Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
or Read,Write,
Curate & Argue
0r the Media Literacy Bric-a-Brac Sale
The incomplete project
A Habermasian nonsense experiment?
Generating our own aporias, at an impasse of our own
making.
A R...
MLE discourses (overlapping)
 Social Hagood, Kist, Lee.
 Post-Protectionist Andersen, Reilly , Lundgren, Bindig &
Caston...
Tangled
Crazy Ambition?
Rheingold (2011) & immense responsibility (Abreu &
Mihailidis (2014) for media ed to teach:
 Criticality
...
Media Literacy Elements: Untangling
Which actions can be taught? How measured?
UK Paradox
In 2013, Michael Gove, Secretary of State for Education stated the
current view of the department for education...
STILL “THETRENDYTRAVESTY”?
UK Report to EC (Cost / ANR)
The majority of media teachers in the UK are English graduates.The most
common route into tea...
UK Report to EC (Cost / ANR)
A key recommendation from this report is that funding should be
provided for more detailed re...
Broader recommendations
(1) the composite model of media literacy currently provided by the various EU
and EC strategies i...
Pedagogy
 Porous expertise (McDougall
and Potter, 2014)
 Semi permeable membrane
(Potter, 2012)
 Curation pedagogy (And...
Media Literacy car boot
or bring and buy, swap meet, bric a brac sale, e-bay?
The story of text
The story of .gif
A case study for us today
(1) A relativist continuum
(10)
Serious
‘literacy’, equal in
cultural value to
TheTempest.
(5)
Culturally
significant and
...
• What does your textual experience look and feel like?
• What different spaces and places are there for consuming and pro...
THE POSTMODERN FATHER
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project

645 views
600 views

Published on

Presentation given to Media Literacy Research Symposium, Fairfield University, 21.3.14.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
645
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • I wasn’t taught ‘literacy’ but I was taught to read and write, helped to curate and encouraged to argue. Two conditions to be in place for media literacy – a concern with redistribution of power and respect for the study of popular culture – always a battleground
  • We start and end with Zizek – drawing an analogous relationship between his observations of the inadequate liberal response to consumer capitalism – in which we both embody and internalise our own subordination – and the project of media literacy to date, which, I argue, has done the same by annexing ‘the media’ from literacy in general and also from people – setting up an alienating and defeating Big Other. Rushkoff – employing the techniques of marketing to resist corporatism – a big blank, a losing proposition. Play Zizek Starbucks vid from McLuhan image.
  • Redistribution of power - Tribute to Tony Benn: frames all concerns with literacy – voice, culture, powerful literacies etc
  • ----- Meeting Notes (25/02/2014 17:29) -----Tribute – study of popular culture (legacy) Play vid
  • ----- Meeting Notes (25/02/2014 17:29) -----Play vid and discuss- reception theory par excellence? CURATION – pedaogoy of inexpertise – Ranciere.
  • Buckingham says let the thousand flowers bloom but does the ‘project’ need a more modest ambition in order to make smaller progress with more coherence? Question for audience – do we feel the book’s divergence is a strength?
  • Tangled discourses.
  • Mindfulness = Rheingold’s suggestion – read quote from MLA intro page xxviii
  • Can we teach change to action? It’s not as cynical as it sounds to ask that. Is that the goal of education or a fortunate by-product?
  • UK paradox – we have the most media education and it’s in the mainstream curriculum but it’s derided by every government. Epistemological cul de sac.
  • Play and ask if people are surprised?
  • Neglected? Pedagogy has not yet matched the changes in media that it should be responding to.Producer – audience boundaries blurred, but teacher – student not so?
  • Ask for other terms to describe?
  • How to account for shared expertise and more porous interchange?
  • 4 minutes in. Medium is the message? Literacies at work in .gif?
  • ----- Meeting Notes (07/03/2012 11:07) -----Literacy research exploring situated literacies, habitus and field. Describe project - play vid
  • Re-configuration – back to Ned and Lego Movie, or story of .gif – a game trying to be a film or a novel, and here a study guide looking like one for a novel. But to the participants (students), none of this really matters – just texts.
  • Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project

