Zero, first, second and third conditionals (2nd grade)

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Zero, first, second and third conditionals (2nd grade)

  1. 1. Zero, First, Second and Third Conditionals
  2. 2. Zero conditional  Use – to talk about general truths E.g. If you have a brother or sister, you are not an only child. Note: You are not an only child if you have a brother or sister.  Structure: If + present simple, present simple
  3. 3. First conditional  Use – to talk about possible or likely situations now or in the future E.g. If it rains tomorrow, we’ll stay at home.  Structure: If + present tenses (simple, continuous and perfect) + will + b.i.
  4. 4.  It is possible to use other modals instead of will: If you finish the test early, you can go home. If you work hard, you should pass the exam. If I am tired, I may/ might decide not to go to the party.
  5. 5. Second conditional  Use – to talk about impossible or unlikely situations now or in the future E.g. If I found a wallet on the street, I would take it to the police station. If I didn’t go to the party, I’d be upset.  Structure: If + past simple or continuous + would + b.i.
  6. 6.  It is possible to use other modals instead of would: I am not tired. If I went to bed now, I couldn’t sleep. If I lived on my own, I might decide to get a dog. In conditional sentences you can use WERE for all the subject pronouns: If I were rich, I would buy a big house.
  7. 7. Third conditional  Use – to talk about hypothetical situations in the past E.g. I decided to stay at home last night. I would have gone out if I hadn’t been so tired. I wasn’t hungry. If I had been hungry, I would have eaten something. If he had been looking where he was going, he wouldn’t have walked into the wall.  Structure: If + past perfect simple or continuous + would have + p. p.
  8. 8. UNLESS We can also use UNLESS in conditional sentences. UNLESS can replace IF ... NOT: If we don’t score another goal, we will lose. (1st Cond.) UNLESS we score another goal, we will lose. I couldn’t watch the match if I didn’t have a TV. (2nd Cond.) I couldn’t watch the match UNLESS I had a TV. If she hadn’t been such a good player, she wouldn’t have won the game. (3rd Cond.) UNLESS she had been such a good player, she wouldn’t have won the game.
  9. 9. Source: Laser Grammar Bank Intermediate. Macmillan. P. 23 -28.

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