. 63. Venous Valve Simulation
    62. 64. Venous Valve Comparison between experiment and simulation at 4 different time steps
    63. 66. Multi-resolution analysis <ul><li>Window function with a dilation parameter: </li></ul><ul><li>Projection operator for the scale a </li></ul>a: dilation parameter <ul><li>Wavelet function: </li></ul><ul><li>Complementary projection operator: </li></ul>low scale + high scale

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