    1. 1. Media Literacy: The Incomplete Project or Read,Write, Curate & Argue 0r the Media Literacy Bric-a-Brac Sale
    2. 2. The incomplete project A Habermasian nonsense experiment? Generating our own aporias, at an impasse of our own making. A Rushkoffion Big Blank? The way out = a pedagogic shift.
    3. 3. MLE discourses (overlapping)  Social Hagood, Kist, Lee.  Post-Protectionist Andersen, Reilly , Lundgren, Bindig & Castonguay, Shwarz.  Citizenship Jolls et al, Mihailidis, Melki, Leaning, Agosto & Magee, Bogel, Fry, Pernisco, Gordon & Schirra,Gallagher, Livingstone &Wang.  Creative Dezuanni &Woods, Jensen.  Subject Media McDougall, Duanic, De Abreu, Considine & Considine, Silverblatt et al.
    4. 4. Tangled
    5. 5. Crazy Ambition? Rheingold (2011) & immense responsibility (Abreu & Mihailidis (2014) for media ed to teach:  Criticality  Participation  Engagement  Vibrancy  Inclusion  Tolerance and even mindfulness Compare to other disciplines ‘in the centre’. To do this from the margins – possible?
    6. 6. Media Literacy Elements: Untangling Which actions can be taught? How measured?
    7. 7. UK Paradox In 2013, Michael Gove, Secretary of State for Education stated the current view of the department for education: I certainly have no wish to dissuade any one who wishes to pursue a course in media studies if that is their whole heart’s desire. The current problem with subjects like media studies relates to the way our league tables work. They encourage schools to push a subject which, currently, actually limits opportunities. Irrespective of my views, it’s a fact that some of our best universities consider media studies to be a less rigorous preparation for higher education than other courses. Students who take it up limit their capacity to choose freely between universities. It’s a simple truth that a pass in physics or further maths opens more doors.
    8. 8. STILL “THETRENDYTRAVESTY”?
    9. 9. UK Report to EC (Cost / ANR) The majority of media teachers in the UK are English graduates.The most common route into teaching media is through a PGCE or equivalent postgraduate teacher training course in English, although more generic ‘on the job’ training routes are increasingly common due in part of funding reforms. The percentage of Media teachers holding degrees in the subject increases year on year, but the absence of accredited teacher training in the subject continues.There is, at present, only one Media teacher training course. Media education training is thus dominated by masters level courses that do not carry qualified teacher accreditation, modules within Masters in Education programmes and by continuing professional development courses and events:
    10. 10. UK Report to EC (Cost / ANR) A key recommendation from this report is that funding should be provided for more detailed research into this relationship between Media Studies and media / digital / information literacy in order to provide robust evidence of the need for training and legitimation for the subject as the preferable ‘conduit’ for digital citizenship in the 21st century, and to provide a compelling case for a formal policy mandate for Media Studies as the agent for this. Never going to happen. Like, ever.
    11. 11. Broader recommendations (1) the composite model of media literacy currently provided by the various EU and EC strategies is too broad in scope and ambition for mainstream education to ‘deliver’ and therein lies a fundamental mismatch between the objectives of media literacy as articulated in policy and the capacity of education as the agent for its development in society; (2) to coherently match Media Studies in the UK to the policy objectives for media literacy expressed in European policy, Government funding (for teacher training), support and endorsement for Media Studies is essential; (3) funding should be prioritised for broader research into the capacity for Media Studies in schools and colleges to develop media and information literacy as defined by the European Union.
    12. 12. Pedagogy  Porous expertise (McDougall and Potter, 2014)  Semi permeable membrane (Potter, 2012)  Curation pedagogy (Andrews and McDougall, 2013)  Pedagogy of the inexpert (Kendall and McDougall, 2012)
    13. 13. Media Literacy car boot or bring and buy, swap meet, bric a brac sale, e-bay?
    14. 14. The story of text
    15. 15. The story of .gif
    16. 16. A case study for us today
    17. 17. (1) A relativist continuum (10) Serious ‘literacy’, equal in cultural value to TheTempest. (5) Culturally significant and worthy of educational response by virtue of scale of engagement. (1) Risk reduction through media literacy. (2)What’s to bring and buy?
    18. 18. • What does your textual experience look and feel like? • What different spaces and places are there for consuming and producing textual meaning? • What does it mean to be a producer and consumer in these spaces and places? • What different kinds of textual associations and affiliations do you make, with whom and for what? • What is an author and what is being creative? • How do you represent yourself in different spaces and places? • What is reading, what is writing, what is speaking and what is listening and what is learning?
    19. 19. THE POSTMODERN FATHER

    ×