Media and collective identityjulian mcdougall <br />
AS Radio and TV Drama as formative <br />Hip Hop generations – warm up for everything<br />District 9 and representation –...
Recommended <br />
Men’s magazine covers = women<br />Women’s magazine covers = women<br />Why?<br />
Mulvey and the Male Gaze<br />1975 – Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema<br />Male characters are ‘bearers of the look’<b...
Butler: Gender Trouble<br />
Complicity <br />Althusser: interpellation <br />	misrecognition)<br />Winship: complicity and <br />	(false) belonging<br...
Media Audiences and The Sociological Imagination<br />Although we might think of media habits as mundane and idiosyncratic...
Cultural Imperialism<br />Local Resistance<br />
British Film<br />
Film and Representation<br />Films do not present a neutral, transparent view of reality, but offer instead a mediated re-...
Historical Perspective<br />
TV, Representation, Identity <br />
Social Document?<br />
TV and Representation<br />Texts not present a neutral, transparent view of reality, but offer instead a mediated re-prese...
Why is Skins controversial?<br />
Celebrity <br />The Demotic Turn (Turner, 2010)<br />
Moral Panics<br />
Zizek<br />Virtual reality = product deprived of its substance.<br />“Just as decaffeinated coffee smells and tastes like ...
Privacy<br />Many social networking users often provide highly personal and sensitive information with little concern for ...
Michael Wesch<br />
Media Studies 1.0<br />Media Studies 2.0<br />A belief that students should be taught how to ‘read’ the media in an approp...
Lessons from January<br />Theory, reading, references, application.<br />Historical and contemporary examples (more of the...
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Collective Id Ocr 2010

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Collective Id Ocr 2010

  1. 1. Media and collective identityjulian mcdougall <br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. AS Radio and TV Drama as formative <br />Hip Hop generations – warm up for everything<br />District 9 and representation – ‘warm up’ micro focus<br />Mill, Plato, Althusser, Barthes, Butler – ‘warm up’ macro theory<br />Life on Mars and “how TV changed Britain’<br />Representation of working class Britain (film, TV, music)<br />The Wire, race and ‘the game’ (TV, online) – related to hip hop generations<br />Fandom as collective identity (online, mixed media)<br />Representation of skate culture in online video<br />Identities in social networks and virtual worlds<br />Sexuality – politics of absence (film, advertising)<br />Youth, children and moral panics – TV, online, gaming<br />Gender and celebrity in magazines and ‘talent TV’<br />Postmodernism and identity in music, games and online<br />We Media, media power and the public sphere – TV, the press, online<br />Representations of education – The Class, We are the People (film, the press).<br />Media 2.0, mash-ups and reception theory proved right?<br />Women and Film<br />
  4. 4. Recommended <br />
  5. 5. Men’s magazine covers = women<br />Women’s magazine covers = women<br />Why?<br />
  6. 6.
  7. 7. Mulvey and the Male Gaze<br />1975 – Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema<br />Male characters are ‘bearers of the look’<br />Schopophilia (Freud) - pleasure in looking<br />‘The determining male gaze projects its fantasy onto the female figure’. (1989: 19)<br />Cinema screen acts as distorting mirror (Lacan) for spectators who then (mis)recognise themselves<br />
  8. 8. Butler: Gender Trouble<br />
  9. 9. Complicity <br />Althusser: interpellation <br /> misrecognition)<br />Winship: complicity and <br /> (false) belonging<br />Gauntlett – irony / play <br />
  10. 10. Media Audiences and The Sociological Imagination<br />Although we might think of media habits as mundane and idiosyncratic, the fact that we all have them shows structural forces afoot. (Ruddock: 77)<br />
  11. 11. Cultural Imperialism<br />Local Resistance<br />
  12. 12.
  13. 13. British Film<br />
  14. 14. Film and Representation<br />Films do not present a neutral, transparent view of reality, but offer instead a mediated re-presentation of it.<br />Types of Realism<br />Discourses<br />Ideology <br />Plural readings<br />
  15. 15. Historical Perspective<br />
  16. 16. TV, Representation, Identity <br />
  17. 17. Social Document?<br />
  18. 18. TV and Representation<br />Texts not present a neutral, transparent view of reality, but offer instead a mediated re-presentation of it.<br />Types of Realism<br />Discourses<br />Ideology <br />Plural readings<br />
  19. 19. Why is Skins controversial?<br />
  20. 20.
  21. 21.
  22. 22.
  23. 23.
  24. 24. Celebrity <br />The Demotic Turn (Turner, 2010)<br />
  25. 25. Moral Panics<br />
  26. 26.
  27. 27. Zizek<br />Virtual reality = product deprived of its substance.<br />“Just as decaffeinated coffee smells and tastes like real coffee without being real coffee, Virtual reality is experienced as reality without being so. What happens at the end of this process of virtualization, however, is that we begin to experience ‘real reality’ itself as a virtual entity”.<br />(2002:231) <br />
  28. 28. Privacy<br />Many social networking users often provide highly personal and sensitive information with little concern for privacy risks<br />Terms of use important (Facebook – advertising)<br />Most potential employers now 'Google' applicants - making it a reputation manager as well as a search engine<br />To what extent can information remain available long after it is relevant or accurate?<br />Also possible to create fake identities in online spaces, making it difficult to verify that people are who they claim to be.<br />
  29. 29.
  30. 30. Michael Wesch<br />
  31. 31. Media Studies 1.0<br />Media Studies 2.0<br />A belief that students should be taught how to ‘read’ the media in an appropriate’critical’ style<br />The patronizing belief that students should be taught how to ‘read’ the media is replaced by the recognition that media audiences in general are already extremely capable interpreters of media content <br />Very much a contested idea – <br />Buckingham, Turner, Laughey, Lister et al<br />
  32. 32. Lessons from January<br />Theory, reading, references, application.<br />Historical and contemporary examples (more of the latter).<br />‘Stretch and challenge’ = pre-HE level.<br />Connections and synthesis.<br />Engagement with debates.<br />Reference to own media culture. <br />Avoid over-reliance on texts.<br />Adopt Cultural Studies ‘mindset’.<br />

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